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Tech job market remains wide open to programming newcomers

By Dieter Holger
Jul 30, 2015
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  1. [parsehtml]<p><img src="http://www.techspot.com/images2/news/bigimage/2015/07/2015-07-29-image-20.jpg" /></p> <p>To improve their career prospects, college graduates from all kinds of backgrounds are completing courses in specialized programming schools. Results have been positive, with course graduates getting swiftly placed into jobs that pay <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/29/technology/code-academy-as-career-game-changer.html">above $100,000</a> despite the often late career change.</p> <p>The <a href="http://www.techspot.com/news/61369-tech-industry-dominates-most-valued-brands-billions.html">booming tech sector</a> needs plenty of programmers, which is why the Obama Administration&#39;s <a href="http://www.techspot.com/news/60008-obama-techhire-initiative-if-you-can-do-job.html">TechHire initiative</a> is pointing students to schools like Flatiron School, Hack Reactor, and Galvanize. This year, 16,000 students will graduate from programming trade schools, up almost 10,000 from last year, according to Course Report. Regardless of the surge, students complete a three to six-month program and consistently get a job immediately after graduation.</p> <p><a href="http://www.galvanize.com/">Galvanize</a>, for example, offers 11 to 24-week courses in full-stack engineering and data science. Most of its students are college grads in their 20s or 30s who are looking to improve their finances and career opportunities. A course can cost up to $24,000, but that&#39;s worth Galvanize&#39;s 98 percent job placement rate which often sends graduates into companies like IBM and American Express.</p> <p>Financial help is also available; Galvanize offers zero-interest loans, payment plans, and need-based scholarships. But they&#39;re also pickier than some 4-year universities, with a 20 percent acceptance rate and a preference for college graduates.</p> <p>Interestingly, women are more prevalent in programming trade schools than four-year computer science programs. In college, only 18 percent of computer science graduates are women, but among specialized programming schools the number increases to 35 percent.</p><p><a rel='alternate' href='http://www.techspot.com/news/61566-tech-job-market-remains-wide-open-programming-newcomers.html' target='_blank'>Permalink to story.</a></p><p class='permalink'><a rel='alternate' href='http://www.techspot.com/news/61566-tech-job-market-remains-wide-open-programming-newcomers.html'>http://www.techspot.com/news/61566-tech-job-market-remains-wide-open-programming-newcomers.html</a></p>[/parsehtml]
     
  2. RzmmDX

    RzmmDX TS Guru Posts: 305   +62

    I clearly did something wrong.

    And how is being placed in American Express a good thing? Surely there are better examples?
     
    Arris likes this.
  3. stewi0001

    stewi0001 TS Evangelist Posts: 1,185   +528

    Then why did I have such a hard time trying to find a job?
     
    Arris likes this.
  4. Skidmarksdeluxe

    Skidmarksdeluxe TS Evangelist Posts: 6,509   +2,056

    Too late for me, I'm already retired. I was never interested in programming/coding/developing anyway, I was more the techie type who liked to dive into the guts of everything.
     
    madboyv1 likes this.
  5. davislane1

    davislane1 TS Evangelist Posts: 3,560   +2,365

    "But they're also pickier than some 4-year universities, with a 20 percent acceptance rate and a preference for college graduates."

    As they should be. I've been amazed at some of the students unis are willing to let waltz through the door.

    "Interestingly, women are more prevalent in programming trade schools than four-year computer science programs. In college, only 18 percent of computer science graduates are women, but among specialized programming schools the number increases to 35 percent."

    Not interesting at all. Trade schools don't offer a diverse degree selection abundant with easier alternatives. Ergo, not only will there be fewer female applicants in total, those applicants will be enrolled exclusively in programming courses.
     
  6. MilwaukeeMike

    MilwaukeeMike TS Evangelist Posts: 2,752   +1,107

    I believe it... I'm in the IT department of a large company and we've had problems finding good programmers. It's a job that takes some brains, and there's a high demand for it. My wife works at a job sourcing company and the time to find a job for new programmers is actually negative. Meaning they have jobs available for people before they have the people to find a job for.

    Go learn some coding skills, kids! Through in some database classes and you'll be well on your way! :)
     
  7. Arris

    Arris TS Evangelist Posts: 4,608   +295

    Outsourcing to India and China basically makes any programming career a dead end for anyone in western world. My employer now has 40 plus developers employed between Indonesia, India and China.
     

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