Major ISPs, recording industry unveil six-strike anti-piracy system

By on July 7, 2011, 3:49 PM

As accurately reported by CNET two weeks ago, several major US Web providers have effectively agreed to become the recording industry's personal Internet Stasi. Top ISPs, including Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Verizon will voluntarily collaborate with copyright groups such as the RIAA and MPAA to enforce a graduated response system intended to alert and eventually punish suspected copyright infringers.

Officially called the "Center for Copyright Information" (CCI), the organization is being established jointly by the film, music and television industries along with various ISPs. As part of The Center, ISPs will issue "Copyright Alerts" to notify alleged pirates of their unsavory behavior. Warnings may begin as a formal letter or email to inform accountholders of the unscrupulous activity (this has occurred for years, so it isn't anything new).

Failure to heed those warnings will initiate another tier of alerts as ISPs begin to nag suspected offenders with pop-ups or by redirecting specific pages. If the accountholder refuses to comply, ISPs will progress to a series of "Mitigation Measures," including bandwidth throttling, redirection to a landing page until the subscriber contacts the ISP (it's unclear if this will block access to all sites), or "other necessary measures."

Although this model is similar to France's three-strike system, it's not quite as harsh. France's HADOPI law requires ISPs to give alleged infringers two warnings about their conduct. The third time, they're blacklisted from all Internet providers, fined and face up to two years in prison. American ISPs will issue up to five alerts and the sixth step won't necessarily lead to the termination of your account or any legal repercussions.

"Consumers have a right to know if their broadband account is being used for illegal online content theft, or if their own online activity infringes on copyright rules...so that they can correct that activity," said James Assey, VP of the NTCA, an industry trade group. "We are confident that, once informed that content theft is taking place on their accounts, the great majority of broadband subscribers will take steps to stop it."

The problem with these systems is that you're essentially guilty until proven innocent -- and that's increasingly difficult to do if you actually are innocent. At least the old model generally required the recording industry to work through a (sometimes)-neutral legal mediator. Occasionally judges would dismiss requests to access your private data and ISPs were sometimes even reluctant to comply with such subpoenas.

Now ISPs are at the recording industry's disposal and the courts aren't involved. So what happens if you think you've been wrongly accused under the new system? You have to request an independent review, which will be performed by a "qualified, independent entity, separate from the Center for Copyright Information." As lovely as that sounds, the kicker here is that you have to pay a $35 "filing fee" to initiate the review.

Not only will this discourage individuals from contesting infringement accusations, but it will presumably help fund the CCI's operations (the cost of the framework is reportedly being split between the recording industry and ISPs). Naturally, you could always file a lawsuit, but that's a financial and logistical burden the average person simply won't commit to. We don't condone piracy, but this doesn't seem like the answer.




User Comments: 51

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lmike6453 said:

o no not my internets it's time to proxy it up

Guest said:

And the vpn business just became a lot more popular.

Mizzou Mizzou said:

The obvious question is why are the ISP's willing to pony up and pay for half of the infrastructure it will take to implement these policies. Future consideration for content deals for the providers that play ball perhaps?

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

And once, as people have mentioned, the hardcore will start using more intensive measures in order to disguise their activity, the RIAA and ISPs will introduce measures in which they will start actually looking at your traffic. They'll complain that pirates are now disguising their activity so it means they will have to search everyone's data in order to find the real criminals.

And the irony is that anyone seriously engaged in piracy is already using a lot of these measures, so all they will end up catching is some people who torrent and seed the latest songs, and give them the smackdown. Equivalent to busting some low level street dealer, while the kingpin rolls by.

bakape said:

Mizzou said:

The obvious question is why are the ISP's willing to pony up and pay for half of the infrastructure it will take to implement these policies. Future consideration for content deals for the providers that play ball perhaps?

Well, since roughly 20% of the ISPs' bandwidth is used up by torrenters and most torrents are illegal, this will most definitely result in profit.

Guest said:

.. are you sure the US is the ' Land of the Free' ??

PinothyJ said:

Guest said:

.. are you sure the US is the ' Land of the Free' ??

Sucks to be you kids...

Rasta211 said:

I support this is if they bring back unlimited data plans then.

ramonsterns said:

The poor starving masses of the entertainment industry.

