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CPU explodes probably

By ravisingh
Oct 17, 2016
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  1. I turn my power supply to 115v from 230v and then two consecutive explosive sounds ,and then I suddenly switched of my power,even my PSU also catches fire.....what products in CPU get damaged ? My CPU is assembled with
    Asus z170p motherboard
    Intel Cote i7 6700k processor
    Graphic driver
    Samsung SSD .........etc with 450w PSU
    What products get damaged please tell me guys ......... I m in very trouble.pleease.please.please.......
     
  2. EndlessWaves

    EndlessWaves TS Booster Posts: 164   +34

    We can't tell, you'd have to test them and see.
     
  3. ravisingh

    ravisingh TS Member Topic Starter

    But tell me what is damaged surely
     
  4. Cycloid Torus

    Cycloid Torus TS Evangelist Posts: 1,656   +309

    You ran 230v over components set for 115v based on your switch setting.

    Much of system could be damaged...two explosions - likely capacitors in PSU and on motherboard...fire in PSU=> melted wiring, melted solder...likely damage to power regulation.

    You need to approach with great caution. Current damage might damage working components placed in system in attempt to repair. DO NOT USE PSU for anything.

    Locate a working system which is not too expensive to lose.

    Working from the more isolated components - test in working system - one item at a time....suggested order:
    DVD
    HDD
    GPU
    RAM
    CPU

    If all are working, try another used PSU and test motherboard - just to see if you can get beep codes for error (no CPU, no RAM)

    Inspect each item under strong light & use magnifier...any black or brown spots or broken solder should be examined carefully before testing.

    DO NOT OPEN PSU. DO NOT TEST IT. TOSS IT OUT.
     
    ravisingh likes this.
  5. ravisingh

    ravisingh TS Member Topic Starter

    Thnx
     
  6. ravisingh

    ravisingh TS Member Topic Starter

    Today I checked my CPU then PSU not working but in my motherboard green indicator lighting then what is this mean .......my motherboard is safe or damaged
     
  7. Cycloid Torus

    Cycloid Torus TS Evangelist Posts: 1,656   +309

    Green light merely means there is power present.... sadly, it does not mean the motherboard is good, though with further testing you may find it so.

    Were you able to test DVD, HDD, GPU, RAM ?
     
  8. ravisingh

    ravisingh TS Member Topic Starter

    No I did not test other products but if ....power is present then why my power does not 'ON' and power button on cabinet does not work
     
  9. ravisingh

    ravisingh TS Member Topic Starter

    And..........my PSU is in warranty so it takes 10 to 15 days in returning.....so when PSU comes what I first do.......can I suddenly connect my new replaced PSU with motherboard or I checked each and every product one by one firstly
     
  10. Cycloid Torus

    Cycloid Torus TS Evangelist Posts: 1,656   +309

    " ....power is present then why my power does not 'ON' and power button on cabinet does not work" - likely due to some other damage - testing program I recommended might help sort this out - otherwise it remains a mystery.

    Switching power from 230v to 115v is not likely to be covered by warranty unless you bought extended coverage - not a defect but rather a user error..

    Before you do get a new PSU, I would recommend that you have previously tested all the components - possibly using an older but known good PSU which if it is 'clobbered' during tests would be no great loss. From the dead PSU, the next most likely components to have suffered from the 'big jolt' are Motherboard (especially capacitors and voltage regulation), the CPU (which may have received 2x normal voltage), RAM (same as CPU). Most likely to have survived are Monitor, DVD, HDD and just possibly the GPU if it is not integrated. I would be testing these last 4 on a known good system before proceeding any further...if any of these are dead, then the whole system is probably dead.
     
  11. ravisingh

    ravisingh TS Member Topic Starter

    Thnx buddy
     

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