ARM preparing Android-based phone

By Justin Mann on February 8, 2008, 7:51 PM
Google's Android platform has been talked about for a long while but no products have come to market based upon it yet. That is soon about to change with ARM prepared to introduce a prototype phone that will use Android as its base. What makes this particularly interesting is that ARM is not a member of the group that promotes Android, meaning they obviously found some worth of their own accord in using it.

Android was received with mixed reactions at launch. Microsoft, for instance, poked fun at Google, asserting they didn't know what they were getting into. While still in the prototype stages, perhaps this phone will be able to show the world what Android is capable of (or not).




User Comments: 3

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thejedislayer said:
I recently read an old article from Techspot.com Reference: [url]http://www.techspot.com/news/27870-google-defends-andro
d.html[/url] I would be a bit less enthusiastic about such an open source market. The reason I feel the way I do, is because I feel that hackers could/can easily find ways to hack a user's cell phone etc. Stealing vital information such as phone numbers etc. Just a thought.
PanicX said:
[b]Originally posted by thejedislayer:[/b][quote]I would be a bit less enthusiastic about such an open source market. The reason I feel the way I do, is because I feel that hackers could/can easily find ways to hack a user's cell phone etc. Stealing vital information such as phone numbers etc. Just a thought. [/quote]An age old debate. Unfortunately, at first glance many people have the same opinion. But if you really think about and analyze the scenarios which are bound to happen. Open source is in my opinion always the more reliable option.Here's my reasoning why. Basically the idea comes down to a simple question. Can a program be made completely secure (uncrackable)? If so, no amount of source code review will allow the device to be hacked. Allowing the source to be open, not only assures any programmers of the security in the code, but also allows others to learn and develop against the source. Closing the source has no benefit in this situation.On the other side, if you believe that no device can be programmed securely, or that every device can be cracked, then does closing the source protect you? In this scenario, open source would allow more in depth searching for the flaws that must exist, and allow compromises to be more easily identified. It also allows for proactive searching by end users as well to identify and fix these flaws before or after exploits exist. With closed source, you've removed 1 of many exploit discovery methods and simultaneously provided those exploiting a discovered vulnerability with a lengthened patch window, as only those with the source can correct the issue or pro actively search them out. Not to mention you can never be sure that there aren't functions with the program that exist without your knowledge which would have affected your buying decision in the first place (ie. Private data reporting). Basically, if closed source prevented all exploit discovery, I don't think anyone can argue against it. However, this is clearly not the case as closed source programs are constantly being patched for exploit code found in the wild. Check [url=http://www.ntbugtraq.com]NT Bugtraq[/url] for examples. I could see supporting closed source even if it provided a reasonable amount of security of preventing exploit detection. However, most security researchers and experience crackers already know where the most common mistakes are made in coding and consistently probe for these shortcomings (usually buffer overflows and such). The only point I can see in advocating closed source is in the event that an exploit or back door is intentionally put into the software and you wish to hide it from the public.
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