Microsoft sheds light on Windows 7 features

By on October 28, 2008, 1:21 PM
Yesterday Microsoft lifted the curtains on its cloud computing platform, Windows Azure, at the PDC 2008 in Los Angeles. Today, itís all about Windows 7, with the company unveiling the upcoming operating system as it announced ambitious plans to have it on store shelves in little more than a year.

Windows 7 will replace the much-criticized Vista operating system, addressing some of the perceived weaknesses of its two-year-old predecessor that contributed to a largely negative reception. For example, the operating system is designed to boot and perform much faster, all while going easier on the hardware requirements Ė in fact, the company showed off the new OS running on a 1GHz netbook with 1GB of memory.


As for the user interface, it's very similar to Windows Vista, but there are enough changes to give it a very different feel: multi-touch and gestures will play an important role, it will be a lot less intrusive with fewer pop-ups and notifications, users can control what appears in their Task Bar and System Tray, among other usability improvements. Windows 7 will also include a significant amount of features that will tie in with Microsoft's Web services in Windows Live Essentials suite of applications.

ZDNet and Engadget have posted a more detailed look at the new features in Windows 7, which includes some that will networking a smoother experience, improved search, tighter device integration, and ďJump Lists.Ē All in all, Microsoft's next OS appears to be shaping up nicely, losing some of the irksome features in Vista while promising improved usability and performance all across the board. Hopefully, it will live up to expectations. (Image source: Neowin)




User Comments: 8

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windmill007 said:
Speed..Speed...Speed... If you actually make Windows 7 faster than Vista and as good or better than XP you may win me over. Now how about doing that to your office products. I am getting ready to uninstall 2007 and got back to 2003 Office as I can't stand the sluggishness...I have been bearing with it for months now and tried every trick in the book... Its just to bloated.
ddg4005 said:
As long as Microsoft makes real improvements to existing features and doesn't cut anything I think Windows 7 will sell well. It has the potential to sell at least as many units Windows XP and could enjoy a long life similar to XP also.
technict said:
Hi,windmill007 and ddg4005 made good points about Microsoft and their products.I agree with both of them and also, I have a say in this; To me, Microsoft needs to stop thinking about competition and "who sells big" and just try to concentrate on making their products top of the line. I hope they realize that they're one of the top major priorities in the world and most people need them but it seems like they're slacking off and they don't know how serious it is. Windows 7: from what I've heard, I guess this is a something that might put Microsoft back on the straight success road.BUUUTTT, We cant have hopes up for this, it may be a neat OS but can we reply on it.( remember that) Microsoft has a chance and I hope they don't mess it up or else that's it, people will just start switching to other types of OS that isn't the property of Microsoft. But I have to give props to Microsoft for bringing this out even though its to clean up vista's mess but its all good. So people, let's support Microsoft once again and see what they can offer, or and please please please, don't over do it with the pricing or else you're gonna be really hurting or than being successful.Thanks,*Tech~hack*
old101 said:
In my opinion the two greatest problems with Vista are: it is overpriced and thus not worth the money. Even in OEM configurations that are themselves often flawed. Secondly MS raised quality expectations it has not met, in any of it's too many Vista formats.From what I have heard so far of Windows 7 it has the features originally promised for Vista, or that should be there for the Vista price. It should come out in two versions only, Home and Office. As a replacement for Vista it should be priced as a minor correction, perhaps $29.95.If you think I am dreaming, you are probably right.
technict said:
[b]Originally posted by old101:[/b][quote]In my opinion the two greatest problems with Vista are: it is overpriced and thus not worth the money. Even in OEM configurations that are themselves often flawed. Secondly MS raised quality expectations it has not met, in any of it's too many Vista formats.From what I have heard so far of Windows 7 it has the features originally promised for Vista, or that should be there for the Vista price. It should come out in two versions only, Home and Office. As a replacement for Vista it should be priced as a minor correction, perhaps $29.95.If you think I am dreaming, you are probably right.[/quote]lol, wow well I'd be surprise if that's the price for it, but just don't expect to get so soon, because you already know that people will sweep them off the selves. I myself will be one of them getting it and testing it and see what it can offer. Come to think of it now, this OS is like a clone of vista's features which means...(if vista is trash and they gave windows 7 vista features also then we know there's gonna be a problem in between win. 7 or maybe i might be wrong;you never know but I guess we have to hope for the best.
Mugsy said:
When Vista came out, a client asked me if he should upgrade from XP. I told him "No. Vista is an OS with a two year shelf life". Not just because of the ridiculous overhead, reported incompatibilities that had to be fixed with a Service Pack, and massive hardware requirements to get the fanciest features, but mostly because it is STILL a 32bit OS at a time when 64bit processors and Terabyte sized hard drives are becoming common-place.The next Windows OS *has* to be able to address more than just 4GB of RAM. And the NTFS file-system... a rehash of HSFS from Windows-NT in 1996, maxing out at around 3 or 4 TB of addressable HD space (iirc) are on the verge of obsolescence.And, since Digital TV and widescreen monitors will be the new standard, I predict the next version of Windows will be dubbed "Panorama". :)
peas said:
Microsoft dropped the ball with Vista in a very bad way. In too many ways. Windows 7 was supposed to be another completely new OS, but when they realized that Vista was going to flop, Micro$oft scrambled and decided to do a deep-cleansing of Vista and re-release it as Windows 7. Google the topic if you don't believe that. In many ways Win7 will be equivalent to Vista SP4 lean & mean, kinda of like how users have created "Vista lite" releases with much of the garbage stripped out. Will Win7 help Micro$ recover from Vista? Probably, but the damage has already been done and Linux (particularly Ubuntu) has made significant inroads into the market. Closed-source OS's like Windows and MacOS have inherent sustainability weaknesses.Mugsy : Vista 64-bit already supports more than 4GB of memory addressing. Win7 will undoubtedly come in a 64-bit flavor as well.
Mugsy said:
[b]Originally posted by peas:[/b][quote]Mugsy : Vista 64-bit already supports more than 4GB of memory addressing. Win7 will undoubtedly come in a 64-bit flavor as well.[/quote]All 64bit OS's support >4GB, including the 64bit XP.64bit needs to be the new standard, not an obscure specialty OS.
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