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Restoring overwritten partition table?

By mscrx
Jan 31, 2008
  1. hi guys

    today when I switched on my laptop and the attached maxtor 500gig I got a popup which told me that my maxtor is not formatted and if I want to do it right now.
    I clicked cancel, removed the drive and put it to another usb port with the same result.
    then I tried a different laptop with the same result and thought ok thats it with the drive and its just 300gig of data I need...
    then I remembered what I did yesterday. I tried to make an usb flash drive bootable with the hp tool (HPUSBF.exe). usually no problem but the drive was connected as well. I bought Partition Table Doctor from the internet and it tells me that the drive is marked as a Win95 Fat16. so it sounds conclusive that the hp tool caused the damage.
    my question would be if there is a chance to reverse what the hp tool did.
    at the moment partition table doc runs and runs and searches for the old table but doesn't look good as far as I see that.

    thanks for help!
     
  2. mscrx

    mscrx TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 310

    ok, solved. sorry for server space waste!

    solution was to set the partition table system id back to 07:NTFS/HPFS and run fixboot again.
    I highly recommend this software even if its not freeware! Partition Table Doctor

    cheers, mscrx
     
  3. kimsland

    kimsland Ex-TechSpotter Posts: 14,524

    Does Partition Table Doctor have any repair or restore backup option?

    For a drive to be seen in Windows the drive must be Type 05 (extended partition)
    You can use Partition magic ptedit32.exe or better yet gpart to fix the error.
    But I cannot confirm if data loss due to change (but all the ones I've done worked without data loss)

    FYI A list of partition types and numbers:
    ==========================================

