Intel debuts notebook Napa

By Derek Sooman on January 10, 2006, 8:07 PM
The Las Vegas Consumer Electronics Show has now seen the unveiling of the dual-core low-power Centrino processor. This new chip is part of a new three-chip family also consisting of Intel's Mobile 945 chipset and Pro/Wireless 3945a/b/g chip. It is built on a 65nm process and has a number of new features built into it which enable maximum efficiency and lower power consumption.

These include what the company calls Dynamic Power Coordination and Enhanced Deeper Sleep with Dynamic Cache Sizing, a new power savings mechanism that enables the Smart Cache Sizing Cache to dynamically flush system memory based on demand, or during periods of inactivity. The idea is to channel power only to those parts of the processor that need it.
Intel claims that laptops utilising the new processor can get five hours of battery life from a standard battery. Another welcome feature is Digital Media Boost, which is claimed to enhance floating point operation.




User Comments: 11

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mtyson8 said:
well, its just the next thing to do. Dual core is here to stay, and if your going to get the most out of your PC, dual core is the way to go. I suspect though, to have your next purchase be dual core, not necessarily rush to go get them by next month.
barfarf said:
5 hours of battery and life from a standard battery and dual core!! I dont believe it. I shall wait for the reviews to come out. At work we have several of the new ibm thinkpad T series (t40,41, t42,t43) and even with the extended battery they dont last 5 hours of work.
PUTALE said:
it's interesting that I have not seen intel's mobile cpu support 64bit. I wonder when will intel implement 64bit in the rmobile cpu.
Race said:
Big improvements for a laptop, but this is a 32 bit processor.If I were contemplating a notebook purchase this year, I wouldn't invest in one I couldn't upgrade to run the 64-bit version of Vista. In fact, I'd hold off to get a portable with Vista 64 pre-installed. If nothing else, debuting these with only 32-bit support sounds like a marketing snaffo, with more and more 64-bit apps coming soon. [Edited by Race on 2006-01-11 00:50:15]
exscind said:
[b]Originally posted by Race:[/b][quote]If nothing else, debuting these with only 32-bit support sounds like a marketing snaffo, with more and more 64-bit apps coming soon.[/quote]Err... I must have missed the memo somewhere then. Last time I tried to install 64-bit Windows, 75% of programs wouldn't install correctly, and an abundance of programs wouldn't run correctly. I haven't heard much about softwares moving to the 64-bit platform, and when I tried it, it sure proved that notion. And I have not seen any indication that abundant 64-bit applications are arriving any time soon.And as for the Dynamic Power Coordination and Enhanced Deeper Sleep, it sounds great for users who are on the go (ie., running off of the lithium batteries). For me though, it becomes my crucifixation. To me, if I'm buying a computer with 1.86GHz, I better run that darn machine at 1.86GHz. I understand how useful it is on the go as well as to prevent overheating, but somehow I just can't let go of the fact that the computer is underclocking. It kills the overclocker child in me I guess :).
MonkeyMan said:
This is great, a notebook with long lasting battery life. This is needed, because from what I've heard, most notebooks have to be rechared within a couple of hours. This is a plus, and also, I believe that in the near future, notebooks may not run off of batteries, but solar energy from the sun lol. Leave it out in the sun all day, and then you would have a charged notebook at night lol. Great concept, and idea, but who knows, it could happen.
Cartz said:
[b]Originally posted by exscind:[/b][quote]Err... I must have missed the memo somewhere then. Last time I tried to install 64-bit Windows, 75% of programs wouldn't install correctly, and an abundance of programs wouldn't run correctly. I haven't heard much about softwares moving to the 64-bit platform, and when I tried it, it sure proved that notion. And I have not seen any indication that abundant 64-bit applications are arriving any time soon.[/quote]Windows Vista is slated for release in late 2006, but if you ask me likely early 2007. When it hits shelves, 64 bit will become the standard very quickly.The fact is, when you're buying a new laptop, built with brand new bleeding edge technology, you don't expect the architecture to be unable to execute the majority of programs that will be released in 1.5 to 2 years time.There may not be too many 64 bit apps on the 6 month to 1 year horizon, but before a normal user would expect to have to replace this laptop, 64 bit will be the norm. People just need to have more foresight when purchasing computer hardware these days. The alternative is ending up with technology that is completely obsolete in under a year.
exscind said:
Sure Cartz, I agree. Technology evolves too fast these days, and what someone buys today may very well be obsolete tomorrow. But when I replied, it was directly in reference to the "now." Of course, one can wait until the softwares are supporting 64-bit computing; but as you've said yourself, the likelihood is 2007. I'm not opposed to not buy items today at the "32-bit" world, but it seems a bit awkward solely for the reason of wanting to make the jump to the 64-bit platform.I do agree that consumers should be aware of what new products are debuting when. But the fact is, if you're holding off on buying a computer in fear of the next "jump" in technology... well, you're never going to buy anything :). I personally agree with you, but I certainly don't expect this rule to apply to everyone. To some, switching computer and/or parts once a year to 1.5 years is completely normal, especially with the rapid growth of technology these days.
dr_roman said:
As I see it, laptoms are meant more for the corporate market. A regular user would be foolish to invest in a portable system. It was designed to give the buisiness-man a solution for the well known phrase "time is money". When the backround for your purchase is to use it to make money, then future technology is not your primary concern. U need a P.C here & now, so you can continue to make money on the go. That is all. When the tool becomes outdated, you replace it. If you are one of those people who needs it as a gaming machine or just to save space, then you represent the minority of the consumers it was designed for in the first place. Laptops are meant only as invesments for future income. To mistake them as proper gaming rigs or anything else high-endish' of the sort is a missconcept, or better yet, a big waste of money.
buttus said:
My question is this.I am an IT Solutions and System seller. When the dual cores first appeared on the horizon, some VERY hard questions were asked. Frankly and up until this point the answers have not been given...and there they have, well, let's just say they have been vague and open to interruptation.The question is. With Dual Cores, how with the licensing of software (Microsoft not being the least of them) be affected? Symantec/Veritas, Microsoft, Adobe etc have yet to state anything clear on this. Does the emmergence of a dual core notebook mean this issue is resolved?I think it's an * thing. In other words:* - May be subject to change without prior noticeTime to read EULA's again
mentaljedi said:
No idea buttlus. But back to this new notebook, i won't get it but i'll be interested to see its descendants if you know what i mean. Potential is there but i'm not convinced that this laptop is what i'd choose.
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