TechSpot

Rant... amd setup is better

By onesmartidiot
Jan 5, 2008
  1. i assembled my buddys core 2 duo system a year ago, and didnt like the plastic tabs intel used to connect the heatsink to the mobo.

    i assembled my core 2 duo last night, and am greatly disgusted by this design. it puts alot of pressure on the board, seems to me like it had a slight bow in it.

    i just dont get why they did this... maybe amd had a patent on their cpu heatsink design..

    i loved the way my Athlon 64 used a metal plate on the back of the board... it spread out the pressure and gave me alot more confidence when clicking the pressure bar down into place.

    i was half worried i was gonna snap my board with this last intel...

    oh well, id rather use a poorly designed intel setup than a slow amd64 lol

    just a little rant, im curious to see other views about this.
     
  2. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 17,244   +234

    I'm sure this Intel trouble is determined by just what LGA 775 CPU heatsink is used. That metal backplate you love so much is on my Intel LGA775 too...

    Rant, rant, rant onesmart*****
     
  3. onesmartidiot

    onesmartidiot TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 95

    its just the stock intel heatsink and fan, just like i used the stock amd heatsink and fan.

    do you have a diff stock fan than me or are you aftermarket?
    edit
    -----
    this is lga775 system #2 i have built within a year (exactly) of eachother.

    both had this crappy setup.
     
  4. Tedster

    Tedster Techspot old timer..... Posts: 6,000   +15

    have you looked at other mobo maker boards for intel CPUs?
     
  5. onesmartidiot

    onesmartidiot TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 95

    what do you mean?

    on a board i look at the specs that matter most, and the cost. I didnt think some boards had the backplate option. I just know the first board i used was an intel 965g and this one is a biostar..something.

    it was cheap and was up in specs with the high end boards.

    in spring when i build my quad core system i will pay attention to how the processor heatsink mounts. and will be on here asking for the best board possible, without an excessive cost.

    tmagic: what board are you running? im curious to see the setup.
     
  6. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 17,244   +234

    I use an aftermarket CPU heatsink/fan, like Zalman or others. I never use the stock coolers. They are cheap and they do a poor job of cooling

    This is an example of what I use:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835887012

    All LGA 775 boards regardless of who makes them, can use the backplate type heatsinks. Both Intel and AMD64's can use the backplates. Stop blaming Intel for not using backplates. Just stop using the supplied HSF's
     
  7. Samstoned

    Samstoned TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,018

    ones Ive built and seen all use a backplate spring and the heatsink screws down to standoff's on the other side
    the board does not hold the weight of heatsink at all
    and knitting and knitting:slurp:
     
  8. onesmartidiot

    onesmartidiot TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 95

    that sounds nice.

    ill deff look at aftermarket cooling on my next rig.

    however my rant still holds true then, amds athlon 64 stock setup beats intels c2d setup!

    lol
     
  9. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 17,244   +234

    Yes Samstoned,
    what you describe is the ideal way of supporting an HSF assembly
     
  10. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 17,244   +234

    Stock vs. Stock, yes I can see your point. I have 4 or 5 stock Intel 775 HSF's sitting on a shelf. I replace them for excessive noise too.

    The C2D setup is exactly like the single core Intel 775's
     
  11. Tedster

    Tedster Techspot old timer..... Posts: 6,000   +15

    you can't always go by price. You have to look at the features as well as the options you want. If you needed a backplate, then look at mobos that offer it.
    Price doesn't necessarily dictate quality or options desired.
     
  12. captaincranky

    captaincranky TechSpot Addict Posts: 11,684   +1,877

    This is what I don't understand.....

    I have no idea why everybody complains about the Intel socket LGA 775 HSF push pin mounting. The pins lock-up for me almost before I want them to. Just make sure the HSF fan is flush and flat on the CPU and the pins are directly over the holes.

