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User profile service fails

By abbasi
Nov 12, 2013
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  1. Hi guys,

    I have Windows 7 and 3 drives on my HDD. The second drive is D:\, and there are some files in that. I decided to install 8.1 Enterprise so I installed it in dual boot manner beside 7 and in D:\ drive which as I said was not empty and when installing 8.1, I didn't format the D:\. I installed 8.1 successfully in D:\ and it was working fine.
    One time which I came up with 7, I thought I should arrange the 8.1 folders in D: to be separated from the other non-8.1 folders, so I created a new folder named it "Windows 8.1" and cut all 8.1 folders and pasted them into that new folder. Now my D: drive was arranged. When I restart the PC, I selected the 8.1 to start with, but it didn't come up like before and instead, it shows now a blue screen (not the blue screen of death!) and the time is shown in left-down corner of it. When I click the screen this message appears:
    The User Profile Service service Failed the sign-in.
    User Profile can not be loaded.

    I know two things:
    1- The problem is to do with that cutting and pasting the 8.1 folders to be arranged. And
    2- If I reinstall the 8.1, the problem will be solved (but if I don't do that cutting and pasting again!)

    Is there any simpler way to solve the issue and have the two OSs with each other?
     
  2. gbhall

    gbhall TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,423   +77

    I doubt it. Moving the Win 8.1 files you want to boot into has probably disconnected them from the dual-boot process which is stored in a different place - often even on a different drive, and maybe not even a drive you can actually see. For instance, Win 7 usually has a small, hidden system drive which has no drive letter, and the startup files are in there in a database called BCD. When you installed Win 8.1 you probably modified that database.

    Short of reinstalling Win 8.1, you could try this http://pcsupport.about.com/od/fixtheproblem/ht/rebuild-bcd-store-windows.htm although it could be slightly different for Win 8.1, or even a lot different if your PC has a protected Bios, UEFI booting etc described here http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/dn168167.aspx

    Essentially, you must realise that Windows since WinXP has got so complicated with so many different inter-connected bits and pieces (much of which you can't actually see for security reasons), that blithely moving things around - as you might have got away with a few years ago - is now absolutely certain to screw things up good and proper.
     

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