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is my proccessor fried?

By aznskater51
Dec 15, 2005
  1. ok i just bought my new mobo and proccessor and wanted to test it up. the thing is i forgot to link up the proccessing fan to cool down the proccessor and booted it up. it worked bios screen showing then it froze. i rebooted and the screen is black. so i shut off my computer. i tried resetting cmos and no good. and its no the mobo cuz i tested and works. so im wondering if my proccessor is fried, and also booting up the proccessor was only like 20 sec then shut off. it was not like it was on for 10 minuties withtout cooling. wats the problem?
     
  2. blue_dragon

    blue_dragon TS Rookie Posts: 190

    I beleive its fried :hotbounce
    Consider this: you run electricity thru a chip with pins the size you cant even see. i would not take that much heat to melt such a thing so small. IM not sure if you can RMA (or some refund sort) it.
    TAKE THIS ANd LEARN
    NEver forget the fans
     
  3. Chamot

    Chamot TS Rookie

    I remember that back in the pre-1GHz days an Athlon T-bird would take 6 seconds to fry without cooling.. Unfortunately az, while these newer processors seem to be better at handling heat, that's possibly due to better air-cooling technology; these things still produce an incredible amount of heat, and it's essential to use them with a proper heatsink/fan.

    Good luck trying to get a replacement. :(
     
  4. k1n9k00p4

    k1n9k00p4 TS Rookie Posts: 90

    Bummer dude,

    my friend did the same thing

    *FOGHORN :D

    NEXT TIME DONT FORGETT TO INSTALL YOUR CPU FAN!!!
     
  5. Justin

    Justin TS Rookie Posts: 942

    Was the heatsink on, but the fan not plugged in? It's unlikely you damaged a CPU if the heatsink was on. I've never seen a modern P4 or modern Athlon64 die from heat when they have a fan stoppage.

    If you just plain turned it on with nothing on it, it's definitely a possibility.


    What CPU was it, and what motherboard?
     
  6. PUTALE

    PUTALE TS Rookie Posts: 126

    a lot of modern cpu has a buildin protection mechanism to prevent overheating. it's possible that your cpu is still okay (a bit unlikely but it's possible).

    Test this, take the processor out of the socket and disconnect power to the mobo. Let it sit for awhile, like a min or two. Clear the CMOS. Then put the porcessor back in the socket and repaply the thermal grease, and put hte hsf, connect the fan. Then connect the power to the mobo. power it up, see if it works.
     
  7. truflip

    truflip TS Rookie Posts: 390

    If the heatsink was on the CPU but the fan wasnt on.. i dont think it can fry the CPU.. usually it would shut itself off to avoid overheating.. atleast the new CPU's tend to do that.. go check ur CPU n if its charcoal black.. then :p
     
  8. bigp07

    bigp07 TS Rookie Posts: 20

    Someone mentioned you can fry a CPU in a very short amout of time, it just takes a few seconds, actually. However, that is if you don'd have a heatsink. If you had a heatsink on, it definitely should not have fried in 20 seconds. Does your internal speaker beep? Do you have any lights come on on your keyboard? It could be your motherboard. If you have a friend with the same socket motherboard, swap the CPU. This next move is a little risky, and I'm sure someone's going to reply saying "Don't do it", but here it goes. A quick way to know if you have power going to your processor:
    Have someone to unplug/ turn off your CPU switch. Turn your computer on, with your finger very near or on the clean, heatsink-less CPU. It will get extremely hot within a few seconds. There shouldn't be more than 2 seconds between the time you turn on your computer and the time you swithch it off or unplug it. It'll burn the crap out of your finger if you're touching it and leave it on too long. It'll also fry itself. Sometimes, it'll look like your mobo is working properly, but my problem with my last mobo is that it was providing absoluely no power to my CPU. Yes, my PSU was working properly. Don't try it if you don't feel confident.
     
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