AVG Free Edition 8.0 released

By on April 25, 2008, 11:45 AM
The free edition of the AVG anti-virus has been a TechSpot favorite for quite sometime thanks to its nearly bloat-free characteristics, and for those of you who have had to go through the pre-installed Norton nightmare, you know that's quite the feat.

This new 8.0 version of AVG Free inherits some of the features from its commercial counterparts like anti-spyware protection, performance and Vista compatibility improvements, as well as a better looking interface. All in all, AVG Free should provide a very decent bare bones anti-virus service if you don't need a complete security suite, or in other words, it should be quite enough if you are simply looking for an anti-virus to run on your personal PC environment.




User Comments: 17

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windmill007 said:
Sweet! Going to check this out right now. This is the best free anti-virus bar none. Does what it needs to do without slowing down the system. Some of us don't need the complete protection that slows your system to a crawl...But hey your safe ;)
jonmcc33 said:
Actually, Avast 4.8 is a far better option than AVG bar none. Although it now includes anti-spyware as AVG 8.0 does, Avast also includes anti-rootkit included with the free package. In addition, from personal experience using AVG 7.5 on my server, AVG does a poor job of protecting from and cleaning viruses. I lost a lot of valuable data because AVG failed to "protect" me. So try Avast 4.8 instead if you really want anti-virus protection and more. The best in my book bar none until someone somehow proves otherwise.
TimeParadoX said:
Agreed with jonmcc33,Avast! 4.8 is very good, I've used it for atleast 2 years and never got infected as opposed to AVG which only took 2 months until it said "virus detected".
nirkon said:
[b]Originally posted by jonmcc33:[/b][quote]Actually, Avast 4.8 is a far better option than AVG bar none. Although it now includes anti-spyware as AVG 8.0 does, Avast also includes anti-rootkit included with the free package. In addition, from personal experience using AVG 7.5 on my server, AVG does a poor job of protecting from and cleaning viruses. I lost a lot of valuable data because AVG failed to "protect" me. So try Avast 4.8 instead if you really want anti-virus protection and more. The best in my book bar none until someone somehow proves otherwise.[/quote]I've used AVG for quite a while because Kaspersky took too much resources for me and the startup turned from really fast to really slow, I didn't want that, so I switched to AVG.AVG has been able to clean all the viruses I came across on the web, it detects one before a file finishes downloading, when it's in a rar... I haven't had anything wrong while using AVG, but whatever floats your boat.[quote]Avast! 4.8 is very good, I've used it for atleast 2 years and never got infected as opposed to AVG which only took 2 months 'till it said "virus detected". [/quote]I hope that was a joke, what that basically means is that during 2 years Avast never detected a virus... run a scanner... fast...and besides, the viruses trying to enter your computer come from the sites you visit, not so much on the AV.
geechiesway said:
Antivir is better than AVG and Avast. Whenever I have to clean an infected computer at work, Antivir finds viruses that AVG, Avast, Symantec, and McAfee miss. It's also very low on system resources as well. [url]http://www.free-av.com[/url]
canadian said:
I used to use AVG until I actually got a virus, and AVG did little more than point and laugh at me. I switched to Avast and so far I am impressed, I havn't gotten a virus on it yet so I dont know how it will handle it.
messenger777 said:
Just a note about Avast is that it didn't pass the VB100 test conducted recently.check this link: [url]http://www.itwire.com/content/view/17579/53/[/url]Others that didn't pass included: McAfee, Sophos, Trend Micro, BitDefender.Norton Anti-Virus, AVG, Kaspersky and, surprisingly, Microsoft’s OneCare, passed the test with flying colours.My thoughts is that avast is better for machines that have lower specs, as AVG does use more... it's more noticeable on a slow computer.However in my IT experience, I feel AVG does a better job in detecting viruses. Remember, with the amount of unknown junk we expose ourselves to everyday on the net, it's a good thing when your software says it detects a virus... it's not a bad thing
lswinney said:
Email scanning in AVG free is disabled after 30 days. This is something new and is a very important feature to lose.I believe download protection is also disabled. I'm not sure about this.[Edited by lswinney on 2008-04-26 07:56:14]
lswinney said:
Okay, here's the scoop on the 30 day trial of email scanning:Re: avg 8 free email scanner: is it on a 30 day trial?Posted by: michaelhd - AVG Team (IP Logged) Date: April 26, 2008 04:03PMDear AVG Free Users... Cmon - you know us better than that! Cnet have obviously confused our free trail version with the AVG Free version. NOTHING on your AVG 8.0 Free Edition will expire after 30 days!
Xuvious said:
Why does AVG 8.0 try to shut down Avast?One thing that truly annoys me is to d/l a program that attempts to change my computer without my knowledge, or approval.When AVG runs a scan, Avast blanks the screen with a warning that AVG is trying to change its .ini files.Shame on you Grisoft!
nirkon said:
[b]Originally posted by Xuvious:[/b][quote]Why does AVG 8.0 try to shut down Avast?One thing that truly annoys me is to d/l a program that attempts to change my computer without my knowledge, or approval.When AVG runs a scan, Avast blanks the screen with a warning that AVG is trying to change its .ini files.Shame on you Grisoft![/quote]I don't mean to question your intelligence... but... first of all 2 anti-viruses installed together will conflict!Secondly, AVG doesn't change files... it deep-scans them so Avast may have a problem with that...as I can see, you reached this conclusion by yourself, if AVG was changing user files without user consent the whole freaking AVG community would be on it like a leech, and we would have known about it by now.
Xuvious said:
Why doesn't other AV software cause Avast to sound a warning?Just looking at a file should not cause a warning, deep scanning or not, changing it would. Unless, by your use of the term "deep scanning" you mean "to change" the files.While testing different aspects of the new ver. of AVG one configuration is to see how it gets along with other software, including other AV software that may be installed, either idle or active.And you claim that running two AV programs "will" conflict is pure rubbish. It depends on the software whether it will conflict with other AV and if it does then it's a substandard product. Do you have a habit of being patronizing toward people? Telling me you don't mean to "question my intelligence... but".[Edited by Xuvious on 2008-04-27 13:32:46]
