Slow computer after removing Nvidia drivers.

By Simonss
Jan 10, 2007
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  1. I agree that I must have cleared out all the spyware however my computer was running extremely slowly again after all this.

    I am linking it to using Driver Cleaner to remove the Nvidia display and motherboard drivers as I was getting random BSOD's that, from googling could have been a bad nvidia driver installation.

    I gave up on that installation and very very slowly...due to the pc!....backed up and installed Windows XP. Everything since then had been running fine until yesterday. Computer started freezing or rebooting without warning.

    Did a memtest and found that one of ym RAM sticks was giving errors so I removed it. The problem did not go away so after looking in depth into the Event Viewer for when the crashes occur I noticed that nvatabus was logged in the event viewer three times with "Device Identified" prior to each reboot.

    So off I went and uninstalled the nvidia drivers with Driver Cleaner however since that my computer now runs so so so so so slowly. I attempted to load the original drivers that came with my motherboard (Asus A7N8X-X) however this did not solve the slowness. Then attempted to install the latest again so I could have some speed and then solve the instability. Unfortunately that has not resolved this either.

    I have done a full test by seagate, the manu for my two HD's and they are both fine.

    If this topic should be moved then fair enough - just wanted to link it in to my previous issues.

    Any help would be much appreciated.

    Simon

    Edit: previous thread can be found HERE.
  2. howard_hopkinso

    howard_hopkinso Newcomer, in training Posts: 25,948   +19

    I have moved the last post in your previous thread to it`s own thread in our Windows OS forum.

    It seems your problems are now driver related.

    The nvatabus file is a known issue. If you do a Google search, you`ll see what I mean. I suggest you contact Nvidia and see if they have a solution for you.

    Regards Howard :)
  3. Simonss

    Simonss Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    Cheers howard.

    Currently have a copy of the ASUS 1.16 mobo drivers and will try them when I get home. Here's hoping it works....cant believe the luck ive been having lately!
  4. Simonss

    Simonss Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    Tried to install the ASUS drivers but PC was rebooting continually before loading windows, at random points.

    Had a good look at the motherboard and noticed that one of the capacitors had gone. Looked similar to this - http://www.lemis.com/grog/Photos/20030917/small/echunga-capacitors.jpeg

    Took the stuff off the top of the capacitor and pushed on it a bit and heard what sounded like air rushing from the capacitor.

    Have ordered a replacement motherboard which should arrive Friday.

    I wonder if I was getting the nvatabus problem from this? It seems odd that the PC will load and run ok for times when a capacitor has gone.

    For those that are interested, looking at this image the capacitor that went was the central capacitor of the five in a vertical line beside the CPU bit.

    http://www.aezay.dk/imgs/asus-a7n8x-deluxe.jpg
  5. N3051M

    N3051M Newcomer, in training Posts: 2,800

    anything that disrupts the logical/controlled flow of electricity can cause unpredictable things to happen.
  6. Simonss

    Simonss Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    Well after taking the motherboard out of the case I noticed that three of the parts where the PSU connects to the motherboard were burnt. On checking the PSU connector it has melted in one part and doesn't look too good.

    Its a thermaltake purepower 420w

    The connector looks bit like this - same two pins in top left are badly damaged...

    http://webhelp.org/jonnyguru/mishaps/damagedBoards/images/burnt-ps-conn.jpg

    Whats the best way to test this PSU? I wouldn't want to put in a new mobo and for the PSU to blow it up....
  7. N3051M

    N3051M Newcomer, in training Posts: 2,800

    well to test it, i really don't know, apart from probably sending it in to one of those shops or back to the manufacturer, or setting up one of those rigs (no idea what they're called or how-to)

    That does look pretty bad.. i wouldn't use it on any sort of equipment, not until you chop that connector block off and replace it with another undamaged one, soldered or crimped properly might i add. But even then....
  8. Simonss

    Simonss Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    I have an old 350w rubbish PSU that has been used and still works so im going to use that with my new motherboard until i work out what PSU to replace the thermaltake with.

    I did a very technical 'sniff test' - Smelt the fan on the PSU and I dont think it smells good. Comparing it to the old PSU I had lying around there is a definite burnt scent to it.

    Im thinking maybe it was the PSU (bought in late 2003 so not *that* old) that had gone and was causing the issues with BSOD's etc and then it burnt out taking the motherboard with it.
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