Technology can revolutionise education, say UK government

By Derek Sooman on January 11, 2006, 1:07 PM
In the UK, Education Secretary Ruth Kelly is claiming that if better online applications were available that could allow parents to become more fully involved with their child's education, the results would be very significant. Better online information sources would allow parents to monitor school performance and make more informed decisions about their children's education, Kelly claims.

Speaking at the British Education and Training (BETT) Show in London on Wednesday, Kelly praised the role that technology can play in speeding up the government's education reforms. In particular, she said the Internet would allow parents to "influence learning" to a much greater degree than has ever been previously possible.

"ICT can open up our education system and make it much more accessible to parents," Kelly said.




User Comments: 15

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Vaerilis said:
I don't see why this system hasn't been implemented in at least several countries yet. It makes parents easier to track their children's performace, spot weaknesses in their children's schoolwork, and it's not really hard to get a broadband line to every public school.
Cartz said:
I agree completely, my university offers online transcripts that are updated sometimes in mere hours after I complete a test. Not that at this point in my education I require my parents looking over my shoulder. But it is convenient for me to track my own progress. (and then to report said progress, slightly embellished, to the folks back home)It would be terribly easy to set up a database system that stored all of a school's student's marks and made them accessible to their parents via some form of web portal. I would assume that the only reason that this hasn't already been done is due to the miserably low amounts of funding that most public schools recieve these days. I suppose political pork projects and military spending take precedence over giving our future generation the best start possible. Sigh...
iluvnug said:
Not only could they implement it to monitor grades, but they could implement an online text book and exercises, tests, and quizzes for students to do and their parents could access the actual work their children have done and the teacher comments so they can communicate with their children about their performance. It will all around help children get more comfortable with computers as well as improve their performance by getting parents more involved. Children's learning abilities are very much influenced by the involvement of the family.
exscind said:
Many colleges/universities in the United States already utilize the Internet to display academic information. Yes, transcripts is the foremost runner in this field. But for something like college application, the Internet-submission is also becoming the "norm." The lack of funds would be a factor into why this has not been widespread yet. But in the long run it just saves that much manpower. In terms of transcripts, before one has to go to the Administration office and order one (I'm not even talking about official transcripts), which will take around a week. But with the Internet, a simple browing reduces that time to what, 2 minutes? Technology is changing; it would be better suit to put the Administration staff that work in departments where it is easier and faster to do electronically to another department or another task. This way, it reduces congestion of numerous people asking for transcripts (especially near end of each semester) and increases efficiency in other areas of the Administration office.For the parents who have kids in high school or lower, this gives them an opportunity to track the progress intimately. I know when I was in high school, I had a Physics AP teacher who has his entire gradesheet online. So if I wanted to check my grade, all I have to do is look online. It included homework assignments, quizzes, exams, you name it. It just makes life simpler. And for parents who want reassurance that their children are doing well in the class, they can just check online as well instead of the dreaded teacher-parent meeting. And in a society where many parents are workaholics, the aforementioned meeting is very difficult.[Edited by exscind on 2006-01-11 13:54:02]
asphix said:
Basically the important thing to note here is that this would give parents a real time method to interact with and influence their childs education. It gives parents some power and a means of in depth understanding in how their children are doing.I think its a great idea. This also would set up a great foundation for multiple possibiliites as others have mentioned. Online course documentation. Online tutoring. Online forums for parents to communicate with each other. It would really help to bring the community back into school systems that we are slowly seeing fall away due to very busy schedules in modern society.
Cartz said:
[b]Originally posted by iluvnug:[/b][quote]Not only could they implement it to monitor grades, but they could implement an online text book and exercises, tests, and quizzes for students to do and their parents could access the actual work their children have done and the teacher comments so they can communicate with their children about their performance. It will all around help children get more comfortable with computers as well as improve their performance by getting parents more involved. Children's learning abilities are very much influenced by the involvement of the family. [/quote]I like that idea, putting a students homework online, some sample tests and quizzes for them to practice, as well as teachers commentary would really serve to bring the parents into the classroom.Although, when you start providing that kind of service, and start to actually integrate the internet into the education experience, you start to build barriers for certain students. In every school, there will be those from less fortunate backgrounds whose family cannot afford a computer with internet access. Usually these students are the ones that require the most guidance and support, as their parents may work longer hours, or be in a single parent family where there is simply not enough hours in the day for the parent to really get involved with the childs schoolwork, they're too busy putting food on the table. I think if you start too much material into the digital realm, you could be punishing those kids who are most deserving of the help.
Mictlantecuhtli said:
Put everything online, abandon classrooms, prepare the kids for the social life of nerds, never meeting people face to face.
mastronaut said:
Technology can revolutionise education?Some editor needs to go back to school for writing that mis-spelled headline....
exscind said:
[b]Originally posted by mastronaut:[/b][quote]Technology can revolutionise education?Some editor needs to go back to school for writing that mis-spelled headline....[/quote]Notice the article stemmed from the U.K. Great Britain English use "s" where the United States use "z." So personalize = personalise, revolutionize = revolutionse. Great Britain also use "u" after o in many instances, so honor becomes honour, etc.
Cartz said:
Lol! See online education is great! Even in a news forum we got a spelling lesson, followed by a lesson in the 'foreign' languages.Quick, someone break out the Calc! I need to learn how to integrate!
phantasm66 said:
[b]Originally posted by Mictlantecuhtli:[/b][quote]Put everything online, abandon classrooms, prepare the kids for the social life of nerds, never meeting people face to face.[/quote]That's a post and a half!
MonkeyMan said:
Well, I must say that this is a great idea. It could very well increase the UK's education reform, but only one thing, how much would that cost? great ideas, are always great, but money, will always be money. That's my motto lol.
otmakus said:
[b]Originally posted by Mictlantecuhtli:[/b][quote]Put everything online, abandon classrooms, prepare the kids for the social life of nerds, never meeting people face to face.[/quote]And there will be a whole new way of bullying, this time by the nerds, to the jocks.Anyway, this is nothing new, a wide range of universities have already implemented this, it's just a matter of time until this becomes more mainstream and reaches more schools, from kindergarten to universities.
nathanskywalker said:
[quote]Speaking at the British Education and Training (BETT) Show in London on Wednesday, Kelly praised the role that technology can play in speeding up the government's education reforms. In particular, she said the Internet would allow parents to "influence learning" to a much greater degree than has ever been previously possible.[/quote]Of course, the parent has to have some comprehension of computers...really, i think it would just be better for parents to teach childeren themselvs...but of course, that is too often just not possible.
mentaljedi said:
[b]Originally posted by exscind:[/b][quote]The lack of funds would be a factor into why this has not been widespread yet. [/quote]Lack of funds? This is the US and UK we're talking about right? One of the richest nations if not THE richest nations in the world. And they can't afford broadband?
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