Whatever will they do.

aj_the_kidd said:

gwailo247 said:

And the irony is that anyone seriously engaged in piracy is already using a lot of these measures, so all they will end up catching is some people who torrent and seed the latest songs, and give them the smackdown. Equivalent to busting some low level street dealer, while the kingpin rolls by.

Pretty much what i was thinking

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Guest said:

.. are you sure the US is the ' Land of the Free' ??

Well, let's keep in perspective we're talking about people who are doing something illegal, regardless of how we feel about the RIAA or piracy in general.

Yes, all and all we still have the freest country in the world, taking into account the huge heterogeneous population. I'm sure there will be some localized examples to the contrary, but you're usually dealing with either small or homogeneous populations, or both.

Guest said:

"Well, let's keep in perspective we're talking about people who are doing something illegal..."

No, we are talking about extrajudicial punishment which is simply illegal.

You can bet any smart ISP will only attempt to enforce this when conviction is guaranteed and absolutely worth ($) the effort.

Repeat after me.... "Class Action"

Guest said:

gwailo247 said:

"Yes, all and all we still have the freest country in the world...[sic]"

I learned that propaganda in the first grade, too. What makes you think it's true, other than the fact that you've had it drilled into your head a million times since you were 2 years old?

On second thought, maybe you're right. Right now there are millions of people free to look for jobs that don't exist, there are employers that are free not to consider the currently unemployed when hiring, there are banks that are free to foreclose on millions of homeowners who can't make their payments, and there are congressmen who are free to make proposals to effectively euthanize vast numbers of elderly be eliminating Medicare and pricing them out of the healthcare system, removing the safety net.

Not bad for the richest country in the world.

If that's what you call freedom, you can have it. Seems to me that Janis Joplin had it right. "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose."

Guest said:

I cannot stress enough the fact for any of you people who are with these ISP's that if there's a same price or even somewhat higher priced ISP alternative that does not enforce this six strike system then switch immediately and hit these bastards in pocket, because that's exactly where they want to hit you and make you pay what they want for the multitude of running series's, shows and movies that are basically audio/video junk that you watch once and forget. If they want to be taken seriously then offer this content at approximately 600% less then they are charging now.

Guest said:

Lol, anyone who uses torrents frequently on new releases deserve to be caught. Filehosting sites are the way to go because it isn't' as obvious as a torrent.

Guest said:

lol as with so many other "laws" in the US this screams for taking a huge dump on and laughing hard if someone try to enforce it on you.

Guest said:

May I suggest the nearest McDonald or Dunkin Wifi, sure you are gonna get fat but isnt it worth it?

Guest said:

All this will do is catch a few non computer savvy down loaders. Just use a proxy. Or take your lunch at a fast food place that has fast internet and download your content. If you squeeze a balloon it just pops out somewhere else.

treetops treetops said:

Hackers attack!

Darkshadoe Darkshadoe said:

Corporate vigilantism at it's finest.

aj_the_kidd said:

I hope it fails miserably simply because if its a "success" then the ISP's where i live will join in, then I wont be able to gloat

fpsgamerJR62 said:

There's an article on www.extremetech.com which deals on the same topic and also outlines some of the general procedures that the ISPs will follow once the system is in place. Based on the article that I read, this six-strike anti-piracy system is not as bad as it sounds and definitely much better than being dragged to court by the RIAA and the MPAA.

Richy2k9 said:

hello ...

sorry if i repeat myself here: "it has begun..." :P

still, with newer technologies now being put forward by ISPs, don't count on VPNs & whatever you think might spoof your ID on the net, unless you have the resources used by some high level hackers. Still there is no anonymity on the net, we tend to believe so because we keep hiding some facts.

this fight started long ago & most ISPs are going to go in pair with governments & big corporates, not to secure the web but sanction the wrongdoers.

it will soon look like a big open arena, with all the treasures placed in front of everyone, where you could admire (legal stream) & even enjoy, yet can't take away for then will commit an offence. The net will become an open system that will not prevent theft but severely sanction it.

today i don't see the reason about stealing music / movies or games, the work done by those artists / developers / creators are worth paying, even if sometimes look a bit expensive in the beginning but if you wait 3-6 months, there is always a price drop :P & music can be bought online track by track so no need to buy a full album & listen only to 1 song. movies are available quite soon on HD TV services or streaming & the price is right.

