which memory should i get

By onesmartidiot
Oct 3, 2006
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. i have an msi k8t-neo fis2r (amd64 3000+)

    im looking to buy new memory for this and put the old memory in my other machine. the manual says that i can have a max system memory of 2gb, i know this is stupid but im gonna ask it anyway... does this mean that its 2gb ber slot (theres 3) or 2 gb between all 3?

    my second question is about heatsinks

    newegg wants 15 more bucks for memory with heat spreaders on them, are they worth it?

    third question - timing

    what the crap do i need to know here?

    the 2 sets im looking at are

    2x 1gb dual channel g.skill pc 3200 or
    2x 1gb dual channel patriot signature pc 3200

    :)

    and i know someone will ask

    this is an all in one system- i play games, do wussy internet stuff, and flash/photoshop cs2.

    so i'd prefer somthing thats stronger for flash and stuff rather than high performance for gaming
  2. nickslick74

    nickslick74 Newcomer, in training Posts: 883

    If you aren't hardcore gaming, then don't worry about the heat spreaders. Either memory should be fine as long as its compatible with your mobo. When in doubt, there's always corsair value ram.

    If you ARE going to hardcore game, then look in to corsair xms or good ocz memory, it will have lower latencies then the cheaper stuff. But if just general gaming value type ram will be fine for flash.
  3. Tedster

    Tedster Techspot old timer..... Posts: 10,074   +13

  4. Grandenhag

    Grandenhag Newcomer, in training

    go for it

    yeah, i would go for the ram with heat spreaders. if your going to do any gaming at all its worth it to have the faster ram (worth it in the sense that you will feel better about it then worth it in the sense that you will see a performance increase)
    What kind of video card do you have??
  5. onesmartidiot

    onesmartidiot Newcomer, in training Topic Starter Posts: 168

    ati radeon 9800 256mb pushing 2 17 inch crts at 1280x1024 a piece

    is corsair the "lexus" of computer memory these days?
  6. Mirob

    Mirob TechSpot Paladin Posts: 841

    Corsair is good. So are the others.

    Heatspreaders are just for looks, it's the chips used underneath them that matters.
  7. onesmartidiot

    onesmartidiot Newcomer, in training Topic Starter Posts: 168

    so regardless of the brand on the package, its the chip manufacture??

    on my memory chips, they say simpletech, and the other one says adata (they are both simpletech pc3200)

    and let me ask this, if the sticket says ddr333, is it still considered pc3200?

    i got to looking and what were bought as 2 packges of 512 mb pc3200 ddr400, one of them says 333. i always wondered why it didnt have a dual channel speed boost
  8. Grafficks

    Grafficks Newcomer, in training Posts: 454

    I'm pretty sure you're talking about your current RAM that you have on your PC, not newly purchased right? And that one of them is Simpletech and the other is A-Data?


    DDR-333 means it is 333MHz. That is the speed.

    DDR-333 has PC-2700, which means it's capable of a theoretical 2700 MB/s (2.7 GB/s) data transfer.

    So to answer your question, no, DDR-333 is not PC3200.

    DDR-400 is PC3200.

    If the two sticks of RAM work together, it means that they are running at the lower speed of the two (in this case, 333MHz, so the one that is DDR400 has 67MHz wasted/un-used).


    The heatsinks are just for looks, and they don't actually help that much in diffusing the heat created by the RAM. I for one would definately prefer to look at a nice RAM heatspreader than a bare green+black chip.

    Doesn't look like anyone's answered this yet.
    Memory Latency (timings) is defined as the length of time between sending a request and receiving the response. Low-latency RAM responds faster.

    Latency can be determined by a string of numbers on the RAM's specs. For example, RAM spec'd at 4-4-4-12 timings will take less time to respond (will respond faster) than RAM spec'd at 5-5-5-15. Make sense?



    If ever you want to get RAM for a dual channel config, get them in Dual channel kits. It's much easier and you're almost guaranteed they will work together, since they were tested together before packaged.

    Good luck :)
  9. Tedster

    Tedster Techspot old timer..... Posts: 10,074   +13

    did you even READ my link? All your questions are answered there.
  10. Mirob

    Mirob TechSpot Paladin Posts: 841

    Just because memory is rated at 333mhz does not mean it won't run 400mhz, it's just not guaranteed to, and the SPD is not programed with timings for that speed. Some DDR-400 with Samsung TCCD chips can be overclocked past DDR-600! But it's not just the chips but also the design of the PC board they are soldered to that can limit it's speed. All memory can run slower than it's rated specs. Some only work with certain timmings while others can go faster with looser timmings. Still other types go faster with more voltage.
  11. Tedster

    Tedster Techspot old timer..... Posts: 10,074   +13

    overclocking memory is very risky and a sure fire way to burn it out. I NEVER recommend overclocking RAM. And only under special circumstances would I condone overclocking a CPU.
     
Topic Status:
Not open for further replies.


Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...


Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.