Intel disposes of parallel ATA on ICH8

By Justin Mann on February 20, 2006, 12:53 PM
Say goodbye to legacy, at least for parallel ATA. Intel's latest revision on their ICH chipsets, ICH8, will give many benefits to the user of the system, including Active Management Technology, which system administrators are sure to be happy about. It'll also support native RAID with up to 6 disks... SATA only. Something has to be sacrificed, of course, and that sacrifice is the Parallel ATA connector. No more IDE CDROMs or hard drives for the newer Intel boards.

That will be a little tough on people upgrading, because even though SATA hard drives are common, SATA optical drives are much less so. It seems that the aging standard floppy connector really did outlive parallel ATA to a noticeable degree. Intel is also disposing of the stock AC97 Audio, which for an avid gamer or enthusiast really won't mean much. The new ICH8 chips will appear in both entry-level and performance-oriented boards based on different revisions.




User Comments: 8

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PanicX said:
I can't see this being too popular with the current prices of SATA optical drives. And why on earth keep the floppy connector? Why hasn't this been replaced by USB drives yet?
mentaljedi said:
[b]Originally posted by PanicX:[/b][quote]I can't see this being too popular with the current prices of SATA optical drives. And why on earth keep the floppy connector? Why hasn't this been replaced by USB drives yet?[/quote]Lol. I still use floppies. I think, for example, that a lot of usb drives are at the back of some desktops which make them annoying. Plus floppies are cheaper even if they hold less than 1 picture... thats all that matters to some.
DragonMaster said:
[quote]And why on earth keep the floppy connector?[/quote]To be able to install Windows with unsupported SATA controllers without having to DIY a Windows CD![quote] I think, for example, that a lot of usb drives are at the back of some desktops which make them annoying.[/quote]But often when you get a new computer you can put it on the front.Throwing out AC'97? That's a really good idea they have! AC'97 is made to have crappy sound.The real problem is that there's no more PATA CD-ROM support. [quote]Lol. I still use floppies.[/quote]I was sad to see that my father's MSI RD480 Neo2-FI supports only 1 floppy drive... I can't put the 5.25" drive! (STILL WORKING black Mitsubishi)There's just a problem with that thing... you need to keep an older cable with also slot-type connectors to plug it in...
PanicX said:
[b]Originally posted by PanicX[/b][quote]And why on earth keep the floppy connector?[/quote][b]Originally posted by DragonMaster:[/b][quote]To be able to install Windows with unsupported SATA controllers without having to DIY a Windows CD![/quote]Thats not a reason for a floppy connector. If the system bios emulated a USB device as a floppy controller then you could use any USB drive for this function, and if you still wanted a floppy, you could use a USB floppy and not have an unnecessary ribbon cable impeeding case airflow.Not to mention that many OEM boxes ship now without floppies. If there's no need for them on OEM's why not create a completely legacy free systemboard?
Nic said:
What if you only have one CDROM drive (e.g. Shuttle PC) and are installing Windows?You can't copy the drivers that came on a floppy to your USB key, because you have yet to install Windows, and Windows won't install to your SATA drive because it doesn't have the drivers. Now you need two computers just to load that USB key with the SATA drivers.If your computer is old it may not have USB floppy emulation, and USB keys aren't as cheap as floppies, so they are likely to go missing if you leave them lying around, and you may only have one of these...[Edited by Nic on 2006-02-21 06:33:42]
PanicX said:
[b]Originally posted by PanicX:[/b][quote]and if you still wanted a floppy, you could use a USB floppy and not have an unnecessary ribbon cable impeeding case airflow.[/quote][b]Originally posted by Nic:[/b][quote]If your computer is old it may not have USB floppy emulation, and USB keys aren't as cheap as floppies, so they are likely to go missing if you leave them lying around, and you may only have one of these...[/quote]This would be on [b]NEW[/b] computers, hence the lack of support for legacy devices. And an inability to keep track of your hardware is definitely not a reason to keep a floppy connector.[Edited by PanicX on 2006-02-21 14:40:29]
DragonMaster said:
[quote]and if you still wanted a floppy, you could use a USB floppy and not have an unnecessary ribbon cable impeeding case airflow. [/quote]You don't have to plug something in every connectors you can find on the mainboard, you know?
Nic said:
I agree that the legacy floppy and parallel ATA devices should go, but only after Microsoft have the necessary SATA drivers build into the windows CD and CDROM drives come with SATA as standard. Until then it's only going to cause problems.
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