pirating will be a great risk, not worth it if you compare to legal alternative means & i believe in do it right the 1st time, don't do unto others what you don't want others do unto you & the harder the way to success, the most gratifying it is. when you need to buy something, you work out a budget, save a little or do some extra work & when you get it, you can be proud & show it off then enjoy it with clear conscious & no fear of legal issues.

new hardware for faster internet & better monitoring are being setup for the internet, like bringing the same vpn equipment to the public, getting involved with government & anti-piracy organisations, the ISPs seem to go against what we feel is our right by protecting the rights of others, the problem is, if we don't comply, the law will be amended & become harder & in the end we loose more (heard of a tax applied by some ISPs/governement over subscribers :S) ... so better stop when it's not too late than regret it later on ...

wishing us good luck for our big Internet adventure ...

cheers!

Guest said:

hello ...

sorry if i repeat myself here: "it has begun..." :P

still, with newer technologies now being put forward by ISPs, don't count on VPNs & whatever you think might spoof your ID on the net, unless you have the resources used by some high level hackers. Still there is no anonymity on the net, we tend to believe so because we keep hiding some facts.

this fight started long ago & most ISPs are going to go in pair with governments & big corporates, not to secure the web but sanction the wrongdoers.

it will soon look like a big open arena, with all the treasures placed in front of everyone, where you could admire (legal stream) & even enjoy, yet can't take away for then will commit an offence. The net will become an open system that will not prevent theft but severely sanction it.

today i don't see the reason about stealing music / movies or games, the work done by those artists / developers / creators are worth paying, even if sometimes look a bit expensive in the beginning but if you wait 3-6 months, there is always a price drop :P & music can be bought online track by track so no need to buy a full album & listen only to 1 song. movies are available quite soon on HD TV services or streaming & the price is right.

pirating will be a great risk, not worth it if you compare to legal alternative means & i believe in do it right the 1st time, don't do unto others what you don't want others do unto you & the harder the way to success, the most gratifying it is. when you need to buy something, you work out a budget, save a little or do some extra work & when you get it, you can be proud & show it off then enjoy it with clear conscious & no fear of legal issues.

new hardware for faster internet & better monitoring are being setup for the internet, like bringing the same vpn equipment to the public, getting involved with government & anti-piracy organisations, the ISPs seem to go against what we feel is our right by protecting the rights of others, the problem is, if we don't comply, the law will be amended & become harder & in the end we loose more (heard of a tax applied by some ISPs/governement over subscribers :S) ... so better stop when it's not too late than regret it later on ...

wishing us good luck for our big Internet adventure ...

cheers!

I don't want to wait 3-6 month to buy some crap cheaper from the sale bin.

I would want to see the look on your face if you bought Duke Nukem Forever for the full price.

fimbles fimbles said:

This is big buisness trying to throw its weight around. A small buisness will step in and fill the gap these measures will cause.

Big buisness = less customers

Small buisness = More customers

Until the day its written in to law i would not worry.

Saintnsinner said:

Guest said:

gwailo247 said:

"Yes, all and all we still have the freest country in the world...[sic]"

I learned that propaganda in the first grade, too. What makes you think it's true, other than the fact that you've had it drilled into your head a million times since you were 2 years old?

On second thought, maybe you're right. Right now there are millions of people free to look for jobs that don't exist, there are employers that are free not to consider the currently unemployed when hiring, there are banks that are free to foreclose on millions of homeowners who can't make their payments, and there are congressmen who are free to make proposals to effectively euthanize vast numbers of elderly be eliminating Medicare and pricing them out of the healthcare system, removing the safety net.

Not bad for the richest country in the world.

If that's what you call freedom, you can have it. Seems to me that Janis Joplin had it right. "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose."

Then move!

Richy2k9 said:

re - hello...

why is there always a 'Guest' who just come, read half of the lines & comment as if never understood even half of what's been read !!!

I wouldn't buy a Duke Nukem without proper review or trying it via legal means, i.e. demos!

I've bought / pre-ordered a few games in the past, only when i was sure of what i felt about, not what would be the outcome (ex, pre-orders en cours: Uncharted 3 & Diablo III). ..

If you really want something early, try to save for it & check reviews & seek advice before buying, for i doubt the authorities will make a difference between a full version demo from illegal source & an illegal download from a pirate.

what i really meant was that it's not worth taking such risk & i know things are being done, ISP, government side. I may even have a better insight than a lot of people for some reasons, so you'd better be prepared, that's all! It has begun ....

sorry but used to think like you then i realised i was tricking myself into believing into this. i just wish for everyone not agreeing to someday become a great artist, a game developer or software designer & that no one does anything to protect your work.

cheers!

