ASUS to partner with SiL for next gen motherboards

By Justin Mann on June 20, 2006, 7:18 PM
In a press release issued issued today, Asus has released some interesting information regarding the future of their motherboards. One of the most common manufacturers for RAID controller chips built onto motherboards, Silicon Image, will be getting a definite ego boost by Asus's decision to use the SiI 4723 SteelVine chip to provide RAID functionality. More than just an upgrade from the omnipresent Sil 3114, the 4723 doesn't add native RAID-5 support but does include the standard RAID0/1/JBOD modes that the majority of home users enjoy. The 4723 does support native functions like auto rebuild and auto failover, and is a SATA-II device, definitely nice considering how most new SATA drives support SATA-II.

The first ASUS board to make an appearance with this chip will be the P5W DH Deluxe. It'll be interesting to see performance results of it once it hits the market.




User Comments: 7

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DragonMaster said:
Not SiL but SiI (capital "i").[quote]More than just an upgrade from the omnipresent Sil 3114[/quote]SiI 311x-series was released in 2003! :shock: There's still some old SATA I SiI chips on mobos? All I can say is that these chips with the latest BIOS and driver are pretty good.[Edited by DragonMaster on 2006-06-20 20:58:08]
asphix said:
When will it be released??? The P5B Deluxe is ALL i'm waiting for!!! I keep hearing about it and neurotically checking newegg.com and news channels for any info.I hope we can expect it before July 23rd.
canadian said:
How many home users acually use raid though?
nic said:
Most home users don't know what raid is...but to anyone that ever lost data from a hard drive failure, raid is a must have feature. Preferably raid 5.
Malibu Stacey said:
[b]Originally posted by nic:[/b][quote]Most home users don't know what raid is...but to anyone that ever lost data from a hard drive failure, raid is a must have feature. Preferably raid 5.[/quote]RAID 5 isn't a must have feature for home users if you're referring to data backup. RAID 1 is. There is a huge difference most notably the number of physical disks required but the differences in access times between the 2 are also a factor.The SiI 3114 chipset does actually support RAID 5. I have a DFI NForce2 Ultra Infinity (yes it's 3 or more years old) & having updated the SiI 3114 bios to the latest release it supports RAID5 although I haven't forked out for an extra 250GB drive to test it I have heard other people on dfistreet have.
asphix said:
I have been using raid 0 on an every day basis since 2003. I have 2x SATA drives in my old system. My new system will run dual 320GB SATAII drives in a raid 0 config.Data loss isnt a huge concern as I backup anything that is extremely important onto DVD's. Also, as long as you consider cooling issues drive failure resulting in data loss can be minimized. My raid 0 config has been running 3 years 24-7 without a single hitch. Of course I have invested a decent amount of thought and research into optimal cooling for my old rig (and my new one as well).Raid is an ever increasing solution for DIY-ers. If by "home user" you're talking about the average joe.. you're right, they probably dont know what RAID is.. however, how many average joes do you think will go out and purchase an ASUS motherboard? Chances are they'll just go buy a Dell, HP or Compaq and call it a day. I'd say about 60-70% of the people who purchase stand-alone motherboards for upgrade and new system configs know what raid is and the benefits it can provide.Now, whether they use it or not is another question entirely.
DragonMaster said:
[quote] Most home users don't know what raid is...but to anyone that ever lost data from a hard drive failure, raid is a must have feature. Preferably raid 5.[/quote]Not RAID 0 ;)If I put a RAID setup on my next computer, it's going to be a RAID 0. Even if the chances of losing data are greater, they aren't too big. (I didn't see a lot of HDDs dying if they weren't defective from the beginning or dropped)I might at least backup important data online, on an USB stick, DVD or an other HDD.
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