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PC not working using GPU

By Sourav
Feb 28, 2015
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  1. It was like any other day while I was working on the computer, while my PC suddenly shut down. I tried turning it back on, but nothing. So, I opened up the case and noticed that when I press the power button, not even the motherboard fan starts spinning.
    I stripped down everything from the system and tried running it. It worked flawlessly. So, after putting everything back on, one by one, the culprit turned out to be the Graphics card. The computer would turn on with the card inserted into the PCI slot. Whenever I would place it in there (not even connected with the VGA cable, just plugged in the slot), the motherboard would refuse to start up.
    So, I decided to check the GPU for cylinder holes, but everything seemed to be intact, no burnt smell, or anything. The PC works just fine with the integrated graphics.
    Can it really just die like that without a proper reason? It wasn't over-heating, I had that one checked.
    So, what should I do right now? I don't have a spare GPU to check if it's the PCI slot that's the problem or the GPU, which was fine like 10 minutes ago.
     
  2. Perun

    Perun TS Rookie

    Hmm, what graphics card are you using ? It might be that your power supply lost it's wattage over time, and that it's now not strong enough to power it. How much W does your PSU give ?
     
  3. Sourav

    Sourav TS Rookie Topic Starter

    PSU is 450 Watts since it's a pretty old rig. The GPU is AMD 6670 1 GB DDR5. The PSU used to run the card flawlessly, I don't understand how it just lost it's power. Anyway, I'll have the card checked into my friend's system tomorrow, and see if it works or not.[​IMG]
    Here's a shot of the voltages (I don't know if that helps).
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2015
  4. Perun

    Perun TS Rookie

    Take a look at the +12V rail, it seems to be running at 8V ! You can try using your friends PSU just to make sure, but I'm 90% positive that the PSU is faulty. Do you happen to have a multimeter/voltmeter on you ? You might want to double check that +12V rail ( It's the blue wire )
     
    Sourav likes this.
  5. Sourav

    Sourav TS Rookie Topic Starter

    Oh my god! You're right. I didn't even notice the +12V rail! Sorry for my sloppiness. I don't have a voltmeter around. I'll check with my friend's PSU first thing tomorrow. Thanks for your help!
    And Arjun Parihar? What the hell? XD
     
    Perun likes this.
  6. Perun

    Perun TS Rookie

    No problem, I just hope I helped :)
     
  7. Sourav

    Sourav TS Rookie Topic Starter

    So, I couldn't get in touch with my friend to check with his PSU. But what bothers me is that, the Voltage is showing 12V on SpeedFan. I went to BIOS and checked there too. It was 12V. So, could it be that it was just a wrong information shown by CPUID HW Monitor? Here's the SpeedFan screenshot:
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Perun

    Perun TS Rookie

    Hmm, could be, the BIOS readout at least should be correct. I'm guessing you don't have any other PCI-E slots you can try out ? Maybe try fiddling around the BIOS and perhaps try to disable the onboard graphics ( although that shouldn't be an issue ) Try setting your main graphics adapter to PCI-E,if you have that option, but it would really help determine the problem if you tested with another PSU / GPU
     
  9. Sourav

    Sourav TS Rookie Topic Starter

    So, this just happened. I plugged the GPU in my friend's working PC, and the same thing. The motherboard refused to start up. I guess it really is that my GPU is dead? It doesn't have any cylinder holes or any burning marks or anything. I would've been happy if it was the PSU that was faulty really >.<
     
  10. Perun

    Perun TS Rookie

    Well, sadly it seems that the GPU is 99.99% broken. How old would you say it was ? Some old-ish cards tend to have bad solder on chips which dries out and loses connection. You could try "baking" it in the oven. I've fixed one of my old cards that way, but if you have a hot air gun, that would perhaps be a better alternative. As for baking, just google it, you should find quite a few tutorials & explanations, but do that only as a last resort.
     
  11. Sourav

    Sourav TS Rookie Topic Starter

    The card is about 2 years old. Are you sure about baking the card? I assumed those were troll posts. Shouldn't so much heat be bad for the card?
     
  12. Perun

    Perun TS Rookie

    I thought it was trolling too, until I gathered sufficient "evidence". The point in baking is to bake it enough for the solder to melt, but not enough to destroy the entire circuitry ( you have to remove all coolers & radiators pre-baking of course). You have to set it to the exact temperature as specified, and bake it the exact amount of time. Other than that you could try "melting" every chip one by one with a hot-air gun, but I cannot tell you more about this method as I haven't tried it out. but it seems to work the same way. All in all, don't do this if you think you can fix it otherwise.
     
  13. Sourav

    Sourav TS Rookie Topic Starter

    Okay, I'll see if there's any other way. If not (probably), I'll give this a shot. Thanks :)
     

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