TechSpot

When setting up raid 1 do can you use sata drives?

By ingeborgdot
Nov 30, 2006
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. When setting up raid 1 do can you use sata drives?
     
  2. kitty500cat

    kitty500cat TS Rookie Posts: 2,407   +6

    What motherboard do you have? I think if you could find the manufacturer's product page for your mobo, it would probably say whether the SATA ports support RAID, and if so, what level(s) they support.
    If you're only shopping for a mobo and want to know if that will support it, at least if you're shopping on newegg.com, it will say whether it is supported.
    --kitty
     
  3. Rick

    Rick TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,304   +52 Staff Member

    SATA, IDE and SCSI can all do RAID. But as mentioned above, your host controller needs to support it.

    The host controller is the device which the drives plug into... it could be integrated into your motherboard, a seperate PCI card or even a USB RAID box.
     
  4. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot TechSpot Paladin Topic Starter Posts: 756

    Is the raid 1 actually good for home use. It will have farm data that is important. Would it be just as good to have two hard drives and do regular backups to it and once in awhile to backup to dvd.
     
  5. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot TechSpot Paladin Topic Starter Posts: 756

    After doing a lot more reading on the subject I have come to the conclusion that raid 1 is not all that safe and there are still issues that can cause you to lose your info. The safest to me is to have two hard drives and a seperate backup partition and also back up to dvd. What is the best backup software out there?
     
  6. Tedster

    Tedster Techspot old timer..... Posts: 10,074   +13

    I use Norton GOBACK, along with Windows Back-up and on occasion, Norton Ghost.
     
  7. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot TechSpot Paladin Topic Starter Posts: 756

    I have decided now to raid. I am going for it as a new adventure. I do want to ask this question though. I went through the step of starting the raid in bios and then went through the setup where it finally said healthy raid. I am doing a mirror raid. Anyway I have done the stuff needed like os cd and pushing f6 to install raid drivers like needed. It is now installing the os. My question is do I need to initialize the discs after this is all done. This is a brand new machine with a brand new install.
     
  8. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot TechSpot Paladin Topic Starter Posts: 756

    If I ever decide to take off the raid array can it be done? Can I just shut off raid and use one of the hard drives as another hard drive? Also, if I decide to keep the raid can I partition it after the fact because I have done a raid without a partition?
     
  9. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot TechSpot Paladin Topic Starter Posts: 756

    If I raid 1 and want a partition, will the 2nd partition without the os still be mirrored? Will all of the hard drive be mirrored?
     
  10. ingeborgdot

    ingeborgdot TechSpot Paladin Topic Starter Posts: 756

    On another computer it will be doing some video editing, what array is best for that? Don't tell me 0 please, as I will never use that because of how volitale it is.
     
  11. Rick

    Rick TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,304   +52 Staff Member

    My question is do I need to initialize the discs after this is all done. This is a brand new machine with a brand new install.
    'Initializing disks' often refers to erasing them. If you had to initialize them at any point, you would have had to do it BEFORE you install Windows on them. So don't worry about this.
    Yes. And since you are using RAID 1 (mirror), you can remove either drive and use it by itself without losing any of your data.

    RAID is done at the hardware level. Your software (including all disk partitioning/formatting utilities) will see the drives as one, single drive in RAID. You will not have to alter your RAID in anyway to partition it again. From here on out, it will be treated as a single disk.

    Yes. Your drive will be completely mirrored, sector by sector, beginning to end.

    Yes, it is 0. With redudancy, RAID 5 is a good choice, but requires 3 or more drives that are the same size. True RAID 5 controllers are also very expensive. RAID 1+0 might be a good choice for you if you have the cash for two more drives of the same size. It takes the best of RAID 0 and treats your two pairs of drives as RAID 0 arrays. It then takes both of those RAID 0 arrays and contains them as a single, RAID 1 array. You get speed and you get an exact mirror. However, you use 4 drives and only get the space of 2.
     
     
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...


Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.