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discussion about router to router config.

By Samstoned
Sep 6, 2006
  1. letter to linksys reguarding there support files to config 2 routers together
    I bought a 2nd router as a test for question of putting to routers together As stated by nodsu and others
    wan port does not work
    linksys support comment ,:well it should supprised comment
    you are doing something wrong,
    my letter to linksys
    how do you change your faq links to reflect the setup help files for
    a router to router config.
    the only links I find are for wired to wireless
    nothing for wired to wired
    have asked tech support for the config and all that I received
    was wrong and did not work
    cisco website states you cannot use local ip address on WAN port
    your tech help says you can
    I have found , you can not use WAN port on 2nd router
    unless the tech support I am getting does not know how
    this issue has come up very often should be adderessed to highest degree
     
  2. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 9,351   +622

    daisy chaining routers
    network --- router#1 ---- router#2
    .............................+----router#3
    needs two factors to be coordinated in subordinate routers;
    the subnets must be 'similar', eg 192.168.0.x and 192.168.1.x
    and the subnet masks must span all ip-address ranges,
    eg 255.255.251.0 would allow four routers to be attached to router#1

    the down stream router(s) should have its static address(WAN) forced configured.

    set all secondary router(s) DNS to be the ip address of router#1

    devices attached to each router can use DHCP from their attached router
    and devices on one router should be able to ping those on the other.
     
  3. Samstoned

    Samstoned TechSpot Paladin Topic Starter Posts: 1,018

    I wil give that a spin
    thats more info then I received from linksys support
    cisco makes the comment that wan port does not support lan ip
    address's

    updated new email from linksys
    Thank you for contacting Linksys Technical Support. My name is Veronica and I will be assisting you with your concern.

    Based on your email, it seems like you are trying to cascade two (2) routers together and that you are inquiring on how it is supposed to be set up. For this concern, there are two ways on how to cacade the routers. One is from LAN of the main router to WAN of the second router, this set up is possible provided that the second router IP address must be different from the main router. Example is the main router IP address is 192.168.1.1, the second router must used a different subnet for its network and it should use 192.168.X.1. Where "X" can be any number except 1.

    If the set up you select is LAN to WAN, please note that computers connected on the second router will not be able to share or connect to the network on the main router since they are using a different subnet.

    Second is LAN to LAN connection, this type of cascading will literally convert the second router to work only as a switch. To configure the second router as a switch, you must change the IP address of it to avoid any conflict with the main router. Example is the main router address is 192.168.1.1 for the second router use 192.168.1.2. Then disable the DHCP server of the second router. After changing these settings, you may now connect a cable from the LAN port of the main router to the LAN port of the 2nd router. Take note of the connection, nothing should be connected on the WAN port of the second router.
     
  4. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 9,351   +622

    if this is true, then Linksys is junk and they had to do extra
    work to effect this behavior :(

    this is a submask issue and if properly set, this will not be true.
    there are some routers however, that get parochial with the submask.
    the daisy chaining requires a submask that allows more than 255 addresses
    eg 255.255.255.0 allows only 255
    ....255.255.254.0 allows 512​
    if you can set 255.255.253.0 as the mask, you'll be a happy camper.
    otherwise, your in for great frustration

    yes this is a choice, it works, but I assume you knew this and
    had a reason to run as a real router, eg adding a wireless to your net, which
    requires it to run as a RT, not a switch :)
     
  5. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 9,351   +622

    more info

    If your router will not let you set a netmask of 255.255.253.0, here's another approach; use a different non-routed address range.

    There are three blocks of private IP addresses:

    * 10.0.0.0 through 10.255.255.255 needs netmask 255.0.0.0
    * 172.16.0.0 through 172.31.255.255 needs netmask 255.255.0.0
    * 192.168.0.0 through 192.168.255.255 needs netmask 255.255.255.0

    The first block is a single Class A network number,
    the second block is a set of 16 contiguous Class B network numbers,
    the third block is a set of 255 contiguous Class C network numbers.

    the third one is what we see most often, but all three should be supported AND due to the special needs of each Class, a 'bigger' netmask must be supported :)

    so if 192.168.0.1 with netmask 255.255.253.0 fails to be configured, just move to
    172.16.0.1 netmast 255.255.240.0 and the second router as 172.16.1.1 w/same mask

    best wishes
     
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