Guest said:

So this guy Richy2k9 WTF is all I can say Demo's are not illegal they are free and there is no such a thing as a illegal source to download something for free o and btw we shouldnt be punished for downloading stuff when its 1. not stealing and 2. we didnt publish the stuff or others so you know we shouldnt be punished :)

If you really want something early, try to save for it & check reviews & seek advice before buying, for i doubt the authorities will make a difference between a full version demo from illegal source & an illegal download from a pirate.

So ye stop being a law enforcement fanboy!

Guest said:

The problem being that the U.S. courts declared that an IP address does not equal a person.

I could even prove this in a court room, by spoofing the IP and MAC address of the lawyer representing some recording studios, and illegally downloading files owned by different copyright holders.

He's either now a pirate, or an IP address is not a reliable way to identify someone by.

Richy2k9 said:

hello ...

pfff!

what did i say, OK repeat:

"why is there always a 'Guest' who just come, read half of the lines & comment as if never understood even half of what's been read !!!"

1st - nothing is really free !

2nd - i was referring to illegal sites & ...

by

"If you really want something early, try to save for it & check reviews & seek advice before buying, for i doubt the authorities will make a difference between a full version demo from illegal source & an illegal download from a pirate."

i meant :

following to the allusion of buying Duke Nukem full price & later regret it, some people tend to download full pirated version as a 'demo' for even if someone after playing a little or fully a pirated copy, that person would go buy full original version, it is not the way the authorities see it, it will go in the same junk bin of 'thieves' tracked by such new laws.

&

for your information, i'm not a law enforcement fanboy, but warning you, as you didn't get my posts right, let me state it clear for you, i work in a field where i see a lot of things go through & it's been some times since i started posted the "it has begun..." replies concerning the hacking scene & piracy, well if you don't like it, just don't read, if you want to comment, come with proper argument & please do remain mature else it doesn't hurt me but you!

moreover, no one here can't say that i wasn't right for the posts i made before concerning government's reaction to these two fields... go check 'em all if you have some time!

cheers!

foreverzero89 said:

Guest said:

.. are you sure the US is the ' Land of the Free' ??

not anymore i'm afraid.

foreverzero89 said:

saintnsinner said:

Guest said:

gwailo247 said:

"Yes, all and all we still have the freest country in the world...[sic]"

I learned that propaganda in the first grade, too. What makes you think it's true, other than the fact that you've had it drilled into your head a million times since you were 2 years old?

On second thought, maybe you're right. Right now there are millions of people free to look for jobs that don't exist, there are employers that are free not to consider the currently unemployed when hiring, there are banks that are free to foreclose on millions of homeowners who can't make their payments, and there are congressmen who are free to make proposals to effectively euthanize vast numbers of elderly be eliminating Medicare and pricing them out of the healthcare system, removing the safety net.

Not bad for the richest country in the world.

If that's what you call freedom, you can have it. Seems to me that Janis Joplin had it right. "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose."

Then move!

a old and invalid argument and i'm tired of hearing it.

paynetrain007 said:

The thing is all of you who are saying this is anti freedom... You have to realize that ISP's are private industry. You are using there products and they have rights to do whatever they please with them. There is nothing illegal that they are doing (as long as they don't search data on your local PC without your permission) If this is about Private industry standing up for there products and taking protecting there products into there own hands I'm all for it. If it has anything to do with government regulations innacting what ISP's have to do and watching user data then I'm against it. So otherwise what this looks like sounds good... But if it ever gets like France's version then I would be against it.

Staff
Per Hansson Per Hansson, TS Server Guru, said:

It actually scares me that none of this discussion so far has been about the legality of what the ISP's are doing.

They obviously can not just send out letters to anyone using the torrent system, since it has many many legitimate uses aswell (World of Warcraft to just mention one of the biggest systems that rely on it)

This means that what the ISP's are doing is "wiretapping" your Internet traffic and looking at exactly what you do, profiling for specific torrent trackers and whatnot.

A centralized search system like this sounds an awfully lot like Echelon, except here it is not government funded and owned but controlled by the private sector, without any actual legal right to monitor your data.

Unless some of the latest laws and whatnot in the US simply made it legal to monitor all your traffic.

