Researchers: 1Tbps Ethernet by 2015, 100Tbps by 2020

By on October 28, 2010, 1:36 PM
Last week, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, announced the Terabit Optical Ethernet Center (TOEC), which will work on making the Internet a thousand times faster than it is today. TOEC's researchers are designing an optical fiber that would enable the next generation Ethernet, allowing it to handle 1 trillion bits (Terabit) per second by 2015 and 100Tbps by 2020. Agilent Technologies, Google, Intel, Rockwell Collins, and Verizon are all partnering with the center on its Ethernet Terabit networking effort.

Internet traffic requirements double every two years. With streaming video becoming more and more popular, not to mention the expectations for Internet traffic thanks to cloud computing and mobile phone use, we're not surprised. The solution lies in fiber optics, which is based on glass fibers (the size of human hair) that carry signals throughout the world by sending light over long distances. The efficiency breaks down when routers are used to convert the optical signals to electrical ones and then convert the signals back again for transmission. The capacity of fiber optics cables needs a boost to stay up to speed with our increasing Internet diet. Fiber optics revolutionized telephone communications and researchers are hoping it will do the same for Internet speed.

"We're going to need much faster networking to handle the explosion in Internet traffic and support new large-scale applications like cloud computing," Daniel Blumenthal, Director of TOEC, said in a statement. "Our goal is to make energy-saving technologies that will allow applications and the underlying networks to continue to scale as needed. You could think of it as greening future networks, and the systems that rely on those networks." To achieve Ethernet at 100Tbps, fundamental improvements in the underlying technologies will be required, he adds. "We're going to need dramatic breakthroughs across multiple disciplines, not only in the core Ethernet technologies but in Ethernet-based networking and in the engineering and measurement systems used to develop and test these new technologies."





User Comments: 68

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Elitassj4 said:

How the frack will you write 1Tbps on your HDD/SSD ?

princeton princeton said:

Elitassj4 said:

How the frack will you write 1Tbps on your HDD/SSD ?

By 2015 HDDs will be gone. And SSD's will probably start to become obsolete compared to the next great thing.

taea00 said:

At speeds like this you wouldn't need to write to a hard drive. I think with this kind of technology cloud computing would get a gigantic boost. Especially if they can offer speeds at competitive prices. These speeds, if they can do it in this time frame, would be a tremendous achievement. I'm kind of doubtful they can do it in the time frame they stated. Still I'd rather have a car that drives itself.

princeton princeton said:

taea00 said:

At speeds like this you wouldn't need to write to a hard drive. I think with this kind of technology cloud computing would get a gigantic boost. Especially if they can offer speeds at competitive prices. These speeds, if they can do it in this time frame, would be a tremendous achievement. I'm kind of doubtful they can do it in the time frame they stated. Still I'd rather have a car that drives itself.

The US barely has 4Mbps net in most areas. Maybe 1TBps for somewhere like south korea, but not for north america.

TeamworkGuy2 said:

I have trouble believing that in 5 years you could actually call your internet provide and order a 1 Tbps = (125 Gigabytes per second) internet connection.

It might be real, but I doubt that you will actually be able to use it as an end consumer.

The majority of Americans are still using ~4 Mbps = (500 Kilobytes per second) as of 2010, so to see that number x 250,000 sounds nearly impossible, although I might be forced to eat my words. Time will tell.

TomSEA TomSEA, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

5 or 10 years from now? Wake me when it's here. And when PC hardware can handle that level of transfer rate.

taea00 said:

princeton said:

The US barely has 4Mbps net in most areas. Maybe 1TBps for somewhere like south korea, but not for north america.

I'm not saying specifically a country. I'm saying in generality if they can achieved that kind of speed is amazing. I have no doubt it'd take years if not decades to roll out to countries, especially as you pointed out, the US.

TwiztidSef said:

It makes sense to develop this right now. With processors and SSD increasing in speed, by 2015 we should have computers capable of facilitating those speeds. I just hope they think to also increase the speed and standards of routers and switches. I believe that would be the bottleneck at the moment.

This might spawn some type of strange new internet based machine. With good enough specs to fully utilize the bandwidth, and with enough logic to get what you use the most. I doubt it though.

Neojt said:

Man can you imagine at what speed Spam will get to your email !! haha

If this comes true in game lag will be gone for ever

frodough said:

nice info but i think they seem to forget to include the prediction on the internet bill from your local telecom monopolistic giants: $175 by 2015, $400 by 2020.

Guest said:

These speeds would be for the internet backbone and ISP's not for home use. But how awsome would that be for home use!

