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Just a Question

By aman501
Dec 18, 2006
  1. I'm a real newbie so please pardon my ignorance. I've just found an interest in computer hardware and wikipedia doesn't answer all my questions.

    I was just looking at hard drives and on a high end one I saw SCSI ultra320 as the interface (this is the drive) As you can see it is an 80 pin hdd but how would one know if this would be compatible with a mobo?

    Sorry if you find me annoying, just trying to learn here...
     
  2. etgeek

    etgeek TS Rookie

    Everyone has to start someplace...

    Depending on what the motherboard supports, you might either most likely want something like this, which is the Serial ATA interface, or this. the latter is an interface called Parallel ATA. Those are the two most common interfaces. What mobo were you looking at?
     
  3. aman501

    aman501 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 27

    I really wasn't looking at any mobo in particular but when I look to see if I could find one with the ultra320 interface I couldn't find one.
     
  4. etgeek

    etgeek TS Rookie

    It seems that Newegg doesn't sell any motherboards for consumers that support that interface anymore. If I'm not mistaken, I think that the SATA is just as fast as SCSI is.. but don't quote me on it.
     
  5. Teaser261

    Teaser261 TS Rookie Posts: 121

    According to" Building a PC fo Dummies", the SCSI , also known as "scuz-zee",are mostly found in network servers and high end graphics machine. They are expensive and difficult to configure. Read chapter 11 in the book for more info.:grinthumb
     
  6. aman501

    aman501 TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 27

    oh ok, thanks you guys
     
  7. cfitzarl

    cfitzarl TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 1,975   +9

    There's no point spending that much money on a hard drive. I would look at the item that etgeek showed you.
     
  8. MetalX

    MetalX TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 1,388

    Yea, serial ATA is the way to go... SCSI is just do damned expensive.

    P.S. Yay 500th post :)
     
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