TechSpot

How far have you gone?

By XtR-X
Sep 16, 2003
Post New Reply
  1. Just wondering... how far you gosus(;)) have gone educational wise in computers.

    Right now I'm taking clases for my CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Assosiate).

    How far have you guys gone?

    (Edit: Also, please state the abbreviation meanings)
     
  2. SNGX1275

    SNGX1275 TS Forces Special Posts: 12,657   +323

    nowhere
    I took C++ and Fortran as an undergrad, but only because it was required that we had to take 1 comp sci class. I got a D in C++ so I thought I better do better for my department to accept my grade and I wasn't about to take C++ again so I took FORTRAN and I got a C. man I hate programming.
     
  3. prashidi

    prashidi TS Rookie Posts: 89

    Well, I am an undergraduate, currently a senior working for a BS in electrical engineering.

    I have had to learn Matlab, C, and C++. I have also learned a little about Fortran. I know PHP pretty well. I also know some assembly language. I worked/working on writing assembly programs for Motorolla 6800, Motoralla HC11 microprocessors.

    I plan to write a program for an unspecified DSP processor that needs to read data from a GPS unit, voltage, current, RPM, etc. sensor and then output that data to a wireless transmitter. Its for a project that we are working on at school. The project is creating a boat that works with solar cells.

    BTW, I dont like writing programs. Unfortunately I have been dragged in to it and I found it to be simple at times. I think I will be working on semiconductor devices for my masters so I will hopefully be getting out of microprocessor and DSP stuff a bit and work with quantum physics and such. Sounds Fascinating....
     
  4. young&wild

    young&wild TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 1,268

    Nowhere i guess.

    Learnt a little bit of BASIC and Visual Basic..thats all. Have trouble recalling them. ;) I would love to get into a CISCO course in near future. :)
     
  5. conradguerrero

    conradguerrero TS Rookie Posts: 357

    took qbasic in high school, java in college, will have to take c++ for engineering.
    also took one network class (not cisco).

    as far as programming goes, making the algorithm is the easy part for me, its debugging that is a pain in the butt
     
  6. Steg

    Steg TS Rookie Posts: 422

    little bit pof basic, little bit of C++ nothing more nothing less
    i cant even take GCSE IT cus the schools IT teacher is CRAP

    Steg

    Edited by Poertner_1274: Watch your lannguage on the boards!
     
  7. Phantasm66

    Phantasm66 TS Rookie Posts: 6,504   +6

    I am learning EVERYTHING!

    I am constantly reading books, web pages, attending university courses, etc.

    Right now, I am working full time with computer (admin), learning MSCE and CCNP level stuff, learning programming in C++, and doing these things whilst I study full time in the evenings!

    Yes, I LOVE COMPUTERS so much that I am working with them full time and learning about them in a university degree course full time as well, during evenings and during the day.

    Programming, hardware, databases, networking - if its computers, then I LIKE IT!

    How far have I gone? Into the heart of it, and going deeper. More Cisco and MS courses. A degree. A masters...

    ...A PhD?!!? Why not!? Plenty of my friends have PhDs in computing!

    Its all possible and all things I have considered.

    I will NEVER STOP.
     
  8. Vehementi

    Vehementi TechSpot Paladin Posts: 3,199

    Wow P66, that is sweet. I'm happy for you that you found your calling...:D

    As for me, right now I'm unofficially A+ certified, I passed an unofficial exam last year. Currently I'm taking a yearlong computer class at the Sno-Isle Skills Center, which takes half a day yearlong away from my junior year in HS. Right now I'm learning about Windows 2000 Server, and will cycle through this, A+, Cisco (CCNA), and Tech Support over the course of one school year. It is a very good class and I'm having a great time so far.
     
  9. StormBringer

    StormBringer TS Rookie Posts: 2,871

    I have an A+, and several certifications that have little to do with PCs. I have taken C++, assembly, BASIC, Fortran, Pascal, and Cobal, when I was in school, though most were useless for PLC automation(I only took them because I was told it was a good idea if I was planning to do PLCs) I do have a certification in PLC automation but its a thing from the state that I have to have in order to do contract work.
    In case you were wondering, I do both consumer and industrial electronics service and repair.

    Learning is an ongoing process and doesn't end with degrees or certifications. Those things are for impressing potential employers and clients.

    The true learning is when you put those things to use and learn from actually doing what you have been studying and make mistakes and learn to correct them. That forges knowledge into wisdom through experience.
     
  10. Phantasm66

    Phantasm66 TS Rookie Posts: 6,504   +6

    True, true. You have to keep learning forever and ever.
     
  11. LNCPapa

    LNCPapa TS Special Forces Posts: 4,356   +283

    I've finished my BS but not in anything computer related. I started off Computer Engineering, then switched to Computer Science, got my Comp Sci Cert from UofM then finished my BS in Business. I too work with computers on a daily basis and am trying to learn everything I can. I have my N+, MCP, MCSA, and MCSE. I'm scheduled to take my MCDBA in the next month or two and my Solaris Admin cert exams by the end of the year... but I won't stop there. Next year I will get my Mac certs and *attempt* to get LPI certified (gonna be a hard one for me) at which point I will re-evaluate my work/home situation and decide if it's time for a move. I, too, love computers.
     
