Windows Server 2003 or Mac OSX Server?

By regulluz
Feb 15, 2007
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  1. Hello!

    I have come to this situation where I am in a crossroads and have no clue on what to do.

    This small property rent business is looking to secure their network. They have been using the same network (P2P) configuration for more than 10 years, and now they have some hackers getting into their stuff. The rather don't assign passwords to every computer, since users would forget them, or change them; and because every PC is its own world, the would have to go one by one. There are only about 14 computers, but they're far apart from each other.

    Now, the big problem starts now: As much as I love Macs, I am a Windows User. My whole training has been in Windows, and I am trained to work with Windows Domains. BUT, these people have MACs all over!! They have some new employees who would bring their PCs from home, rather than work on Macs (so at least that's a good start).

    So, should I go and setup a Windows domain with all those Macs, or try too learn and install a Mac Domain (or whatever its equivalent)? Cost would be an issue playing a strong card here.

    Mac Users, please... what do you recommend?
  2. Mictlantecuhtli

    Mictlantecuhtli TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 4,916   +9

    Hi.
    What exactly is a p2p configuration in this case? No central server whatsoever?

    You can learn new things, can't you? At least learning would help in computer business.

    That kind of attitude wouldn't go far where I work.

    It depends on what you want to do with the network. Where exactly would you need Active Directory? Would you want remote administration of OS X & Windows desktops? Web server? Media server? Print server? Backup server?
  3. Boogityboo04

    Boogityboo04 Newcomer, in training Posts: 351

    From what I remember Mac OSX Server is not to hard to learn to use. I would recommend it for you.

    Frankly, those people would be fired where I work. We also happen to use a huge array of XServes and Xserve RAIDS. ;)

    Anyway, you said that some people already use Macs there, I would just go ahead and set up a Mac.
  4. Rick

    Rick TechSpot Staff Posts: 6,304   +52 Staff Member

    I'm quite pleased with the X-serve & OS X server products. I think if the majority of your clients are Mac, you should definitely stick with an Apple server.

    OS X server does some really cool things that you'll appreciate as a system administrator, such as Netboot and Netinstall... It's REAL easy to set up too. Remote desktop is great and well, Apples should really be with Apples here.

    OS X server can also communicate very well with Windows machines... So I think this is a pretty closed book. OS X Server is best for this situation.
  5. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,352   +301

    there's a very old adage that goes, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do!" :giddy:

    to do otherwise is trying to fit a square peg into a round hole :(
  6. NRJ

    NRJ Newcomer, in training Posts: 33

    Is there an MS exchange server equivalent for Macs, and where a PC can connect to it? Might help with your little hackers. I would definalty go with a central server with a DC or equivalent. I dont know how old those Mac are. I only tryed a G5 with OSX 10.2 on it for a couple months back in 2004, i think. Was the first time i used it and it wasnt in a network setting, so I wouldnt know how to connect it to a server.
  7. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,352   +301

    Primary features of MS Exchange are:
    Check emails anytime/anywhere
    Retrieve and respond to emails remotely using a computer and internet connection. This is done via Outlook Web Access (OWA) feature.

    Collaboration:
    1. Microsoft exchange email hosting comes with features such as
    2. Shared Calendars,
    3. Shared contacts,
    4. Public folders,
    5. Meetings scheduling,
    6. Tasks management.

    On OS X, the Collaboration Suite is called 'Entourage'
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