Canonical in hot water over Firefox EULA

By Justin Mann on September 15, 2008, 1:01 PM
Canonical and Ubuntu have gotten some backlash from their users prompting a recent update in which they are given the added burden of the Firefox EULA without their consent. The issue at hand is that Mozilla is requiring Canonical to include the EULA for their browser with all new releases if they continue to want to use the Firefox name. It apparently stems from a trademark issue, and doesn't actually restrict the user in any fashion. Of course, that's not why the users are upset – they are upset because it seems unnecessary.

The owner of the company seems to side with the users. He sees the inclusion of the EULA as mostly pointless. He does see why Mozilla is requiring the inclusion of the EULA, but calls the decision “unfortunate.”

For anyone else who uses Firefox, we're used to that – you agree to the EULA when you install the browser. At the moment Mozilla is not commenting on why they made this decision. It is worthy of note that Mozilla's interest here is not in protecting the browser itself or the code behind it, but merely their trademark – that is, the Firefox name.




User Comments: 3

Got something to say? Post a comment
Buckyg66 said:
So the Firefox shark has been jumped. Time for another "open source" browser me thinks.
fullmetalvegan said:
Nah, Firefox works fine, them wanting to protect their name doesn't mean I should cry and switch browser now. Or are OS and programs only cool until they have a EULA or trademark? =P
black_adder said:
Agree with Fullmetal here. Seems Firefox are just protecting their name.... Eitherway, I hardy think an extra *click's 'agree'* is something to be bothered about.
Load all comments...

Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.