TechSpot

Bought LCD TV want to hook my PC to it. What's the difference between 1080i and p?

By mitch04
Jun 14, 2009
  1. Hey Im going to buy this HDMI to DVI and it says
    Suitable for any HDMI application up to 1080i
    my LCD is FULL HDTV 1080P will this work?????

    thank you
     
  2. raybay

    raybay TS Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    1080p resolution is usually 1,920x1,080 pixels and is the "latest" thing in TV because 1080p monitors are capable of displaying every pixel of the highest-resolution HD broadcasts. They could, and should offer twice the resolution of today's 1,280x720, or 720p, HDTVs. Some techs refer to them as ultra-HD while others call them "True" or "Full" for Ultra..

    1080i offers identical 1,920x1,080 resolution but conveys the images in an interlaced format (the i in 1080i). In a tube-based television, otherwise known as a CRT, 1080i sources are put on the screen sequentially, or "paint" odd-numbered lines of resolution appear on your screen first, followed by the even-numbered lines--all within about 1/30 of a second. Progressive-scan formats such as 480p, 720p, and 1080p convey all of the lines of resolution sequentially in a single pass
    P usually results in a smoother and nicer image, which is good for sports and other motion-intensive broadcasts. Displays such as DLP, LCoS, and LCD rear-projection are progressive in nature, so when the incoming source is interlaced, as 1080i is, these TV's convert it to progressive scan for display.
    So 1080i is good. 1080p is better, in the future. Prepare for the future because it is coming.
     
  3. mitch04

    mitch04 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 198

    thank you very much mate
     
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...


Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.