Rented music may seriously threaten iPod

By Derek Sooman on February 8, 2005, 11:12 AM
New copy-protection software from Microsoft may help to move consumers away from buying songs by the track, and instead into renting them. The new software works by putting a timer on the tracks loaded on the player. Every time the user connects the player to the PC and the music service, the player automatically checks whether the user's subscription is still in effect. Songs stop playing if the subscription has lapsed. Many experts believe that if lots of music players that support this technology spring up, it could cause serious problems for iPod.

"This is potentially the first serious challenge that the iPod is going to face. What these devices are going to be able to do is attack iPod where it's weak." - Phil Leigh, president of Tampa, Florida-based Inside Digital Media.

Clever use of marketing will be paramount in winning customers over to paying a monthly fee for music, like they might do for cable television programming, rather than buying music in the way they are used to. But the business model is becoming a realistic one, and it could soon take off with the proper backing.




User Comments: 7

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sircharles said:
I can not see how this would be any threath to ipod or any ipod type players. Unlike movies, I do not intend to rent my music for period of x days or weeks. The same can be said for others. I collect music and type of music I listen depends on my mood. ipod and many other portable player will lives long as artists are making good music.This is another pathetic attempt to challenge ipod or any othe rplayer.
Phantasm66 said:
Neither do I. And iPod will just innovate to encorporate any superior market model that's around.
godataloss said:
Who the hell would buy a device that only plays 'rented' music? Unless the unit was free or heavily subsidised, who would want one?
Phantasm66 said:
[quote]Clever use of marketing will be paramount in winning customers over to paying a monthly fee for music, like they might do for cable television programming, rather than buying music in the way they are used to. But the business model is becoming a realistic one, and it could soon take off with the proper backing.[/quote]It will take off only because it will be imposed on us. Sometimes its like no one is on the side of the consumer anymore. They always seem to be on the side of big business.(even although I am arguing with my own article!)
Phantasm66 said:
[b]Originally posted by godataloss:[/b][quote]Who the hell would buy a device that only plays 'rented' music? Unless the unit was free or heavily subsidised, who would want one? [/quote]Or.. erm... maybe that the songs were cheaper to rent, perhaps?
Mikael said:
Napster wants to launch a service where you pay something like $14.99 a month to put as many songs as you want onto your MP3 player. I kind of like the idea, and hope that they succeed with it. It's going to really end up as a media battle, instead of a product battle. Apple and iTunes/iPods are everywhere, and Napster isn't.
Phantasm66 said:
iPod is kind of the walkman of the 21st century, maybe??
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