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Class Action Law Suit for lost data and  time

By TonyGuitar
May 23, 2006
  1. Mr. Gates insists that you switch from the Mozilla or Opera browser to IE to download his many patches.

    If I had not switched to Internet Explorer, I would not have lost valuable data and my credit card use.

    If you have been cheated and lost data and much valuable time trying to get rid of malware like: **MS vunerability Rootkit** or,

    [Dropper.small.28.au]

    [embedded in archives. Can not be repaired**=AVG anti--virus scanner**],

    Then I think we have grounds for a class-action lawsuit.

    After all, Microsoft has long been aware of the open vunerability in their applications and kept them **open** for their easy auto-update access at our risk and expense.

    If Microsoft has caused you losses of computer time and your personal data, let me know. TG

    http://TonyGuitar.blogspot.com
     
  2. Samstoned

    Samstoned TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,582

    please get someone to right a decent packager and installer for linux I would switch forever
    I play with fedora core 5 from time to time have yet to dwnld suse heard it was better
    do you remember when computers ran unix and bad old dos
    oh ya and cost like thousands of dollars my first wrteable optic drive cost 3000
    MS has made the pc industry cheap
    so you don't like billy get on with linux as the pro's do
     
  3. Spike

    Spike TS Rookie Posts: 2,371

    I doubt MS would loose such an action. They'd use people like me as an example - people who manage to run XP and hardly ever encounter a problem, keep backups of important data, and are very careful about what they do online.
     
  4. TonyGuitar

    TonyGuitar TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 92

    Spike. you are a saint, but pure?

    Well Spike, you have invested countless hours learning MS Million faceted software and you profit by it now, so one wonders that you rely upon it.

    You recall the days when code was compiled to machine language and functions would zip through like lightening, even with the 386/486.

    You recall when trouble shooting was fun, and did not require an army of code readers to assemble all this bulky C++ bloatware?

    I suspect the first team who supplies a tight suite of basics with most functions out in the open, something like *Printmaster*, and none of this hidden and deeply layered bull**** like you get with the **oh so elegant and mysterious ** Windows gang.

    People want to get things done... not just computer-putt.

    Comuputing fun was the Texas Instrument 99/4A, extended basic and sprites. That was a little while ago. TG
     
  5. Spike

    Spike TS Rookie Posts: 2,371

    he he. :)

    The thing is, while I Have spent an awful long time and effort learning about MS Windows, at the end of the day, while I'm no guru, I don't really need to know half of it to stay clean and reasonably secure. Mostly it's just about experience and common sense.

    Don't get me wrong though, I don't defend MS for a moment for the very buggy OS (though it must be said that with the exception of MSIE, XP isn't half bad). I just mean to say that MS would use people such as myself as examples to show that it's not their fault - it's the end user. In all honesty, that's quite true to an extent, but MS have better lawyers and greater influence and so will easily get out of their portion of the blame.

    As for the rest, unfortunately as one thing in computers progresses, and as things become more complex, everything else has to become more complex to match. That said, writing in assembly or machine code is an awful lot harder than writing in a modern programming language, and harder to debug too! Programs, drivers, and applications have become a lot more complex since then, and to write them in machine code would take years, with debugging taking years more again.
     
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