TechSpot

Where to Start

By Psychotic
May 10, 2002
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  1. I am wanting to start programing, especially in java, but to be honest i dont have a clue where to start, there are so many books out there and different courses you can do.

    Can anyone suggest a good book for beginners but contain enough information to teach me enough to write in java, and teach me sorta everything i need to know, so i dont have to go out and spend thousands of rands in books, and if you know any good websites that may help

    :confused:
  2. Arris

    Arris TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 4,538   +92

    What previous experience do you have with programming?
    Is Java an additional language for you or your first?
  3. Psychotic

    Psychotic Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    i have no previouse experience with programing, but wanting to do web developement and would like to learn jave as a first
  4. Arris

    Arris TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 4,538   +92

    I would probably recommend a "Java for Dummies" book from the Dummies range. Simply because it will probably undertake the task of explaining the essence of Object Oriented Programming (OO), probably without much reference to procedural programming (which you are unexperienced with). Other than that the "Unleased" series of books from SAMS publishing have always been quite detailed and helpful (but then again I have a background in programming to build on with these books).

    Teach yourself Java 2 in 21 days
    SAMS publishing Java books
    Java 2 for Dummies
  5. Psychotic

    Psychotic Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    thank you for your help Arris, i really appreciate it :)
  6. Arris

    Arris TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 4,538   +92

    Your welcome.
    Hopefully some others will add other resources to this ;)
  7. Rick

    Rick TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,304   +52 Staff Member

    For web development, the importance of Java varies. What exactly do you plan on doing with web development? How much do you already know? Generally speaking, Java seems to be a way to "show off".. It can offer great functionality, but it is often not very practical to use.

    If you have very little web experience... It may be more useful to learn the ropes of DHTML (CSS, Javascript) before you dive into the complicated mess that is Java. Perhaps even Macromedia Flash.

    If you are into professional web development, knowing the ropes of XML, ASP, PHP or CGI is nearly essential.
  8. Vehementi

    Vehementi TechSpot Paladin Posts: 3,199

    An entry level programming language to consider right now is VB. It's pretty basic ( I mean, that's what the B is...) and is good for beginners. I would learn it, but I don't think I would find any use for it.
  9. androb

    androb Newcomer, in training Posts: 37

    So you want to learn JAVA :), that's a nice language to start.. first of all, I don't recommend the book "java for dummies", reason?? yes.. I have a couple of friends saying that It's no good...

    So you see.. I recommend you a book called JAVA 2 the author's are Deitel&Deitel, you should read that book, that book starts from beginners (with no experience).

    If this is your first language to learn.. I suggest you... to learn Visual Basic.. after that you should learn more languages :).
  10. androb

    androb Newcomer, in training Posts: 37

    Java is very interesting I tell you. You use it everywhere, example:

    With JAVA you can create some applets in websites.

    *Applets are little programs in java.

    you can program too in al language for web development called JSP "Java Server Pages" Wich is a language that contains JAVA, you can also create some scripts (javascript)

    I recommend you to, first learn some HTML, after that.. CSS after that.. javascript and After that.. you can start to learn some webprogramming (asp,php,jsp,cfm,cgi).
  11. Raine

    Raine Newcomer, in training

    I think for your very first dive into programming that you should begin with Visual Basic. It teaches you the fundamentals of programming, IPO, and is easy to learn. Once you've mastered VB then you can move into more advanced and useful languages.

    I'm currently in high school and I have been studying VB for two years! In my second year however, its been more engineering orientated. We're using VB to interact with the outside world via the parallel port to activate switches, infrared devices, motors etc. VB is a good place to start! Good luck.
     
  12. StormBringer

    StormBringer Newcomer, in training Posts: 2,871

    Well while everyone is putting their $0.02 in I might as well, If you want to really learn to program, get "old school" and start from the beginning with things like Assembly and Basic, thats what we learned with when I was in High School.

    But seriously, if you want to learn Java, or any programming language, the Dummies books are a good place to start, they are also a good reference book to have even if you should decide to use other means of learning.
  13. Didou

    Didou Bowtie extraordinair! Posts: 5,899

    Actually, I've heard a lot of teachers complain about this technique. Most of them say it's better to go straight into OO programming rather then a Procedural to OO upgarde. You have many reflexes with procedural programming that you tend to reproduce in OO programming ( which is really loosing a good part of the benefits OO programming brings ).
  14. Rick

    Rick TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,304   +52 Staff Member

    I fully agree. I had a hard time moving to Visual Basic after programming with BASIC since I was 5. It's one of the reasons I picked up C++ console like cakework.. But Visual Basic eluded me for the longest time.
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