Memory makers: SSDs to be mainstream in 2011

By on November 26, 2009, 1:29 PM
Various memory makers recently gathered in Taipei to explore the possibilities of establishing common standards for IT industries in China and Taiwan, and apparently, the group touched on SSD adoption. According to DigiTimes, the participants expect NAND flash prices to fall significantly in as chip suppliers transition to 20nm parts.

This would ultimately bring SSDs down to a more affordable level, but the attendees do not expect flash-based drives to achieve penetration in the PC market before 2011. In the meantime, representatives of China's industry are urging companies to develop and standardize SSD specifications to challenge core technologies currently controlled by major international vendors.

The two-day conference ended yesterday, and participants included top executives from Taiwan and China-based companies, such as A-Data Technology, Condel Technology, JMicron Technology, and Silicon Motion Technology. Mark Lai, compliance committee director for the Solid State Drive Alliance (SSDA), also attended.




User Comments: 40

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raybay said:

The costs per drive are remarkably low if all these outfits go into production as planned, and the competition will help keep them that way.

Of course we still have to wade through the defects that some manufactturers will put out as they go through th shortcuts instead of doing it right.

Deso said:

Western digital Caviar Black 2TB, beats the hell out of current ssd's as far as price for performance, I'd rather have that then a sdd anyday

Puiu Puiu said:

They say 2011, but i don't believe that it will be sooner than Q4 of 2011. Most likely 2012 will be the year in which SSD's will become mainstream.(hopefully)

Staff
Matthew Matthew, TechSpot Staff, said:

@Puiu: Any specific reason?

timljh said:

The last mechanical part of our computer finally will meets the end of its life soon ^_^ i wonder how fast the computer can be...

ColdPreacher said:

Nice to know. The standard disc hard drive is reaching an end to its ability. SSD's though fairly new have yet to mature and become the dominant source for holding data.

Fragrant Coit Fragrant Coit said:

Once the pricing becomes more affordable, they'll obviously become more "mainstream"!

manintech said:

I still prefer the traditional hard drives, they are cheaper, have larger capacity, and writing speed is faster

kaonis92 said:

It seems hard for makers to be able to lower prices much until 2012, but I certainly hope they will

vangrat said:

@ Manintech

Although this is true, traditional HDDs have been around for quite a while and although tthey are fast and cheap they also have a finite life span. I am looking forward to a future where data stored on a system can be kept forever. Not that the current SSDs will do this, but they are the precursor of that future...perhaps in years to come holographic memory will be that solution.

slh28 slh28, TechSpot Paladin, said:

It's about time I think - right now traditional HDs are approaching the end of their life as the only things they have to offer over SSDs are larger storage space, which is not really that important over 2TB (I can't imagine anyone having hundreds of HD movies they want to stash away) and price, which hopefully will not be a factor for SSDs in a couple of years.

bitMorph3r said:

all i can think about is the 24 SSD RAID0 setup .

saintbodhisatva said:

Ill hold off my purchase for SSDs for now then, will get me 500GB HDD for peanuts at the moment. This will really kick off probably by 2012, hopefully not the end of the world eh!

yorro said:

SSDs have better performance over HDDs because of no-spinups, no read/write head, phisical location is irrelevant, and less effect for fragmentations. Not the mention other stuff such as quite and less mechanical failure.

But HDDs have the best capacity which is more important.

wolfram wolfram, TechSpot Paladin, said:

The ideal setup would be a fast, sub $100 256GB SSD as boot drive, and a good HDD for storing purposes.

I still trust HDD's more than SSD's

AtK SpAdE AtK SpAdE, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

I have been looking for the end of the HDD for a long time. They really are the weak link of most computers. have something physically move day in and day out make them very vulnerable.

However I have personally had a SSD go bad in my netbook, and another in a friends. I welcome the death of the HDD but I want the SSD to get a bit more reliable over the long term before I make the switch. They are supposed to be a step forward not a step back.

Timonius Timonius said:

Sign me up for a new SSD when the Mayan Long count calender starts - by then the price and performance will probably be mainstream.

LazyNinja said:

I've been thinking of getting a low capacity SSD just for running my OS and few apps. I'd like to see my computer boot faster and be a bit more responsive. Doubt I could restrain myself from buying one until 2011 though . . .

lfg18 said:

Prices of SSD are falling, but they are still not affordable for most of us but it is just a matter of time since we all get our hands on one, with that and the new USB 3.0 pcs will become faster

levar said:

wow SSDs in PCs the costs for them will probably be the cost of when SSDs first came out. 2011 is just a year away that really isn't that far away... I <3 the computer industry!

Elohim83 Elohim83 said:

Can't wait for one of these puppies getting down to more reasonable prices, I've wanted one as a boot drive for a long time now but still I am not willing to dish out 120? for a 64GB SSD anytime soon.

Razerblade said:

These would have become more mainstream if the prices were lower. I cant wait until the prices of these fall so i can finally get one for my PC!

GoranGol GoranGol said:

I am also waiting for the price to go down. Maybe if i catch some action on 64GB SSD for OS drive

fref said:

I'm no expert in the field, so there is probably a very good reason for this, but how come they're talking about 20nm SSD chips when Intel itself is just starting to talk about 32nm CPUs? Why isn't Intel capable of producing 20nm chips, with all its money and resources?

harby said:

Well, thats good news right there. I'd love an SSD as my boot drive but I'm not paying silly amounts of monies for tiny capacity drives so yeah, gogo become mainstream already you little things!

buttus said:

I still don't see any benefit (apart from maybe notebook manufacturers) in using SSD vs disc storage. It is still way too costly and the capacities are considerably smaller then disc. I thought there was supposed to be a huge theoretical speed difference between the two mediums and yet anything I have seen has shown there to be little to no speed difference.

