RIAA demands $3,000 each from 50 Ohio students

By Justin Mann on March 9, 2007, 8:39 PM
Despite numerous claims to being a friendlier company that works towards “solutions”, the RIAA is continuing its relentless assault on downloaders, particularly college students the past year. Now, they are asking for $3,000 each from 50 students at Ohio University. Barring the students actually paying the $3,000, the RIAA is threatening to sue each and every one of them, for up to $590,000 to the worst “offender”.

They certainly aren't winning any PR battles. For each song, the RIAA is claiming $750 in damages.




User Comments: 5

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phantasm66 said:
Yeah, that's really a solution to P2P trading of illegal content.... turn young people into criminals. These kinds of tactics have been tried before and don't make any difference, meanwhile a group of young people have their futures ruined and for what??
mkatz2m said:
The RIAA cartel is going to make sure that students, the future leaders and family heads, will never buy any music sponsored by the RIAA/record labels. I really believe this kind of action will continue to directly hurt the present and future of the record companies.
nathanskywalker said:
[b]Originally posted by phantasm66:[/b][quote]Yeah, that's really a solution to P2P trading of illegal content.... turn young people into criminals. These kinds of tactics have been tried before and don't make any difference, meanwhile a group of young people have their futures ruined and for what??[/quote]Not to be disagreeing with you, but honestly, they did it to themselves. They made the choice to "break the law", ridiculous or not, it's the law.
black_death said:
[b]Originally posted by nathanskywalker:[/b][quote]Not to be disagreeing with you, but honestly, they did it to themselves. They made the choice to "break the law", ridiculous or not, it's the law.[/quote]If it's the law then why don't the police arrest them? Oh that's right because the RIAA doesn't have any real evidence that will hold up in court, expensive lawyers can often leverage the amount of evidence that is needed but when your company is contantly in the news sueing students and dead people the jury won't exactly be as gullible as the old uniformed judges who allow the cases.
9Nails said:
[b]Originally posted by mkatz2m:[/b][quote]The RIAA cartel is going to make sure that students, the future leaders and family heads, will never buy any music sponsored by the RIAA/record labels. I really believe this kind of action will continue to directly hurt the present and future of the record companies. [/quote]I don't understand why they persist. P2P does traffic some current off-the-shelf artists. However, a share of the transfers includes music that you cannot find on the shelf. In essence, P2P had supplanted radio listening and stimulated sales. Now that music isn't as easy to find, sales figures have dropped. Hrmph.I suppose that if your customers aren't listening and don't buy your music, the American way is to sue them for their money.Will these rounds of copyright suits continue to hurt them? I'm still in the boycott camp, and I know many others are too. Not to mention that the nearly Atari 2600 age Compact Disk technology desperately requires an audio update. And the expensive and DRM laden MP3 format war isnít justice of any means.
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