RIAA targets more University students

By Derek Sooman on April 15, 2005, 1:30 PM
Determined again to make criminals of our young people, the RIAA has decided to pick on some more college students, with a fresh round of lawsuits. This time, itís the turn of a grand total of 405 students at 18 colleges across the USA. 25 of the students are from Princeton University. The issue at hand here seems to be the alleged misuse of the Internet2 technology, which we recently reported on. The RIAA have vowed not to let Internet2 become "a zone of lawlessness where the normal rules don't apply."

Mr. Sherman said only the most "egregious" offenders are being targeted in this round of suits, and, when asked, wouldn't disclose the RIAA's methods for tracking the alleged illegal activity by targeted students. "We don't give out that information, because our investigative techniques wouldn't be as effective if everybody knew what they were," he said.

In addition to the 18 campuses where students are being sued, the RIAA said it has evidence of improper activities using i2hub at 140 other schools in 41 states. Letters are being sent to the presidents of these schools alerting them to the illegal activity occurring on their campuses, the RIAA said.

The RIAA said it has opted to limit the number of lawsuits to 25 per school at this time. Some users sued this week allegedly have shared as many as 13,600 MP3 files and as many as 72,700 total files ó files containing audio, software and video, according to the RIAA.




User Comments: 10

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d212tech said:
there are consequences to stealing,,,,
phantasm66 said:
Yes, there are.But if you stop to think about it - what's next? We go around arresting people who have copied VCR tapes over the years? Or copied a CD to a cassette for their friends? Man, think about what is happening here: young people are being criminalised, and having their futures taken away, because they are being singled out for something that EVERYONE is doing anyway. Why do you think iPods sell? Wake up. P2P is out of the bottle now like a genie, and it can't be put back in. Ruining the future of college students is no answer, surely everyone can see that?
dwgk said:
Say, you're an owner of a vineyard, and you see hundreds of thousands of people "swarming" to your vineyard, picking off your grapes. Would you say "Oh, it's okay, EVERYONE is doing it anyway" and not even care to arrest some of them?If you think that's okay, then please write me back with your current address. I'll pay you a visit and steal some of your stuff that I feel is trivial to you when you're not at home. That's okay too, right?[b]Originally posted by phantasm66:[/b][quote]Yes, there are.But if you stop to think about it - what's next? We go around arresting people who have copied VCR tapes over the years? Or copied a CD to a cassette for their friends? Man, think about what is happening here: young people are being criminalised, and having their futures taken away, because they are being singled out for something that EVERYONE is doing anyway. Why do you think iPods sell? Wake up. P2P is out of the bottle now like a genie, and it can't be put back in. Ruining the future of college students is no answer, surely everyone can see that?[/quote]
zephead said:
i guess the real lesson here is don't get caught ;)
phantasm66 said:
If everyone is doing something that is against the law, then that is a bad law. Its a law that is hard to enforce, and leads to injustice when some people are caught, because examples are made of them and punishment is far too harsh. Surely people must see that the campaign from the RIAA is unjust and wrong.
Mikael said:
If it is such a serious crime, I wonder why the RIAA prefers to make people settle out of court? Perhaps there is always the chance that they have made a mistake on who they targeted (which has happened a few times in the past).In all honesty, downloading a song and breaking into a house are completely different. Perhaps instead of clogging the courts with these lawsuits, the RIAA should try and find a way to better provide music to listeners?
phantasm66 said:
[b]Originally posted by Mikael:[/b][quote]In all honesty, downloading a song and breaking into a house are completely different. Perhaps instead of clogging the courts with these lawsuits, the RIAA should try and find a way to better provide music to listeners? [/quote]I completely agree.
phantasm66 said:
The existing system does not work. That is why people are resorting to illegal practices. If there was a new, better system, then there would be no crime. Punishing young people, and ruining their futures, is NO ANSWER.
Sil said:
[b]Originally posted by Mikael:[/b][quote]In all honesty, downloading a song and breaking into a house are completely different.[/quote]Breaking into a house'd be like hacking into a PC, or of that like.
Mictlantecuhtli said:
[b]Originally posted by Sil:[/b][quote][b]Originally posted by Mikael:[/b][quote]In all honesty, downloading a song and breaking into a house are completely different.[/quote]Breaking into a house'd be like hacking into a PC, or of that like.[/quote]Breaking into, maybe. Downloading, no.You can't copy furniture or household appliances. If you steal them, they're gone from the original owner, but it's possible to steal software without the owner even noticing anything.
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