Richy2k9 said:

hello ...

i'm sure when it will come, there will also be major improvements everywhere else & it will look relatively same as today's technology but with some great features, however i'm scared if all goes digital, on the cloud & going too fast, when will we human have time to disconnect from all of these... !?

here comes the time of the matrix .. .:P or skynet!

cheers!

SSaywell said:

If only I had that speed now, I wouldn't be posting I would be able to watch Lie To Me, instead I have a progress bar to entertain me.

mpribe said:

Can't wait! Although actual speed realized will probably be subject to end-user system limitations.

9Nails, TechSpot Paladin, said:

princeton said:

Elitassj4 said:

How the frack will you write 1Tbps on your HDD/SSD ?

By 2015 HDDs will be gone. And SSD's will probably start to become obsolete compared to the next great thing.

Potentially skipping past the SATA/SAS interface and putting your hard drive directly into the PCI-E slots, like with the Fusion IO cards, you'll see these kinds of numbers. I haven't looked up the numbers, but even still I doubt current IO cards have this sort of capacity on one card, and I question if a single motherboard has the bandwidth to allow transfer's this high. This solution would probably be found first in massive data centers with an entire rack of servers splitting up the traffic.

Guest said:

This is not really that big a deal, hasn't anybody heard of 'The Grid'? CERN, creators of the web, have created the NEXT internet, the Grid, and it's 10,000 times faster than the fastest broadband connection. It absolutely blows these 1tbps connections out of the water, and it already exists, it's not a pipedream.

The Grid is already operational in Europe but only for scientific/medical research purposes. We should have it in North America within a decade. The Grid is being powered by the Large Hadron Collider, CERN's massive particle accelerator.

kevin1212 said:

This tech might be around by then, but not for the average joe. It takes years before extreme becomes mainstream.

Guest said:

"The Grid is already operational in Europe but only for scientific/medical research purposes. We should have it in North America within a decade. The Grid is being powered by the Large Hadron Collider, CERN's massive particle accelerator. " - Guest

That is the funniest thing I have ever heard. I never knew the LHC was a powerplant xD

vangrat said:

I have to say this is all pie in the sky stuff. Yes the connection speeds for short distances will probably be that. However, for the majority of people this will be something that will not be seen for at least two decades. Australia is rolling out its National Broadband Network with a theoretical maximum limit of 1Gbps upon release. The average user will still only see half that, however.

On the greener grass side of things. Keep this technology pumping. Without advancement we WONT see these kinds of speeds, ever.

ColdFusion1990 ColdFusion1990 said:

It does seem a little far-fetched, but that would so unbelievably awesome if it were true. Imagine all that free media in seconds!

maestromasada said:

where wireless fit in all this? if we almightly human race put a massive wi-fi satelitte on orbit and then run a super-fiber cable from my house to the satelitte, I can surely broadcast wirelessly to the whole flipping planet! that wold be cool! I will let every human being know my passwd but my neighbord

stop day dreaming people, there are still thousands of 100Mbs devices around that will not be replace till they break (some of them lifetime cisco switches lifetime warranty!), we got to stand 1Gbs for the next 50 ods years

Zoner1501 Zoner1501 said:

We may have 1Tbps Ethernet by 2015, 100Tbps by 2020, but does that really matter when more and more Internet Providers are putting bandwidth caps on?

IAMTHESTIG said:

Guys this is for the internet backbone, not data lines that go through neighborhoods to give home users internet access. The backbone is whats slowing us down right now, it simply doesn't have enough bandwidth to support all of us on the internet watching videos at the same time. We don't really need a huge line to each person, it is completely unnecessary. Most people will not need anything over 10mbps, and a compressed 1080p video doesn't hit 10mbps constantly, so this speed would be more than enough to play a 1080p stream in real time.

ceejay949 said:

That is good news. I hope they will be able to achieve it on the mentioned years.

ChrisG683 said:

Awesome in theory, but sadly test speeds != consumer speeds. Unless the government makes a really big push to have America catch up in the global internet speeds by smacking these retarded corporations around, it ain't gonna happen anytime soon.

crzydave said:

forget cat5e try cat>9000

xcelofjkl said:

I wonder how fast it will come to PCs here in my country. Our fastest speeds here cant go faster than 3Mbps - 6Mbps.

pixelstuff pixelstuff said:

Currently the commonly used backbone technology tops out at about 0.786 Tbps, so a full 1 Tbps would be another step. Even if it was implemented in a LAN, it will be a while before a single computer could make use of that much bandwidth. However 100 computer talking to another 100 computer would. So the technology is definitely worth developing.

Here is the wikipedia entry on currently optical carrier speeds.

[link]

Considering that 10Gbps ethernet speeds haven't rapidly been adopted for local networks, I don't imagine 1Tbps speeds will suddenly become standard for anything except major back bones at least for a couple of decades after release.

