TechSpot

Hardware

Hardware

The latest happenings in PC hardware and enthusiast computing. We cover processors, graphics cards, desktop and mobile systems, tablets, input devices and much more.

Intel quietly launches entry-level Braswell SoCs

Intel quietly launches entry-level Braswell SoCs

Intel has quietly launched a range of Braswell SoCs designed for entry-level desktops and notebooks. The new SoCs, which feature similar hardware to Intel's upcoming Cherry Trail line, contain up to four Airmont CPU cores and eighth-generation graphics, built on the…

Samsung 850 Evo M.2 & mSATA Review: V-NAND comes to more form factors

Equipped with 3D TLC NAND, Samsung's 'V-NAND'-based 850 Evo series released last December, stacks layer upon layer of transistors, improving density, endurance and performance, while lowering production costs. Today we have two similarly new drives that focus on different form factors. The 850 Evo mSATA will appeal to compact PC users, while the M.2 will be more sought after by power users.

Battlefield Hardline Benchmarked, Performance Review

Battlefield Hardline showed superb graphics and smooth gameplay when we benchmarked it during last month's week-long public beta, and while the good news was that the game could be played on fairly modest hardware, it didn't quite display Battlefield 4's wow-factor. Developed by Visceral Games, the retail version Hardline is now available and we are back to rerun all the beta tests along with others to see how the frame rates have changed from beta to retail.

AMD FreeSync Review: Laying the groundwork for the ideal adaptive sync standard

While they may be entering the market second with their version of the technology, AMD has laid the groundwork with FreeSync for the ideal adaptive sync standard going forward. The company has delivered on their promises to create a cheaper, more flexible, open standard for variable refresh. We go through some of the main differences with Nvidia's G-Sync, our impressions gaming on a FreeSync monitor, and OEMs crucial role for FreeSync to reach its full potential.

Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan X Review: Bloody fast, surprisingly efficient

The GeForce Titan X is a processing powerhorse: 6 graphics processing clusters, 24 streaming multiprocessors with 3072 CUDA cores. Combined with six 64-bit memory controllers (384-bit) for a total 12GB of GDDR5 memory clocked at 7GHz, that's 50% more cores and memory bandwidth than the current single-GPU king, the GeForce GTX 980 that was released a mere six months ago. Needless to say, we're eager to see what the new Titan X is capable of.

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. 8
  9. 9