     
  12. XtR-X

    XtR-X TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 1,040

    I also hate programming. I can get very good at it if I tried, but when I take school-based programming, I always do bad. I learned PHP and some MySQL to some extent on my own and I am learning C++ on my own also.

    Wow, man, you just keep goin'. You gonna go for CCIE after CCNP?
     
  13. Phantasm66

    Phantasm66 TS Rookie Posts: 6,504   +6

    I am not that into Cisco. Actually, I kind of regret focussing too much on operating systems and networking for the past 5 years, and am looking more at programming in C++, particularly client server network programming.

    But I've done enough of Cisco to be able to hold my own in a conversation - pretty much CCNP level, i.e. advanced routing protocols, switches, WAN technologies like frame relay, etc. I've stopped at round about the level where they were on about spanning trees, etc. I didn't stop because I found it too hard, rather too dry.

    My interests now lie in learning more about network programming, and in writing parallel code for UNIX clusters, but I am constantly working on a number of projects both at home and at work.

    My goal for the next couple of years is to master the above, and also to become better all round in administration AND development. I am trying to set myself up for getting a quite high powered job for during my 30s.
     
  14. XtR-X

    XtR-X TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 1,040

    I read that 3% of CCNP's only make it to CCIE every year. That's so little... I bet you could make it there...

    Wow, you know more than probably any one else on these boards... but... you still think you know so little (as recalled from other posts).
     
  15. Phantasm66

    Phantasm66 TS Rookie Posts: 6,504   +6

    We all know very little.

    A CCIE is a Cisco GOD. A Deity. There's not many of them around and they are pretty hard. I would not pick a fight with one in a hurry. Sort of a little like the balrog in Lord of the Rings.
     
  16. Greeno

    Greeno TS Rookie Posts: 394

    I agree you'll never stop learning, and why should we? Everyone wants to be useful don't they?

    So far as MCSE's go etc... I did one and I couldnt be arsed renewing bits and pieces all the time, cos eventually it was gonna come to that. So i'm not now :p

    Why I remember the NT tracks now, but what good is that now? no use, apart from in theory.

    I'm far more use to my company for what I can do, not what I know or supposedly know... and my opinion on that will never change I don't think.
     
  17. StormBringer

    StormBringer TS Rookie Posts: 2,871

    Indeed :grinthumb
     
  18. Arris

    Arris TS Evangelist Posts: 4,604   +110

    BSc Computer Science (Bachelor of Science in computing, University Degree)
     
  19. Phantasm66

    Phantasm66 TS Rookie Posts: 6,504   +6

    What did you do your honors project in?
     
  20. Mictlantecuhtli

    Mictlantecuhtli TS Evangelist Posts: 4,916   +9

     
  21. bogeyman

    bogeyman TS Rookie

    Bogeyman

    This is my 1st computer class. I have been working on them and in them since 1985. I have a BSEd and MSEd in Art/History then Counseling Psych., then Post Grad work. I am a Geezer of 70 yrs and this is my 65th year in school. Most of computers I have learned by myself and asking questions. In the Navy, however, I was an Aviation Electroncs Technician. This is a horse of a different color.

    Bogeyman
     
  22. RealBlackStuff

    RealBlackStuff TS Rookie Posts: 8,165

    I never finished highschool, but I speak six languages fluently, and can understand, read and write a few more.
    I learned for car mechanic. When I moved cities, fate put me in an apartment next to someone who worked for IBM. I got interested in computers (mainframes), got a job with IBM and the rest is history.

    Function: Senior Analyst-Programmer on Mainframes
    IT-Experience: Since 1968
    Systems: mostly IBM Host (from the [8KB Memory] IBM 1401, via S/360, to MVS S/390), UNISYS Host 1100/2200 (TIP & HVTIP), ICL Systems 10 & 25
    DB-Systems: DB2 (full SQL), IMS-DB, VSAM
    DC-Systems: TSO (ISPF), JCL, IMS, CICS
    SW-Tools & Methods: Expediter, DumpMaster, Endevor, Easytrieve, FileAid, Changeman, Structured programming, Interactive programming, Jackson Design
    Programming languages: COBOL, COBOL II, COBOL MVS (Language Environment), Microfocus-, Meta-, Delta- and Jackson-COBOL, ASSEMBLER, PL/1, REXX
    Applications worked on: Data Warehousing, Stock Exchange functions, Year 2000 Conversion, Credit Management, Monetary Traffic, Portfolios, Migration / Conversion / Data Transfer, Parts Department Management, Inventory, Invoicing, Bookkeeping, Statistics, Ordering and Shipping, Videotext-Applications, Management Info-Systems

    I was contracting since 1985, and retired in 2002.

    My PC knowledge is based purely on a hobby and need-to-know level.
     


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...


Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.