PC boots but then dies... just newly built

By posi_scott
Feb 5, 2007
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Ok so i have a slight dilema! i just built my new computer and it boots up for about 5 seconds then shuts down

    I thought it must be an overheating problem, but i had applied a coat of thermal paste once to the heatsink...then i tried by applying a thin coat to the top of processor...same problem.

    its using a 500w power supply, but the case does have a fair bit of lights...i tried using a different heat sink cause i have an amd one and a gigabite one..both capable of my processor.

    checked the wiring..all fine i followed the manual.... im out of ideas... do u reckon id need a bigger power supply?

    its running an amd 64 3100+
    radeon gecube 256mb
    the fan has an led in it
    case has 2 lights on front
    1 gig of kingston ram 400mhz
    200gb HDD
    2 CD drives


    any ideas anyone? :(
  2. pauliewalnutz

    pauliewalnutz Newcomer, in training

    Boots for 5 seconds then shuts down? What does it do? Does it complete POST? Do you hear any beeps?

    You definitely do not need a power supply bigger than 500w.

    Try stripping machine down to bare essentials (no hd, cd, floppy, extra pci cards) and if it works add components one by one from there.
  3. JimShady23

    JimShady23 TechSpot Maniac Posts: 651

    Look Here

    I had a similar problem a few weeks ago. I can not be 100% sure if it would be the same problem as mine, a bad mobo...But taking the advice and steps listed in the below thread might save you some time rather than ordering parts you do not need.

    http://www.techspot.com/vb/topic67756.html
  4. posi_scott

    posi_scott Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    ok i get no beeps!

    im hoping its not a badmobo! it looked pretty LAgit! its a gigabyte one, usually an ok company!

    would smearing the paste on the cpu, rather than the heatsink base make a difference?

    hummmmmmm! ill have to try taking componant out at a time... i spent 3 hours putting this together today :( it all seems a waste haaha!
  5. pauliewalnutz

    pauliewalnutz Newcomer, in training

    Paste should go on the cpu, but shouldnt matter either way.

    Try taking mobo out of the case and starting if removing components doesn't do the trick.
  6. posi_scott

    posi_scott Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    well i kinda did do that, i took heatsink out, etc, and processor, and the connectors still same prob, ill try the graphics card and stuff
  7. JimShady23

    JimShady23 TechSpot Maniac Posts: 651

    HeHe

    It does not matter what brand you have.... You still can get a bad unit....

    I have an Asus, they are concidered the best by many....It still died after a week of usage.

    Giving me the same problems you are having from the get go....
  8. posi_scott

    posi_scott Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    okie dokie

    ive taken out pretty much all the componants, apart from coolling fan...processor and mobo!
    stil lsame prob, so it must be a bad mobo right? it seems almost like the socket on the mobo for the cpu fan isnt operable...
  9. nickc

    nickc TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,623

    the mobo could be shorting out if there is a washer in the wrong place.
  10. posi_scott

    posi_scott Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    a washer?
    i dont think my mobo has washers?
  11. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 20,684   +153

    You have improperly applied the thermal paste for one thing. Too much paste can cause CPU overheating. You should apply just a small amount to the center of the CPU die, not to both the die and the heatsink/fan

    How about brass standoffs? Make sure you don't have a stray standoff under the motherboard, where it could short something out
     
  12. nickc

    nickc TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,623

    that is exactally what I was talking about.
  13. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 20,684   +153

    I'm glad I could explain it a little better :) A washer is not a brass standoff. PC builders once had to use non-metallic washers, and standoffs between some of the motherboard mounting holes and the hardware used to secure the motherboard to the case. Thankfully, the mounting of motherboards has become pretty standard. 6 brass standoffs and the screws that fit in them
  14. nickc

    nickc TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,623

    actually I new that and was just using a complete novis term.
  15. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 20,684   +153

    actually I new that and was just using a complete novis term.

