France lawmakers endorse file-sharing

By Derek Sooman on December 26, 2005, 8:01 PM
The French believe in online sharing of music and movies it seems. Lawmakers there have endorsed amendments to legalize the online sharing of music and movies, rather than making moves to punish such activities. Under originally proposed moves, those caught pirating copy-protected material would have faced $360,000 in fines and up to three years in jail. However, showbiz and cultural celebrities protested the move, and resulting amendments voted will legalize file-sharing by anyone paying a monthly royalties duty estimated at $8.50. Now this truly is the way forward!

Needless to say, music labels and movie distributors don’t like this one bit. They have made claims that these new laws will break international laws on intellectual property, as have some celebrities and other media figures.

"To legalize the downloading of our music, almost free of charge, is to kill our work," venerable rocker Johnny Hallyday said in a statement.

The actors’ and musicians’ branch of France’s largest trade union, the CFDT, said the plan "would mean the death of our country’s music and audiovisual industries."




User Comments: 10

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Rod_Massoudi said:
Do they resent the United States so much as to completely disregard their entertainment industry to avoid being related to the United States in one aspect or another? Either way, although I pass no judgement on piracy and legalities, I think it would be economic suicide if the French legalize piracy. If this were the case, intellectual property would completely be disbanded in France, and as a result, NO COUNTRY with any intellectual property will run any sort of business in France in fear of losing their edge. Patents and their derivatives will completely be no use - if these amendments come to pass, France is simply doomed. Forget WWII, this corporate Blitzkrieg out of France will undoubtedly shatter them.To add: France would absolutely be sanctioned from intellectual based products such as technology and other sophisticated products in fear that the french will mass produce replica's. Because of this move, France will have to live in autarky, and in this day and age, autarky for highly developed countries is suicide. [Edited by Rod_Massoudi on 2005-12-26 21:21:20]
cyrax said:
Actually filesharing is used other than games and movies....Assignment can be hosted and transmitted. Its clearly a ruling based on the understanding that people will use it for legal purposes.
zephead said:
i can't wait to see what further lawsuits this causes ...*yawn*
Rage_3K_Moiz said:
France's trying to be top dog over the US will prove to be a costly price to pay. Almost every program, music, video, picture or document u need is avaialble on networks like Gnutella. So inviting it all in is like opening the floodgates to piracy and organized crime.
Mictlantecuhtli said:
Did you read the article completely? It says filesharing would be legal because there would be a royalty fee added to the cost. We pay a similar fee for nearly all recording mediums and players here (blank CDs, DVDs, MP3 players etc.), it just doesn't cover downloading.I don't think this will affect anything much in France, and I hope that other countries would follow this route.
Handyman said:
That's a big surprise, but definetly a step in the right direction. Hope it catches on in other countries too. Unlimited downloading and P2P at an acceptable monthly price, let's say 30$, woluld benefit both users and the music companies.
asphix said:
[b]Originally posted by Rod_Massoudi:[/b][quote] If this were the case, intellectual property would completely be disbanded in France, and as a result, NO COUNTRY with any intellectual property will run any sort of business in France in fear of losing their edge. [Edited by Rod_Massoudi on 2005-12-26 21:21:20][/quote]While reading the article I had the same thought cross my mind. I also must add, I doubt this move has any relation to France's stance in relation to the USA.This doesnt necessarily mean the death of media in france. Media producers in France will wail and moan for a while until they realize if they price things more compeditively, and add features you cant download (box art, contests bundled with product, posters and other incentives) people will purchase rather than download.If it starts to work well, and more countries join in, this could slowly turn into a global change. And for the better. The days of brick and morter stores are over, especially for things like movies and music. In the next 5 years we'll see a complete transition to digitally downloaded content. I think this is a smart move for France as they are pushing that idea and keeping the road wide and clear for whatever innovations, ideas and processes come along.When faced with no other choice, does a company go bankrupt while stamping its feet and pouting? Or does it change its business plan and find a new way to capitalize through the channels provided? My bet is on the latter.**edit** funny thought. Think of this as somewhat of a corporate enima. It will flush out the old companies that can't adapt/innovate while making room for those who can and will!Of course this is all speculation on my part. I could be completely off the mark. To me, this would be an ideal outcome though, and I don't currently see any reason it could not become a reality.[Edited by asphix on 2005-12-27 07:32:19]
mentaljedi said:
Though it would be REALLY funny if this was a stab at the US, i think France for one is being logical. They know that they can't stop piracy, so why not make money out of it?
Bartzy said:
If file-sharing will be legal, I'm sure there will be a lot of law breaches, and many people will use them. I think that if a country would like to do such a step towards legalizing file-sharing, it needs to have a whole new department that would deal with this subject only. If not, things will get out of control and file-sharing lawsuits will be everywhere.Funny that France is stepping forward where US stepped backwards. I hope every country will endorse this move and act the same.
nathanskywalker said:
(The actors’ and musicians’ branch of France’s largest trade union, the CFDT, said the plan "would mean the death of our country’s music and audiovisual industries.")No kidding.
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