More on MPAA war on P2P and LokiTorrent takedown

By Derek Sooman on February 14, 2005, 11:09 AM
Now that the dust has settled on the Lokitorrent shutdown, we've been able to gather a few bits and pieces of news on this story, and on the general internet P2P movie swapping crackdown.

Apparently, LokiTorrent site operator Edward Webber has agreed to pay a substantial settlement with even greater financial penalties for any further such actions. He has also agreed to make available all server data relating to illegal BitTorrent activities, which will mean logs and other server data such as database tables, if this is available. The MPAA are no doubt plotting to use this to clamp down on P2P users who are trading movies illegally on the net, and pursue legal action against them as well.

A Dallas court agreed that Hollywood lawyers would be allowed access to LokiTorrent's server records which could let them single out those who were sharing files illegally.

Things were up until fairly recently looking good for LokiTorrent, who had decided to keep fighting and not give up after the first round of legal warnings from the MPAA made many other such sites curl up and die. They had even managed to raise $40,000 from their users in order to fund their legal battle against the MPAA. Now, it looks like all of that is over.

The action came after the operators of LokiTorrent agreed a settlement with the MPAA. A stark message has appeared on the site from the MPAA warning "You can click, but you can't hide".




User Comments: 8

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Spike said:
Personally, I think that the whole point of what the MPAA (And the RIAA) is doing (Trying to stop the people loosing them billions each year), is complete and utter rubbish.I have been known to download the odd film or two in the past. Most people have. There's something about the fact that you can to it that tempts you to do it, at fist at least. The trouble is though, I've never been big on buying DVD's, and I never will be. How they could have ever lost money from me I don't know. I would never have bought them in the first place, whether I could download them or not.Another thing I find slightly suspicious is that it doesn't matter whether a film costs $100million or $10million to make, the DVD still costs us about 15 here in the UK. Is it just me, or does this really look like price-fixing?I can't help but to feel that at least some aspect of the actions of the MPAA contain some element of desire to make an immediate profit out of these court cases. I have a feeling that it didn't cost them $1million to bring this to a Dallas court.
IDontTrustThem said:
The reason i think the MPAA and RIAA are doing this is because they are jealous. They are jealous because we are getting what we want for free, while they are not getting anything. They are also doing this because they want to take money out of our pockets, and they have nothing else to do then to watch what people do on the internet, how sad. I do buy dvds more then i used to. I used to download films and disable my sharing, but now i dont do it anymore because of this news kicking in fast about illegal sharing and downloads. There is nothing wrong with downloading or sharing files, the reason why there isnt anything wrong is because its there available for people to download and share files. If its a bad thing then why the hell is it available to everyone? and why are more and more new p2p programmes coming out today?.First of all they should get the people who are responible for making these p2p programes like kazaa and imesh. they shouldnt get the people who download/share. If they find it so wrong and bad to download and share why the hell arnt they shutting down these programmes? if they are so powerful like they claim to be then they can shut them down. The reason why i think they havnt shut these programmes down and just tracking people is so they can have there fun in downloading and hacking into peoples computers for fun. In my opinion and i know im allowed to have one, i think MPAA, RIAA are greedy people with no respect for anyone. I think they are evil people and dont care about anyone and how they feel they only care about Money $$$$$$$$$. The other thing i hate about MPAA and RIAA is that they invade in peoples privacy, theres nothing we can do without them knowing it, and i think its not fair, i think they should be stopped. They are just as bad as everyone else.
Spike said:
I'm not quite sure I'd go that far, but yes, I do agree that they are evil power and money hungry corrupt organisations.
Phantasm66 said:
Downloading movies is just like using a VCR.But if the VCR were invented today, that would be illegal too.So would tobacco.And alcohol.And lots of other things as well.
Phantasm66 said:
