Patriot launches SandForce-based Inferno SSD range

By on May 14, 2010, 2:54 PM
Patriot today joined the many manufacturers who have recently launched SandForce-based solid-state drives, announcing the availability of its Inferno drives. Armed with the SF-1222 controller, the 2.5-inch SSDs boast maximum read and write rates of 285MB/s and 275MB/s, respectively. Those speeds are increasingly common, as Corsair, OCZ and Mushkin have models with similar, if not identical specs.


As you might expect, both Inferno models feature wear-leveling algorithms courtesy of SandForce DuraClass technology, and they're bundled with a 2.5-inch to 3.5-inch mount for desktop installation. The drives are currently shipping in 100GB and 200GB capacities via your standard e-tailers, including Newegg, who has them in stock for $369 and $679 quite a bit cheaper than OCZ's Vertex 2.

Of note, Patriot backs the Inferno line with a gracious five-year warranty, whereas most other companies offer three.




User Comments: 5

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Lurker101 said:

They might be quite a bit cheaper than OCZz range, but I still can't justify spending $369 on a meagre 100GB.

Guest said:

SF 1222 contoller or SF 1200 controller??

Staff
Matthew Matthew, TechSpot Staff, said:

[link]

Staff
Jesse Jesse said:

Everything I've read says that Intel's X25-M G2's are the best in the market, yet drives like this have much higher write speeds. Can anyone give me a brief explanation on what makes intel drives so good, or whether these new generations of Sandforce based SSD's are as good?

slh28 slh28, TechSpot Paladin, said:

prismatics said:

Everything I've read says that Intel's X25-M G2's are the best in the market, yet drives like this have much higher write speeds. Can anyone give me a brief explanation on what makes intel drives so good, or whether these new generations of Sandforce based SSD's are as good?

Intel's random read/writes are much better than most of the competition, which is the most important thing for OS use. The quoted speed is for sequential read/write which only really matters if you copy data to/from the drive all the time. It's kind of the same "headline number" as the number of megapixels for digital cameras, bigger does not always mean better.

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