Timonius Timonius said:

Very cool. But like they said all the other technology has to catch up. If you can build a 1000ft wide boat it still won't fit through a 100ft wide canal.

Guest said:

Australia is following the lead of Korea, and several other advanced asian/european countries, with the NBN -- essentially they are just replacing the century-old copper technology with fibre wires right to your door. if you want to upgrade the network from 100Mbps to 1Tbps or beyond, it should be a simple issue of replacing the old exchange switches and your old router with a newer model.

AFAIK there are no 'theoretical limits' on the fibre itself.

Guest said:

I do believe 1tbps is actually 1000g not 125g if I'm not mistaken.

SNGX1275 SNGX1275, TS Forces Special, said:

As others above have said, who cares about theoretical when the reality is everything sucks. My parents live 6 miles north of a town of 2000, their options are dialup or satellite, and no satellite isn't a real broadband option.

Nima304 said:

Untrue. The petabyte hard drive is expected to be released in 2012 at around $750.00, HDDs aren't going anywhere.

ruzveh said:

Its really mouth watering technology. Where can i get one? When to be precise

jazboy said:

I am not sure whether it would be possible till 2015 or not. Because there are still more than half of north american internet users who has maximum speed 4 Mbps. Lot of European country has more fast internet than us. But if it become possible then PC should be able to handle that speed. More over getting technology is not important but they should also start building infrastructure for this. As per one study, By this year end internet users will reach to 1 billion and this number are increasing very rapidly. If we keep this in mind then we should also start focusing on internet infrastructure keeping in mind the requirement and growth of internet users.

sMILEY4ever said:

Even though this sounds good, I think they're a bit too optimistic.

Skyphox said:

ChrisG683 said:

Awesome in theory, but sadly test speeds != consumer speeds. Unless the government makes a really big push to have America catch up in the global internet speeds by smacking these retarded corporations around, it ain't gonna happen anytime soon.

Feel sorry for us Brits, we are lagging behind even further!

Afenix said:

Well sounds to good to be true, but i don't mind, let the scientists do the work. For now i'm pretty happy with my 100mbps, but I wouldn't mind having 1tbps

BTW I doubt that hdd's will be replaced by ssd's, more likely the new hybrid disks will become more popular. I don't want to pay 40% more for 10s faster loading OS.

uttaradhaka said:

I agree. Its not whats possible in the lab, but its the technology that the government and the companies are willing to invest in thats the main thing.

I think that kind of speed is quite a bit far away still..

Recipe7 Recipe7 said:

1 Tbps is more than enough, I can't imagine anything larger for home use, unless the technology can keep up with it. Webcams for instance can't manage those type of speeds! Let's hope those top of the line webcams also go down in price when these speeds come out.

St1ckM4n St1ckM4n said:

Neojt said:

Man can you imagine at what speed Spam will get to your email !! haha

If this comes true in game lag will be gone for ever

Speed and ping are two totally different things.

Guest said:

First, WHERE THE HELL IS WIRELESS POWER????

DjKraid DjKraid said:

By 2015 HDDs will be gone. And SSD's will probably start to become obsolete compared to the next great thing.

And what would that be / look like..? 0_o

anguis said:

So Comcast's bandwidth cap could theoretically be reached in just two seconds (at 1Tbps). Would be amusing.

anguis said:

So Comcast's bandwidth cap could theoretically be reached in just two seconds (at 1Tbps). Would be amusing.

drasho said:

Well if they manage to do waht they say i might cry a little =) But even if it happens i wonder if the other part of the computer will be able to follow

fpsgamerJR62 said:

All these theoritical speeds are great to read and dream about but the sad reality is that a lot of internet users in countries around the world still get by with dial-up connections and so-called "broadband" connections which aren't broad in the first place. Here I am, using a laggy 1-Mbps connection to the internet. I'll be perfectly happy if the ISP ugrades me to 10 or 20 Mbps 5 years from now.

Storagebox said:

sadly here in Canada we only have 2 compagny ffor the internet 1 for cable other dsl and both got stupid low Bandwith limit so if u go faster you just brake it sooner and pay a ton in over

TuesdayExpress said:

<sigh> As we wait in the US for broadly available (and cheap) 100mbit connections.

The dream goes on...

peteyhawkins said:

That sounds very promising although 1Gbps ethernet still isn't taking advantage in regards of our broadband speeds.. I am one of the lucky few in the UK to have 40Mb fibre optic broadband, but most people are sitting well under 8Mb. The ethernet at 1Gbps is hardly in any devices, you still done get most home routers with gig lan and the broadband speedsdont need anything over 10Mbs

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