I don't want to be that guy, so I'll introduce myself

By badsearcher
Nov 15, 2008
  1. Well, I don't want to be that guy who just comes in and pops in only when he needs something. So I'll introduce myself and even pledge to assist someone with a problem if I can help (although I consider myself tech-savvy I don't really have any particular computer problem solving training so usually what I do for myself, running utilities, reinstalling broken software, and general playing by ear is all I can really offer).

    What I am as far as computers are concerned? Well I am a 3d modeling and animation student (modeling at this point in my academic career seems to be more of a strong suit) who works in Maya but originally got his start in poser. Poser for those of you who know is really not a software that one can expect to do anything substantial with in their life. Fun yes, easy yes, professional level, no (or some will argue yes but that's usually after the assumed five hours of photoshop). Maya is something that I know I can do for a career for the rest of my life just because the thought of the basic mechanics, doing what to a passive observer would look like mundane work is enough to excite me.

    Other than that, as far as what I've achieved in keeping my old box together? Well I've built my own computers since I was 11, never concerned myself with the whole warranty (you get warranty for individual parts) and tech support (you become smart enough to be your own tech support from building your own computers, and also individual hardware manufacturers provide tech support if you can figure out at the least what hardware is causing your problem) business.

    Although I will confess that I wanted to have a panic attack when I bought the parts for my most recent computer and after excitedly assembling everything (coincidentally everything had come the same day, so I made an evening of it) I pressed the power switch and nothing happened. I say panic attack because it's not like I upgraded one part and it wouldn't turn on, therefore knowing precisely what part was causing problems, in the case of the fresh computer one doesn't know what it was because it could be anything (and I will also confess that I had bought a used dual core processor, but that wasn't the problem and I have been happily using that cpu for over a year now without a hiccup).

    I eventually ended scanning the manual down to every jumper and wire to make sure I didn't fudge anything up and I isolated the problem to a jumper into which i had put a power supply wire which had no business being there (I had misread the manual). After that it turned on and I have been using it since without any problems as dramatic as that.

    And that's probably the most technically challenging problem that I faced down alone.

    That's enough of me,
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