New Microsoft Developer Tools On The Way

By Derek Sooman on June 29, 2004, 3:26 PM
Microsoft will be nodding to nonprofessional programmers with a new line of developer tools, including a free version of SQL Server.

[COLOR=#1951B9]The company launched the new line of "Express" brand developer tools at its TechEd Europe conference in Amsterdam on Tuesday. The lightweight editions of its Visual Studio line and SQL Server database are meant to expanding Microsoft's presence among students and hobbyists.[/COLOR]

Microsoft executives also confirmed that beta versions of SQL Server 2005 and Visual Studio 2005 are "imminent." Completed products are expected in the first half of next year.

More here.




User Comments: 6

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EvilKernel said:
Yep, this is just what the world needs. As if windows wasn't insecure enough, lets encourage hobbyists to populate the web with their buggy "hobbyists" programs, by making it easier for them to program on VB (as if that's even possible) without really understanding what they're doing.No more "Hello World..", but "Hello World, here are some more Buffer Overflows for you to play with" ...
Nic said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by EvilKernel [/i]Yep, this is just what the world needs. As if windows wasn't insecure enough, lets encourage hobbyists to populate the web with their buggy "hobbyists" programs, by making it easier for them to program on VB (as if that's even possible) without really understanding what they're doing.No more "Hello World..", but "Hello World, here are some more Buffer Overflows for you to play with" ... [/quote] You obviously know nothing about .NET then. Security plays a big part in the .NET initiative, and issues such as buffer overflows will soon be a thing of the past. Longhorn will also be the most secure OS available, when it is eventually released. Maybe you should read up on things before making such comments.
Masque said:
....not to mention that fresh ideas can come from new minds. Somebody may get the base idea/program out there that somebody else could pick up on and improve.....open-source style. But also, like our current open-source initiatives, a person needs to be aware of what they're using.
EvilKernel said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Nic [/i]You obviously know nothing about .NET then. Security plays a big part in the .NET initiative, and issues such as buffer overflows will soon be a thing of the past. Longhorn will also be the most secure OS available, when it is eventually released. Maybe you should read up on things before making such comments. [/quote] Judging by how you're just repeating microsoft claims, it is safe to say you know nothing about security. "Security plays a big part in the .NET initiative", "Longhorn will be the most secure OS available". Sounds like something right out of the splash screens you get while isntalling microsoft products. I am not sure how long you've been in the industry (judging by your response, not very long it seems) but you should know better than to trust claims from microsoft; especially when the claims relate to security.Maybe the next time you decide to bash somebody's post or opinion, you will do so with substance instead of just copying and pasting excerpts from the MS site.
Nic said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by EvilKernel [/i]Maybe the next time you decide to bash somebody's post or opinion, you will do so with substance instead of just copying and pasting excerpts from the MS site. [/quote] Well, sorry to disapoint you, but I am a software developer by trade, and I am using .NET tools currently. It would appear to me that you know nothing about what you say, and instead have opted into the assumption that things never improve if they are done by Microsoft.Do you actually know what you are talking about, or are you simply regurgitating the same old opinions that you have held for years? Maybe you could enlighten us with your technical breakdown of why security has/will not improve with the latest tools and the new OS.Besides, I felt I was very polite in the way I pointed out your misrepresentation of the facts, and I certainly didn't intend to make you look like a fool. You did that yourself. Just because you have opted to join in the latest craze of Microsoft bashing doesn't mean you should be lazy and provide your ill concieved criticism as fact. Please do your homework before posting. :)
Phantasm66 said:
I think its great when things that are free or kind of free and released for developers to play with. That's how we learn and that's how things get done in the end.
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