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'Super Russian Roulette' is a modern party game for the NES

By Shawn Knight
Feb 26, 2016
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  1. The idea of creating a new game for a console that's well over 30 years old may seem ludicrous to some but electrical engineer Andrew Reitano is proof that it certainly can be done. His game, Super Russian Roulette for the Nintendo Entertainment System, has already blown past its funding goal of $20,000 and is showing no signs of slowing down.

    Super Russian Roulette is a party game designed to be played with the NES Zapper and a group of friends. It features a loud-mouth cowboy that guides players through the high-risk game of chance. The title is far from the family-friendly themes typically associated with the NES but that's part of the fun.

    To really understand what the game is about, I'd suggest watching the Kickstarter promo clip above.

    On the subject of its "sensitive" nature, Reitano told Polygon that he never intended to associate the game with the real life horror and desperation of taking one's own life. It's a dark game of chance, he added, but it's never played alone and always played voluntarily. Reitano said he would never want to upset anyone.

    Those interested in backing the game will need to pledge at least $55 to guarantee a standard (grey) copy of Super Russian Roulette. For a bit more scratch, you can reserve a limited edition black game cartridge complete with alternate label. These are numbered carts (only 100 are being made) that are forecasted to arrive by December of this year.

    Reitano also offers a couple of high-end tiers, one of which allows you to be the cowboy in the game and record your own audio.

    Permalink to story.

     
  2. J spot

    J spot TS Enthusiast Posts: 60   +18

    I wonder how much memory the game uses. I've always wonder how old SNES, Nintendo games would look like, if developed today, with the price of memory being cheaper. I'm sure there are other limitations, but a game could have more frames of animations, voices, etc.
     
  3. Technician

    Technician TS Addict Posts: 677   +113

    Once out of six times, the toy gun fires an actual laser pulse of 60,000 watts. Don't stand beside the active player. Good game.
    I am thinking this is the stupidest game concept ever. Wouldn't all the players just shoot the cowboy? Is anyone dumb enough to put a gun to their own head? I doubt it seriously, if they are that dumb, they are probably already gone.
     
    ikesmasher likes this.
  4. Stalepie

    Stalepie TS Rookie

    This looks fantastic. I'm so glad to see homebrew developers coming up with more than just demos and ports, but full original games!!
     
  5. Technician

    Technician TS Addict Posts: 677   +113

    I can't tell if you are being sarcastic or serious, I hope it's not the latter.
     
  6. Adhmuz

    Adhmuz TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,648   +521

    Well, it's a game that your playing with other people so says the article, so they would see you not shoot yourself. Although you technically don't have to be pointing the gun at yourself anyway, just fire it straight up, if it's blank you keep playing, if it's not your out of the game.

    I see this being adopted into a drinking game to make it actually worth playing, Russian Roulette without the risk factor is pointless anyways, it would be more interesting for the gun to emit an electric shock to the person holding it for example, but at that point it doesn't need to be a gun and wouldn't be considered Russian Roulette either.
     
  7. Emexrulsier

    Emexrulsier TS Guru Posts: 508   +45

    Take for example the snes first, zelda a link to the past. This game is about 256Kb which includes the entire games, music and sound effects. You don't have to imagine what they would look like if developed today just look at any modern game. Many of these have only been made possible because of the advances in data storage not just the amount we can store but the physical size of the device. You compare a snes cartridge to a 256Gb V-Nand and you are moving into the realm of 10s of Terabytes of storage.

    In the 60s they used to use something called core store memory module. They look similar in size to 2 or 3 stacked 3.5" HDD with a couple of heatpipes. Each one could store around 1Kb. If you were to store 128Gb of data in the 60s the total weight of all the devices would weigh a staggering 140,248 metric tonnes which is around 6 1/2 royal aircraft carriers!
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2016
  8. SNGX1275

    SNGX1275 TS Forces Special Posts: 10,704   +397

    One thing to consider (and I'm not sure where this fits on the list of limitations) would simply be the restrictions based on the hardware/firmware..? Like for Windows, you are maxed at 4 gigs of RAM unless running 64bit, but also there is hardware (motherboards) out there that simply can't read more than x amount of RAM.
     

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