    Disclaimer: My experience has been with Intel and Foxconn boards. So that's basically Intel and Intel boards. I don't know if other manufacturers are implementing the bolt pattern and board thickness standards correctly. Also, there is the possible difference in mounting arm tension between HSFs. Here I've had stock Intel and Coolermaster both of which hooked up instantly.

    Many brands of HSFs offer a bolt-on option. (These are, in many cases, universal fit items). The "Blue-Orb" springs to mind. However, as soon as anybody buys one of this type HSF, they immediately begin to complain bitterly that the Mobo must be removed to install it. Let's recap, the Intel mount isn't any good, and the bolt on is too much trouble. Might I offer what's behind door number three? Take it to a shop.
     
  13. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 17,244   +234

    "Disclaimer: My experience has been with Intel and Foxconn boards. So that's basically Intel and Intel boards. I don't know if other manufacturers are implementing the bolt pattern and board thickness standards correctly. Also, there is the possible difference in mounting arm tension between HSFs. Here I've had stock Intel and Coolermaster both of which hooked up instantly"...

    That's right captaincranky,
    I'm sure the hole patterns are all the same in any make LGA775 motherboard. Motherboard thickness is not the same. It seems the the 775 motherboards under the $90 range are thinner, and those push pin 775 HSF's can really bow those boards...

    "you can't always go by price. You have to look at the features as well as the options you want. If you needed a backplate, then look at mobos that offer it. Price doesn't necessarily dictate quality or options desired"...

    Tedster,
    are CPU HSF backplates offered with motherboards? I thought they were only part of an after-market HSF. Afterall, the HSF's come with a retail boxed CPU...
     
  14. captaincranky

    captaincranky TechSpot Addict Posts: 11,684   +1,877

    Almost Only Counts in Horseshoes and Hand Grenades......

    (Or so I've been led to believe).

    I read so many CPU and HSF reviews, and the statements that are always in the forefront are; "I thought I was going to break the mobo", or, "I almost broke the mobo". I don't recall reading "I broke my motherboard". I'm not saying that those statements don't exist, just that I've never seen them.

    I think we need to be reasonably aware that the first time is the hardest, and that not all of us may not possess the manual dexterity to pull this off smoothly. How often does the average user build a computer? For a tech, this might be everyday for the rest of us it might be once only.

    I have read so stupid things like, "I struggled with this thing for an hour, then I realized the pins were rotated to the unlocked position". Gosh, pay attention.

    I have done really stupid things and broken stuff so I'm not trying to be arrogant. It's possible that the HSF fan on my next build may give me trouble, who knows?

    Let me try to post something constructive here:

    The taper on the push-pins should help. They can be used as, what's known in the mechanical trades as a "drift pin". As you gradually and gently push the pins further into the holes, you also should be allowing the HSF to gently move (rotate and/or shift into a position where the pins are absolutely vertical and centered over they holes, if this is true, then they will practically fall in. You should be applying GENTLE pressure directly at the center of the unit, ant deviation wherein the CPU and board are not exactly parallel with the HSF will prevent it's attachment. I honestly believe that panic and impatience are the enemies of this process, and a deep breath and a little time out will make things go much smoother.
     
  15. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 17,244   +234

    Well said captaincranky,
    I struggled a bit with my first push pin LGA 775 HSF install. The pins kept popping out of the MSI motherboard. After the first, I got pretty good. I still prefer the backplate 775 HSF's. The heatsink's spring-loaded screws go into the backplate easily, without bowing the motherboard
     
  16. captaincranky

    captaincranky TechSpot Addict Posts: 11,684   +1,877

    6 of one half a dozen of the other.....

    Tmagic650 I know you wouldn't complain about taking the mobo out to do it your way. I salute you.
     
  17. MetalX

    MetalX TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 1,388

    I remember having to use much more force than I thought should have been necessary to install the heatsink on my P5B Deluxe, but the motherboard isn't bending very much at all.
     
  18. onesmartidiot

    onesmartidiot TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 95

    maybe the bowing is because its a cheap thin board compared to the first lga board i built that was intel.
     
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