1000W Power Supplies from Enermax

By Justin Mann on August 23, 2005, 12:50 PM
We're all aware of the increasing need for power in our computers. Just a few years ago, a 180W or 200W PSU may have been sufficient for a desktop level machine. Now, a 350W PSU is oft quoted as the “minimum” for any serious rig. Enermax, though, has gone off the deep end with a 1 kilowatt power supply. Supposedly this standard ATX beast is supposed to be able to deliver a combined load of an incredible 1000W. Under full load, it was drawing 1400W. To get an idea of just how much power that is for one little machine, the average window unit air conditioner uses about 800W, and most microwaves, when under full load, use around 1000-1400W. That's a lot of power potential!

Although there is no really foreseeable use for this device at the current moment, if trends continue, no matter how power efficient our computers become they will still continue to suck up power at increasing rates.




User Comments: 5

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Phantasm66 said:
I currently have a 600W PSU in my machine, and sometimes I do wonder if it is overkill. OK, I do have my 5 hard drives in there, RAID controller, powerful graphics card, kick ass CPU, extra fans, etc, but I do sometimes wonder if it’s just a bit too much juice. It’s certainly too much noise, anyway. That’s why, even although I am very impressed with the new Enermax 1000W PSU, I do have cause to stop and wonder just what the hell kind of machine needs that much power. (Well, a machine that folks on this site would build, anyway, I am not talking about some e-Commerce Web server here, I mean a home machine.) A box with 10 hard drives, perhaps? 2 system disks and 2 x 4 RAID 0? Two graphics cards? More than 2? Certainly, the idea of having 1000W to play with does open up the possibility of building a complete and utter monster. Question is… do you really want to? (If you read this site you probably do…!)
Per Hansson said:
That seems "a bit" uneccessary :DOn my Proliant 3000 server with 10 SCSI harddrives I can kind of see the reason for 2x 750w PSU'sBut come on, for a desktop machine?! Last time I checked my computer drew 150w from the mains, that means it's pulling like 110w or something from the PSU (it has around 80% efficiency)My PSU is a Nexus NX-3000 300w PSU, I've got 3x harddrives, 2x optical drives and a moderatley fast computer overall...Show me a computer that would need more than those 300 watts of power and I'll shut up a little, show me one that would need 1kw and I'll shut up for good ;-)
Soul Harvester said:
[b]Originally posted by Per Hansson:[/b][quote]That seems "a bit" uneccessary :DOn my Proliant 3000 server with 10 SCSI harddrives I can kind of see the reason for 2x 750w PSU'sBut come on, for a desktop machine?! Last time I checked my computer drew 150w from the mains, that means it's pulling like 110w or something from the PSU (it has around 80% efficiency)My PSU is a Nexus NX-3000 300w PSU, I've got 3x harddrives, 2x optical drives and a moderatley fast computer overall...Show me a computer that would need more than those 300 watts of power and I'll shut up a little, show me one that would need 1kw and I'll shut up for good ;-)[/quote]My NAS at home has 16 x IDE drives in it, on top of having 4 IDE raid controllers and an Athlon XP 3200+Then we have my dual core P4 830+ with 4 x SATA drives, a DVDRW and a CDRW, a 256mb PCI-Ex 6600 along with a TV tuner and 2 gigs of DDR2 ramMy athlon64 machine also has a X800 XT AIW along with 2 x SATA and 6 x IDE HDD, CDRW and DVDRWAll three of those machines need a PSU above 300W.
Per Hansson said:
Well, someone must have listened, my Nexus PSU has served me well for over 3 years, a few months ago I swapped out a few caps that had leaked electrolyte; this got rid of my cold start problems...But today the damn thing exploded! A resistor or whatever it was is totally blown away from the PCB, and the heatsink closest to it was over 100°C hot!!!Guess I'll be shopping for a new PSU today...
jet2003 said:
here is a good link for power supply calculation[url]http://www.jscustompcs.com/power_supply/[/ur
]
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