Fan Positioning

By pbspike
Aug 27, 2003
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  1. (I know this has pry been covered before but I couldn't find it.)

    I have a standard tower ATX case. Currently it has one fan on the back taking in air which the cpu fan then pulls thru the heatsink. (the cpu is at teh upper right of the mobo when standing up.) Then the power supply has one fan on the bottom taking air out of the case and one at the back blowing out. I am getting four more fans in today.

    I was going to put one at the front bottom taking in air. One on the side of the case taking in air. (not sure best place to put it. i.e. above video card or processor, or at bottom) One on the top of the case taking air out. And I was thinking the last fan would also go on top.

    Does this sound good? Should I switch the fan on the back of the pc to take air out?

    Thanks for the help.

    P.S. I also have a fan controller to controll the 4 new fans so they won't always be on. Just during high graphics applications and when it is really warm in my room.
  2. StormBringer

    StormBringer Newcomer, in training Posts: 2,871

    Your fans are about opposite what they should be. Heat rises, so why try to push it down to get it out of the case?

    The best way to set up your fans would be to have a fan at the front, near the bottom(there is probably one or more brackets there for this) that fan should pull air into the case, then you should have a fan near the top rear blowing air out. The PSU will have at least one in it and should already be doing this. Adding an additional fan just below the PSU is a good idea. The CPU fan should be set up correctly already, it blows air over the HS to keep it cool. If you have a blowhole in the side, it will probably be located directly facing the CPU HSF, that fan should blow in(many people position this fan to blow out which is incorrect because it makes it and the HSF work against eachother)

    This is just a basic layout of the fans, you might find a little better positioning of them according to what is in your case. The general idea is to pull cooler air in near the bottom, then forcefully assist the hot air out near the top. You want to keep the air constantly moving in as much of a single direction as possible. Turbulence in that flow will create hotspots.
  3. Nic

    Nic TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,928

    The fan at the rear should be taking air out from the case, so swap it around. Add another fan to the front of your case to suck air in. If your temps are cool after doing that, then don't bother adding any more fans.
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