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Kansas Heart Hospital hit with ransomware, doesn't get its files decrypted after paying up

By Jos
May 24, 2016
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  1. Yet another hospital has been hit with a ransomware attack. The target this time around was Kansas Heart Hospital in Wichita. But unlike other recent attacks, the hackers didn’t fully keep up their end of the deal after receiving their ransom, only partially restoring access to files and demanding more money to decrypt the remaining data.

    The hospital refused to pay a second ransom because it was no longer “a wise maneuver or strategy.” President Greg Duick, MD says the hospital had a plan for this type of attack, helping minimizing the amount of damage done. Patient information was not endangered and routine operations were not affected, according to Duick. He declined to say how much money Kansas Heart Hospital paid, only that it was “a small amount.”

    Ransomware is becoming a common threat in the healthcare world. Earlier this year 10 Medstar facilities in the Washington region were targeted by a ransomware attack and was forced to shut down its computer system. A hospital in Los Angeles also had to pay 40 bitcoin (about $17,000) after falling victim to a similar attack in February.

    Beyond healthcare many other attacks have targeted regular users. One such example is TeslaCrypt, which first surfaced in early 2015 and was unique in that it targeted gamers by encrypting data such as save files and custom maps in addition to the usual gamut of documents. The developers behind the TeslaCrypt ransomware just recently decided to shut down the “project”, releasing a master decryption key for victims along with a note saying they are sorry. With the master key in hand, ESET has since released a decrypting tool for all TeslaCrypt variants between versions 3.0 and 4.0.

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 25, 2016
  2. OortCloud

    OortCloud TS Booster Posts: 119   +31

    Just when you thought humanity couldn't get any more disappointing...
     
    alabama man likes this.
  3. p51d007

    p51d007 TS Evangelist Posts: 908   +384

    You can bet even though no "patient information" was compromised, the government because of the HIPAA law will be taking a look.
     
  4. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TS Guardian Fighter Posts: 8,550   +2,894

    Serves them right for paying and/or not being prepared for such an attack.

    With that said; there are certain things I wouldn't wish on my enemies, and I wouldn't think twice about wishing them on these hackers. They are not just my enemy, they are everyone's enemy.
     
    mojorisin23 and alabama man like this.
  5. joefulford

    joefulford TS Enthusiast

    They were prepared for an attack. Do you work in IT? A full backup restore depending on the size of their network and file storage could easily take more than 48 hours. They were looking for a quicker solution to get up and running.
     
  6. mojorisin23

    mojorisin23 TS Booster Posts: 124   +23

    This is why... never negotiate with terrorists!

    you hear that Obama??
     
  7. Uncle Al

    Uncle Al TS Evangelist Posts: 1,663   +772

    Obama isn't the first and won't be the last. Unfortunately our leadership has grown misinformed over the past years. I think Reagan was the last that could be taken more seriously and even he had his mis-steps. This one is a potential WORLD problem and should cause governments to band together, even if on just this one issue. Considering the potential for such actions, the penalty should carry a minimum of life sentence and should even one person die because of it; a death sentence. Truly harsh, but the message must be that this kind of activity will never be tolerated.
     

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