[quote]He has also agreed to make available all server data relating to illegal BitTorrent activities, which will mean logs and other server data such as database tables, if this is available. [/quote]This is potentially very scarey. Who know how well that software was written, maybe every last download was properly logged along with IP address, or even written with sql into a table in a database! The next logical extention of all of this is to start going for the actual joe normal downloaders, not just the people running the sites.
Phantasm66 said:
[b]Originally posted by Phantasm66:[/b][quote][quote]He has also agreed to make available all server data relating to illegal BitTorrent activities, which will mean logs and other server data such as database tables, if this is available. [/quote]This is potentially very scarey. Who know how well that software was written, maybe every last download was properly logged along with IP address, or even written with sql into a table in a database! The next logical extension of all of this is to start going for the actual joe normal downloaders, not just the people running the sites.[/quote]
Mikael said:
"LokiTorrent had raised more than $40,000 from its fan base to help its legal battle against the MPAA. It's unclear if that money went straight to the MPAA. LokiTorrent has not responded to a request for comment." Hmm... Even though I hate to say it, it wouldn't be too shocking to hear that LokiTorrent accepted donations and sent the money straight to the MPAA. I am in the process of writing a series of articles that deals with the MPAA, RIAA and file sharing, so keep your eyes out for it! If you have any questions about file sharing that you would like answered, feel free to e-mail (mikael @ techspot.com) or PM me and I will see if I can get them answered for you.
photon_emission said:
Here's the deal, maybe some of you take the same view as I on the whole P2P thing:I am a movie collector, i.e. I have an extensive collection of DVDs. Before P2P clients began offering DVDs, I would buy movies I hadn't seen before, watch them, and if they were crap, I would take them to a place like Music Trader or The Wherehouse and sell them back. . . no big deal, right?Now, I will download a flick in a lower quality format, e.g. a 800MB copy of Chronicles of Riddick. I will watch it on my laptop when I am away on business or on the plane, etc. If I like the movie, I order the DVD from dvdplanet.com or wherever I can find it the cheapest. If it sucks, I delete the MF. Why would I want to keep a movie that sucks??? Sometimes, I don't even watch a whole film because it sucks so badly. If I were at the movie theater, I would ask for my money back in such a case. (Example: League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. . . wtf was THAT all about???)For movies, they should implement some kind of policy that mimicks the shareware policy for software. If I am interested in a program but want to try it before I buy it, I should have the right to do so. If the software sucks, I am not going to use it or keep it, etc.Trailers are NOT reliable because they often show only the best bits of movies while the rest of the movie is an utter PoS. It would be like the studios offering a money back garranty for their films. "We are sure you will like this or your money back."Another case for video is TV programming. I don't have the time to watch my favorite programs when they air. Like, CSI, Law and Order, etc. However, when those box sets come out, again, I order them from the cheapest place I can find. In the meantime, what difference does it make whether I tape the show on my VCR, Tivo it, get a Tivo-ed copy from my buddy, or DL it off of a Bittorrent resource??? Sure, with my own VCR and Tivo, I may be paying a miniscule percentage to the MPAA or networks when I buy the thing. But after that, I am not really paying anything, no royalties, etc. And, with today's computer technology, you can turn your PC into a Tivo with just an All-in-Wonder card. I'll bet there are NO royalties paid when you buy this hardware.Finally, a note about music. I like a lot of 80s bands who were on tiny little buttnugget labels that have been out of business for decades now. E.g. Bauhaus, Wide Boy Awake, The Polecats, etc. I have searched endlessly for the vinyl, CDs, etc. Some, I have found. Others, I have not. However, some kind souls have taken the time to rip these tracks into digital format and share them on the net. Who are we harming in doing this? The artists and labels who have been long defunct?? If anything, we are paying them hommage and keeping their name alive through usage.The other case with the movies applies here as well. If I have heard of a band but haven't heard their stuff, I will download a song or two, or in some cases, the whole album. I listen. If I like it, I will go buy it. If it sucks. . . "Mmmmbuh-bye!" Again, the clips that Amazon and such offer aren't nearly enough to get an accurate picture of the artist, album, etc.So, there it is. I think the RIAA and MPAA should adopt a more user-friendly strategy and ask themselves WHY people are turning to P2P solutions rather than striking out via a defensive, knee-jerk reaction, vis a vis, suing the little guys.
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