tedster said:
never run more than 1 antivirus program on a system at one time.
messenger777 said:
I second tedster. We are not questioning anyones intelligence or trying patronize other people. This is not personal.The "idea" of running 2 anti-virus on the same system is highly unrecommended, as certain services provided by both parties can clash with each other. One classic example was late last year, when running IE 7 and firefox 2 on the same computer opened up a vulnerability on the PC. Neither party was 'really' at fault. Just so happened when both were installed on your PC, boom, there's a hole in your security. Think of the problems that can occur with having quicktime, itunes, Real and WMP on the same PC (fell free to mix and match). If the files associations are not set up right.... chagrin. (from personal experience)Of course if you are running light weight AV software like Avast and AVG together some effects might not be so noticeable. I personally think that running Norton, McAfee or Kapersky (again, feel free to mix and match) on the same PC will not benefit anybody.The point being is that the "idea" of running 2 anti-virus on the same system is not encouraged. Ask the AV vendors or even Microsoft and they will probably say the same thing. (Microsoft will say "Live Onecare will meet all your needs... for a price :p".) [Edited by messenger777 on 2008-04-28 03:28:28]
ravisunny2 said:
I had a better experience with Avast than AVG Antivirus. Still use AVG Antispy, though.
technologyone said:
I would not presume to argue the point with anyone who is brand loyal to Avast, but I will say that my experience with the software is a mixed bag. I found the software when I had a particularly troublesome virus on a customer's computer that I just could not seem to get off. Avast did the trick to get this one virus off, but bogged the system down so bad I removed it immediately after the excessively slow system scan was finished. FYI, this was a few years ago on an Athlon XP probably 2500+ or 2600+ with 512MB RAM and running in safe mode so there was no excuse for the software to run slow. Since I did have good luck with Avast, we tried it in our business on several test machines with various hardware configurations, but regardless of configuration or Windows version, the performance always took a noticable hit and to be honest, the software just looked hokey so we never have revisited it and would not recommend it to anyone. Now we are an IT Consulting firm focusing primarily on break-fix services for our small business customers. We also service a fair number of residential computers for walk-in customers as well (about 20 per week). AVG is a staple product for our company for many reasons. The fact that the company actually has a solid business model that allows for the making of profits (which makes us believe that they will be around for a long time unlike so many free software vendors that are here and gone tomorrow) AND the distribution of a free product for single-user residential customers is a big deal. Equally big is the fact that AVG pricing is far superior to Symantec Antivirus Corporate Edition (now called Endpoint Protection) which was our SOLE recommendation to protect business networks for years. Also the fact that they have products actually designed for business use (Exchange / SQL / Windows Server protection) that are actually in the same product family as the products our users are using at home helps us in both sales and support. But the single most important aspect that has sent AVG to the top of our recommended protection list at this point is that it works. As many users have posted and is apparent by the millions of AVG licenses out there, the product (free or paid) requires drastically fewer system resources (both memory and CPU time) and simply does not fail to protect our customers day after day. Of course, as with any solution (including Avast) NO software is infallible and malicious attackers will always continue to look for ways to thwart any protection that you put in place. But, that is yet another nice thing about Grisoft with the AVG line; they are not afraid to release new versions of the products at a rapid pace to adapt to the ever-changing threats. Case in point is the new real-time malware protection afforded by AVG 8.0 (you no longer have the antivirus and antispyware component). Go load up the latest version 8.0 Free and visit the spy sheriff website (not going to post the link but you know what to do) to see it in action.And lastly I would say one of the most annoying things about the IT field is that so many people want everything for free. You do realize that some developer spent time writing every piece of software that you use, right? Has anyone who chooses Avast for the rootkit protection or whatever other reason ever donated to the developer for the valuable service? I doubt it and before someone gets the wise idea to say "oh I donated 50 cents via PayPal, use your noggin and realise that I am making a point. To the poster who said that it left their server vulnerable, I would say "What in the world are you doing trying to use a free antivirus software on a SERVER?". And to anyone thinking of running 2 antivirus programs on one Windows PC, all I can say is "NO educated IT consultant or computer technician would EVER recommend that configuration". It is not a matter of if you will have conflicts, but when and you can expect very poor system performance and even possible data corruption (ever notice a window saying to disable your antivirus before installing XYZ program?). It is not crappy software that causes this, it is just a simple fact acknowledged by all antivirus software developers and has to do with the fact that both softwares scan files in real time.The short and skinny? Free AVG is our only free antivirus recommendation as it is tried and true and people should not be afraid to spend a few bucks for a quality product if they outgrow or want more features than a free product will provide. Whether you want to believe it or not, you get what you pay for. ;)[Edited by technologyone on 2008-05-03 16:15:36]
Nirkon said:
I had AVG, after the new version came out, it was a huge downgrade in terms of speed.I switched to avast, and I haven't had a virus infection since...Even to test this theory, I'd be willing to uninstall avast, install kaspersky and run a full scan.
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