    # 00 - Freespace
    # 01 - FAT12 (< 16 MiB)
    # 02 - XENIX root file system
    # 03 - XENIX /usr file system (obsolete)
    # 04 - FAT16 (< 32 MiB)
    # 05 - Extended (chain)
    # 06 - FAT16B (> 32 MiB)
    # 07 - Installable (HPFS or NTFS); QNX; Advanced Unix
    # 08 - AIX; SplitDrive; OS/2 (through Version 1.3); Dell spanning multiple drives (array); Commodore DOS
    # 09 - AIX; Coherent; QNX
    # 0A - IBM Boot Manager; Coherent swap; OPUS
    # 0B - FAT32
    # 0C - FAT32X (INT13X)
    # 0E - FAT16X (INT13X)
    # 0F - Extended X (> 7.8 MiB)
    # 11 - Hidden FAT12
    # 12 - Compaq diagnostics
    # 14 - Hidden FAT16; AST DOS with logical sectored FAT
    # 16 - Hidden FAT16B
    # 17 - Hidden Installable (HPFS or NTFS)
    # 18 - AST Windows swap file
    # 19 - Willowtech Photon coS
    # 1B - Hidden FAT32
    # 1C - Hidden FAT32X
    # 1E - Hidden FAT16X
    # 20 - Willowsoft Overture File System (OFS1)
    # 21 - officially listed as reserved (HP Volume Expansion, SpeedStor variant)
    # 21 - Oxygen FSo2
    # 22 - Oxygen Extended
    # 23 - officially listed as reserved (HP Volume Expansion, SpeedStor variant?)
    # 24 - NEC MS-DOS 3.x
    # 26 - officially listed as reserved (HP Volume Expansion, SpeedStor variant?)
    # 31 - officially listed as reserved (HP Volume Expansion, SpeedStor variant?)
    # 33 - officially listed as reserved (HP Volume Expansion, SpeedStor variant?)
    # 34 - officially listed as reserved (HP Volume Expansion, SpeedStor variant?)
    # 36 - officially listed as reserved (HP Volume Expansion, SpeedStor variant?)
    # 38 - Theos
    # 3C - PowerQuest recoverable
    # 3D - Hidden NetWare
    # 40 - VENIX 80286
    # 41 - Personal RISC Boot; PowerPC boot; PTS-DOS 6.70 & BootWizard: Alternative Linux, Minix, & DR-DOS
    # 42 - Secure File System; Windows 2000 (NT 5): Dynamic extended; PTS-DOS 6.70 & BootWizard: Alternative Linux swap & DR-DOS
    # 43 - Alternative Linux native file system (ext2fs); PTS-DOS 6.70 & BootWizard: DR-DOS
    # 45 - Priam
    # 45 - EUMEL/Elan
    # 46 - EUMEL/Elan
    # 47 - EUMEL/Elan
    # 48 - EUMEL/Elan
    # 4A - ALFS/THIN lightweight filesystem for DOS
    # 4D - QNX
    # 4E - QNX
    # 4F - QNX; Oberon boot/data
    # 50 - Ontrack Disk Manager, read-only, FAT (Logical sector size varies)
    # 51 - Ontrack Disk Manager, read/write, FAT (Logical sector size varies)
    # 51 - Novell
    # 52 - CP/M
    # 52 - Microport System V/386
    # 53 - Ontrack Disk Manager
    # 54 - Ontrack Disk Manager 6.0
    # 55 - EZ-Drive 3.05
    # 56 - Golden Bow VFeature
    # 5C - Priam EDISK
    # 61 - Storage Dimensions SpeedStor
    # 63 - GNU HURD
    # 63 - Mach, MtXinu BSD 4.2 on Mach; Unix Sys V/386, 386/ix
    # 64 - Novell Netware 286
    # 65 - Novell Netware 3.11 & 4.1
    # 66 - Novell Netware 386
    # 67 - Novell Netware
    # 68 - Novell Netware
    # 69 - Novell Netware 5+; Novell Storage Services
    # 70 - DiskSecure Multi-Boot
    # 75 - IBM PC/IX
    # 80 - Minix v1.1 - 1.4a; Old MINIX (Linux)
    # 81 - Linux/Minix v1.4b+; Mitac Advanced Disk Manager
    # 82 - Linux swap; Prime; Solaris
    # 83 - Linux ext2
    # 84 - OS/2 hiding type 04; APM hibernation, can be used by Win98
    # 86 - NT FAT volume set
    # 87 - HPFS FT mirrored; NT IFS volume set
    # 93 - Hidden Linux ext2; Amoeba file system
    # 94 - Amoeba bad block table
    # 99 - Mylex EISA SCSI
    # 9F - BSDI
    # A0 - Phoenix NoteBios Power Management "Save to Disk"; IBM hibernation
    # A1 - HP Volume Expansion (SpeedStor variant)
    # A3 - HP Volume Expansion (SpeedStor variant)
    # A4 - HP Volume Expansion (SpeedStor variant)
    # A5 - FreeBSD/386
    # A6 - OpenBSD
    # A6 - HP Volume Expansion (SpeedStor variant)
    # A7 - NextStep
    # A9 - NetBSD
    # AA - Olivetti DOS with FAT12
    # B0 - part of Bootmanager BootStar by Star-Tools GmbH
    # B1 - HP Volume Expansion (SpeedStor variant)
    # B3 - HP Volume Expansion (SpeedStor variant)
    # B4 - HP Volume Expansion (SpeedStor variant)
    # B6 - HP Volume Expansion (SpeedStor variant)
    # B7 - BSDI file system or secondarily swap
    # B8 - BSDI swap or secondarily file system
    # BB - PTS BootWizard
    # BE - Solaris boot
    # C0 - Novell DOS/OpenDOS/DR-OpenDOS/DR-DOS secured; CTOS
    # C1 - DR-DOS 6.0 LOGIN.EXE-secured 12-bit FAT
    # C2 - Reserved for DR-DOS 7+
    # C3 - Reserved for DR-DOS 7+
    # C4 - DR-DOS 6.0 LOGIN.EXE-secured 16-bit FAT
    # C6 - Disabled NT FAT volume set
    # C7 - Disabled NT IFS volume set; Syrinx/Cyrnix
    # C8 - Reserved for DR-DOS 7+
    # C9 - Reserved for DR-DOS 7+
    # CA - Reserved for DR-DOS 7+
    # CB - Reserved for DR-DOS secured FAT32
    # CC - Reserved for DR-DOS secured FAT32X (LBA)
    # CD - Reserved for DR-DOS 7+
    # CE - Reserved for DR-DOS secured FAT16X (LBA)
    # CF - Reserved for DR-DOS secured extended (LBA)
    # D0 - Multiuser DOS secured (FAT12)
    # D1 - Old Multiuser DOS secured FAT12
    # D4 - Old Multiuser DOS secured FAT16 (<= 32M)
    # D5 - Old Multiuser DOS secured extended
    # D6 - Old Multiuser DOS secured FAT16 (BIGDOS > 32 Mb)
    # D8 - CP/M 86
    # DB - CP/M, Concurrent CP/M, Concurrent DOS; CTOS (Convergent Technologies OS)
    # DE - Dell
    # DF BootIt EMBRM
    # E1 - SpeedStor 12-bit FAT extended
    # E1 - DOS access (Linux)
    # E2 - DOS read-only (Florian Painke's XFDISK 1.0.4)
    # E3 - SpeedStor (Norton, Linux says DOS R/O)
    # E4 - SpeedStor 16-bit FAT extended
    # E5 - Tandy DOS with logical sectored FAT
    # E6 - Storage Dimensions SpeedStor
    # EB - BeOS
    # ED - Reserved for Matthias Paul's Spryt*x
    # F1 - SpeedStor Dimensions
    # F2 - DOS 3.3+ second
    # F2 - Unisys DOS with logical sectored FAT
    # F3 - Storage Dimensions SpeedStor
    # F4 - SpeedStor Storage Dimensions
    # F5 - Prologue
    # F6 - Storage Dimensions SpeedStor
    # FD - Reserved for FreeDOS
    # FE - PS/2 IML (Initial Microcode Load); LANstep; Storage Dimensions SpeedStor
    # FF - Xenix bad-block table

    Apologies posted when you posted, oh well I'll leave this info for others to use as reference
     
  4. mscrx

    mscrx TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 310

    thanks for the detailed info even though I already found a fix with #07
     
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