    Did you mean complete novice term? Are you a complete novice when it comes to computer building? Using "washer" when describing a motherboard standoff, screams very NOVICE to me
  16. posi_scott

    posi_scott Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    ok

    ok my case ,is all completly metaL , no washers came with it?
    there are like Bumps that raise the mother board, but they look metal too :S
    sooo
    i took the motherboard out of the case, all plugged in and placed it on a wood workbench
    and still the same problem! and i have removed all the paste apart from a small amount... still same problem
    im out of ideas guys :mad:
  17. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 20,684   +153

    posi_scott,
    look very carefully at the cases motherboard mounting area. These "bumps may be there, but there must also be brass standoffs near the back plane (where the keyboard and mouse connections go). These "bumps" you mention, are they removable? Do they look like they are mounted in slots? You must make sure that there are no metal "bumps" or standoffs in areas other than the motherboards mounting holes!

    Since you tested the motherboard outside the case... It is probably fried or shorted out
  18. JimShady23

    JimShady23 TechSpot Maniac Posts: 651

    Bumps Are the Standoffs

    I have used many new cheapers cases that do not come with standoffs. They are build right into the mobo tray. However I have only seen these on micro ATX cases. The steel is just raised with a screwhole in the middle. It is kind of odd, but it does save a lot of time :D So I am assuming this is the type of case he has.

    You will never see this on a mid tower or bigger because they have to conform to many differnt standards of mobo sizes. Brass standoffs are the only alternative on a midtower.
  19. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 20,684   +153

    Yes JimShady23,
    for us experienced builders, we can practically visualize the proper mounting areas of a motherboard and case, before we mount the motherboard in place. For the novice builder, mounting a motherboard may be confusing to say the least. One stray standoff can easily short out the board... Washers are never used any longer are they?

    On this type of case where the steel is raised with a screw hole in the middle, I have still seen the need for brass standoffs (maybe just one or two) near the keyboard and mouse connections of a given motherboard. ATX or miniATX...
  20. posi_scott

    posi_scott Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    ok it has raised steel bumps with the screw hole like u mentioned, i see no brass... at all!! so are these metal bumps causing my mobo to short out? it cant be fried cus it turns on for a few seconds....
  21. foozy

    foozy Newcomer, in training Posts: 267

    Fried motherboards can do plenty of odd things, not turning on is just the most common.

    Does the motherboard fit your I/O shield correctly? I/O mis-fits are usually a good indication of standoff or mounting problems.

    Here's the main worry when you're putting in your motherboard: are there any circuits on the motherboard that are in any way coming into contact with the case? Those "bumps" that the motherboard sits on serve the purpose of suspending the motherboard away from the case.

    Considering you started the board up on a workbench, I'm betting that you don't fully realize how electrical shorts work. I would try getting a new motherboard and having a professional install it as well as the CPU.
  22. beef_jerky4104

    beef_jerky4104 Banned Posts: 1,094

    I had the same issue it was caused by an underpowered power supply.

    Upgrade and the problems may go away.

    Note: Please speak better english.
  23. JRaml

    JRaml Newcomer, in training Posts: 16

    Ram!!!

    In case I missed it... did you remove the RAM and try powering up? The reason I ask is when I started my first build in Nov. I bought an Asus P5n-SLI board, which turns out wasn't compatible with OCZ RAM. I wasn't able to POST. Try checking the manufacturer's website for a compatibility list.

    Otherwise it sounds like a bad mobo. If you don't get any beeps at all that is a problem. Also check to see if there is a green light that's on, on the mobo itself. If it's not on when you power it up its fried.
  24. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 20,684   +153

    These "bumps" should be configured for both ATX and miniATX motherboards. If you have an ATX board all the "bumps" would be used. If you have a miniATX board all but two or three "bumps" would be used and the unused "bumps" would not be under the miniATX board. As long as you position the motherboard properly with the keyboard, and mouse ports through the back of the case, everything will be ok
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...


Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.