If that is the case then I say you can keep your illusion "we still have the freest country in the world [sic]"

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Guest said:

gwailo247 said:

"Yes, all and all we still have the freest country in the world...[sic]"

I learned that propaganda in the first grade, too. What makes you think it's true, other than the fact that you've had it drilled into your head a million times since you were 2 years old?

Feel free to provide contrasting examples of countries that have more freedoms than the US. Freest is the superlative form of the word, which deals with relatives. For instance, you could barely top 30 IQ, but be considered the smartest in your family. So when you compare the US to most countries in the world, we are the most free.

You're complaining about economics, and while you make some points, what do they have to do with freedom?

I'm just sick and tired of extremely privileged Americans, even the ones who are out of work and have no health care, complaining about how we have no freedoms to do anything when in a lot of countries your post deriding the country would either be censored or you would be subject to some state persecution. One of the reasons a good chunk of the world is annoyed at us is that we complain at these imaginary problems (oh no, RIAA won't allow me to steal music) when the rest of the world has to suffer real problems.

So put your Xbox down, spend a few hours reading about freedom of speech and censorship worldwide, and then get back to me about how oppressed we are in America.

Guest said:

Actually, it was Kris Kristofferson that wrote that song...

MilwaukeeMike said:

Matt DeCarlo, was this supposed to be a news article or a heavily baised blog? Here's a link to the PC World story if anyone wants to read about it objectively. I'm glad your name is at the top so I know when to hit the back button now. [link]

I'm amazed at how upset people get when you take away their free stuff, even if it was never theirs to begin with and they're stealing to get it. It's disgusting.... guilty until proven innocent? You get an email - 4 times in a row! big freaking deal.

MilwaukeeMike said:

gwailo247 said:

So put your Xbox down, spend a few hours reading about freedom of speech and censorship worldwide, and then get back to me about how oppressed we are in America.

Well said. hate the govt? Try Somalia. Think we have no rights? Try the middle east, but only if you're a man. Want a 1st world example? Canada is free... free to pay 15% tax on everything they buy. How about Japan, where if you want to change jobs 10 years into your career you will start over at the bottom rung all over again with a starter's salary.

The fact that people complain about not getting free digital content is proof of how spoiled we are. No wonder google news is full of stories about the obesity rates being out of control...

Guest said:

I guess I'll have to go back to burning stuff to optical and handing it out to my friends.

ramonsterns said:

milwaukeemike said:

spoiled we are.

You're so used to being alive you should be happy with being dead.

veLa veLa said:

gwailo247 said:

Guest said:

.. are you sure the US is the ' Land of the Free' ??

Well, let's keep in perspective we're talking about people who are doing something illegal, regardless of how we feel about the RIAA or piracy in general.

Yes, all and all we still have the freest country in the world, taking into account the huge heterogeneous population. I'm sure there will be some localized examples to the contrary, but you're usually dealing with either small or homogeneous populations, or both.

The USA is not the freest country in the world lol. I bet you've never even visited a better country, which there are plenty of.

Guest said:

re - hello...

why is there always a 'Guest' who just come, read half of the lines & comment as if never understood even half of what's been read !!!

I wouldn't buy a Duke Nukem without proper review or trying it via legal means, i.e. demos!

I've bought / pre-ordered a few games in the past, only when i was sure of what i felt about, not what would be the outcome (ex, pre-orders en cours: Uncharted 3 & Diablo III). ..

If you really want something early, try to save for it & check reviews & seek advice before buying, for i doubt the authorities will make a difference between a full version demo from illegal source & an illegal download from a pirate.

what i really meant was that it's not worth taking such risk & i know things are being done, ISP, government side. I may even have a better insight than a lot of people for some reasons, so you'd better be prepared, that's all! It has begun ....

sorry but used to think like you then i realised i was tricking myself into believing into this. i just wish for everyone not agreeing to someday become a great artist, a game developer or software designer & that no one does anything to protect your work.

cheers!

Listen Mr. Pavlik Morozov

I am no anarchist, thief or cheapskate and can understand

that someone who has worked to create IP would want some

return for it and not see it pirated. If I download an e-book (Say programming/IT)

and find that the book is well set put together I will buy it from Amazon

to support the Author, on the other hand if it's rubbish and I can get better material off MSDN as roughly 60% tend to fall in that category I will not buy these books and avoid

spending a good deal of money.

it's also clear as daylight to me that media be it music, movies or games are

substantially overpriced in respect to their production costs and frequency of release

and they should be sold at what the market is willing to pay, not what they feel we should pay.