BlackIrish said:

fref said:

I'm no expert in the field, so there is probably a very good reason for this, but how come they're talking about 20nm SSD chips when Intel itself is just starting to talk about 32nm CPUs? Why isn't Intel capable of producing 20nm chips, with all its money and resources?

CPU and Memory manufacting is not even nearly the same thing (in terms of complexity and price). Btw, according to Intel, we'll see 22nm CPU's somewhere in 2012 I think, so that's far later then the memory chips will be coming.

rosemeadoil said:

slh28: which is not really that important over 2TB (I can't imagine anyone having hundreds of HD movies they want to stash away).

I can't help remembering that I thought I'd never fill a 20 mb

hard disc.

Guest said:

The main point of SSDs in the mainstream market are to accelerate operating systems and programs, not to deliver fast bulk storage. The performance pr cost for these applications (and databases) should be measured in IOPS/$, not bandwidth/$.

What i find most interesting of SSD is their combination of high IOPS/$ combined with really high IOPS/W.

Harddrives deliver around 1-5 IOPS/$ and 10-50 IOPS/W, while SSDs, like x25-M (80GB) can deliver 150-175 IOPS/$ read and 40-60 write, and roughly around 10.000 IOPS/W read and 3000-5000 IOPS/W write.

In addition, the accesstime of SSD are a couple of orders of magnitude faster than harddrives.

I believe we will se massive adoption of SSD as OS-drives throughout 2010, and the trend has already started, but has been halted a bit by low avalibility of x25-M gen2 and high prices for Indilinx based drives compared to Intel.

The tipping point for mass adoption will be when drives that can hold OS+progs (30-80GB depending on the user) with good consistent performance and no major drawbacks reaches 100-150$. I believe Kingston 40GB V (intel based with 5 channels used) will be able to satisfy the lower-capasity end of this, and deliver performance sufficient for HTPCs, netbooks, and "office computers", at cost of aquirement of 100$ or less.

claycc said:

I am running a 80gb SSD with W7 right now and I love the performance boost. I am really looking forward to seeing prices drop where I can pick up a SSD for my other rigs.

IvanAwfulitch IvanAwfulitch said:

I'm with claycc on that. SSDs going mainstream will be pretty sweet indeed. For me it's not about the money or when it comes how, it's how it performs and how fast it makes things and if it carries an affordable price-tag. As long as it gets mainstreamed, I don't care. Being able to load up Windows 7 on an SSD and getting from startup to desktop in 8 seconds will be fantastic. Gotta love technology.

GACrabill said:

I hope the SSD becomes mainstream before I need to upgrade to a newer laptop.

My wishlist would be that the non-budget laptops of 2012 should contain :

- an upgradable / replaceable SSD for OS and maybe some performance applications

- and a HDD for most all user files

- a partition on the HDD would back up the SSD and keep the backup in sync realtime (think raid, not that many writes to OS files)

- if the SSD fails or has errors, the HDD copy of files will be accessed automatically

- OS software command to disable SSD and run from HDD which allows simple upgrades to a faster or bigger SSD, and then an OS command to re-sync the SSD to the HDD and re-enable the SSD

- USB 3.0

This would probably require a new OS from Microsoft and I sure hope that they are working on it already.

LightHeart said:

Just waiting for the prices to become mainstream, like everyone else.

AbsolutGaloot said:

Ever since they've been released I've wanted an SSD main drive for its speed and performance, this is awesome that they're finally making it affordable. Now they just need to put USB 3.0 into production and everything will FLY

DarKSeeD DarKSeeD said:

If SSD will go mainstream in 2011 then pretty soon after that SATA will be(come) useless!?

topcoach said:

I bought an Intel X25-M, but I'm holding off from upgrading from Vista to Windows 7(64 bit) because of a known firmware bug. Intel promised the update will be out by end of Nov. It is now Nov 30th and still no firmware update. This is getting quite annoying.

Guest said:

The SNIA Solid State Storage Initiative (SSSI) site has a lot of useful information about SSD technology.

http://www.snia.org/forums/sssi

MVL said:

Would love to get an SSD, but a colleague has told me that a SSD should be re-formatted at least every 6 months, otherwise they get dreadfully slow... Not sure I believe this (defragmentation etc...)!

Mythbusters; busted or plausable?!?

topcoach said:

Good news. Intel today just released the long awaited SSD firmware update. Now I could update my X25-M SSD and upgrade to Windows 7.

claycc said:

Would love to get an SSD, but a colleague has told me that a SSD should be re-formatted at least every 6 months, otherwise they get dreadfully slow... Not sure I believe this (defragmentation etc...)!

Mythbusters; busted or plausable?!?

SSD performance does degrade over time. Windows 7 supports the TRIM command which should restore your SSD to pretty much factory condition and from I have read you can run it daily without reducing the life of your SSD. Maintaining a SSD requires a different approach than a normal hard drive. You don't want to defrag and there are some other Window tweaks that help with performance.

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