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Warning! Dell PC owners read this before replacing your powersupply

By dmill89
Aug 2, 2006
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  1. Many older Dell PCs contain a propriatary powersupply.The connectors on these powersupplies look like and fit standard ATX connectors but they are wired differently so the voltage produced by each pin is different than a standard ATX powersupply. Replaceing these propriatary powersupplies with a stantard ATX powersupply may result in the PC simply not starting if the powersupply has good protection.The other posibility is that the powersupply will try to power the system and fry components such as the CPU,motherboard,or ram.This mainly applies to Dell Pentium 2 and Pentium 3 systems but some early Pentium 4 Dells are also affected.Dell Systems with a 24 pin connector are not affected
    This lists a PC Power & Cooling replacement powersupply for specific dell systems.
    http://www.pcpowercooling.com/products/power_supplies/selector/dell.htm

    you can also use a Dell converter to turn any ATX power supply into a Dell compatible unit they are avalible here
    http://www.endpcnoise.com/cgi-bin/e/std/sku=dellconverter

    Here is a list of some non-effected systems:
    http://www.pchardwarehelp.com/Power-Supply.php
    many newer models with 24 pin connectors are not on this list but all 24 pin models are not affected
  2. Tedster

    Tedster Techspot old timer..... Posts: 10,074   +13

    In addition to PSUs, many DELLs use proprietary parts such as RAM. Regular memory sticks will often not work.
  3. vnf4ultra

    vnf4ultra TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,195

    The list actually just shows which pcp&c power supply they'd like you to put in your system. Many on the list can use standard atx psus. IMO, it's their way of tricking users into thinking that they need a $130 PSU to do the same job a $50 unit will do.

    More info.
    http://www.pchardwarehelp.com/Power-Supply.php
  4. dmill89

    dmill89 TS Guru Topic Starter Posts: 737

    I noticed that.that's why I added the note about the 24 pin models not being affected, but I wasn't completely sure which 20 pin models were and were not affected thanks for clearing that up.
  5. N3051M

    N3051M TS Rookie Posts: 2,800

    Christian, Welcome to Techspot :wave:

    Please read the rules about not posting your problems in this section of the forum.

    Instead, create a new thread in the relevant sections. I'd believe your problems should be located at the Hardware Tweaking section, where most people can help you there.

    Techspot Forum Homepage
  6. Seph

    Seph TS Rookie

    yeah i had a problem with a clients comp this guiys brought in his comp and said he had bought a new ps of the net and installed it in to his dell resulting in the cpu actually blowing a hole through the table i mean i have seen cpu 's exploded before when they have no heatsink/fan but this looked like a bomb had gone of in his comp lmao rofllol

    i think dell kind of sucks its trying to increase its revenue but hey u have to make a living
  7. Rik

    Rik Banned Posts: 4,985

    This is the standard for atx wiring - [​IMG]


    And this is what Dell use - [​IMG]
  8. Badaz

    Badaz TS Rookie

    Really? Any examples?

    What is a "Regular" RAM these days anyway? PC4200? 533MHz? 172 Pin?
  9. Boogityboo04

    Boogityboo04 TS Rookie Posts: 351

    I've upgraded several older and newer Dells with new RAM and PSU's and have never had any problem with incompatible RAM. The PSU thing is true but hardly anyone use those old Dells anymore anyway. People tend to bash Dell for "low quality" parts, but I haven't actually ever had a Dell part fail on me, especially one of the proprietary PSUs.
  10. bushwhacker

    bushwhacker TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 1,086

    Try RDRAM PC-800. ;)
  11. cosmos100

    cosmos100 TS Rookie Posts: 82

    I recently upgraded my RAM and I found Kingston did the job.

    But yes I've heard Dells can be picky with it
     


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