I calculated that if I were to pay what the networks\studios are asking for watching or owning

every episode of some never ending TV series's I tend to watch every now and then

,comic book hero movies, drama and action flicks etc. it would leave me damn near broke.

The solution to piracy is a cheap subscription service and agreement between studios/artists

to provide all their content through these major subscription channels, all sharing one membership/identity token. Say $15 a month for everything everyone releases to be available for streaming in HD sounds fair and maybe latest in-demand movies for an additional on-top, one time fee of 70c - $1.30, where this movie will be included into the price of the $15 subscription after the initial 4-6 weeks or so from the date of release. Otherwise trying to charge $20-$35 for new DVD's, downloads or albums is a greedy model that will see the majority of people turn to piracy. Sell more for less, not less for more!

The big corps a re f...ng dreaming! if they think the majority of the population

have enough to pay for all their sh*t separately. Oh yeah, here you you go Mr. Apple

$24.95 for your iCloud music services this month, I did want to listen to more music

but used up my credits :(, here you go Mr. Cable TV/HBO provider $45 for you, here you go Mr. NetFlix $18 for you this month. Not to mention all the broadband and connectivity bills associated with accessing these services. Here you go Mr. Cinema $15 - $30 for you. But wait I did want to have some of these permanently on my hard drive looks like I am gonna buy the DVD\Download too now.

Guest said:

OKay I usually don't post but had to make a quick comment, the United States is not hardly the richest country in the world. Have you considered our economy or the fact our country is in debt?

Guest said:

"Repeat after me.... "Class Action"

Good luck with that. There was a supreme court decision a couple months ago that pretty much says customers will have to agree to arbitration. A lot of ISPs changed their terms to include that if it wasn't already in there. I know it's now in AT&Ts agreement.

Richy2k9 said:

Guest said:

>>SNIP<<

>>SNIP<<

Listen Mr. Pavlik Morozov

I am no anarchist, thief or cheapskate and can understand

that someone who has worked to create IP would want some

return for it and not see it pirated. If I download an e-book (Say programming/IT)

and find that the book is well set put together I will buy it from Amazon

to support the Author, on the other hand if it's rubbish and I can get better material off MSDN as roughly 60% tend to fall in that category I will not buy these books and avoid

spending a good deal of money.

it's also clear as daylight to me that media be it music, movies or games are

substantially overpriced in respect to their production costs and frequency of release

and they should be sold at what the market is willing to pay, not what they feel we should pay.

I calculated that if I were to pay what the networks\studios are asking for watching or owning

every episode of some never ending TV series's I tend to watch every now and then

,comic book hero movies, drama and action flicks etc. it would leave me damn near broke.

The solution to piracy is a cheap subscription service and agreement between studios/artists

to provide all their content through these major subscription channels, all sharing one membership/identity token. Say $15 a month for everything everyone releases to be available for streaming in HD sounds fair and maybe latest in-demand movies for an additional on-top, one time fee of 70c - $1.30, where this movie will be included into the price of the $15 subscription after the initial 4-6 weeks or so from the date of release. Otherwise trying to charge $20-$35 for new DVD's, downloads or albums is a greedy model that will see the majority of people turn to piracy. Sell more for less, not less for more!

The big corps a re f...ng dreaming! if they think the majority of the population

have enough to pay for all their sh*t separately. Oh yeah, here you you go Mr. Apple

$24.95 for your iCloud music services this month, I did want to listen to more music

but used up my credits , here you go Mr. Cable TV/HBO provider $45 for you, here you go Mr. NetFlix $18 for you this month. Not to mention all the broadband and connectivity bills associated with accessing these services. Here you go Mr. Cinema $15 - $30 for you. But wait I did want to have some of these permanently on my hard drive looks like I am gonna buy the DVD\Download too now.

hello ...

I don't know if you are same guest i've replied to, but you too seem not to see the core of my message, maybe i don't express myself clearly, sorry for that my main language being much more French based.

I'm no activist or loyalist to some causes, but i know what's being cooked & only saying that it doesn't seem worth it to be tagged & put in same basket as other pirates when you do things like what you said, 'full version demo' ....to the authorities would be guilty of piracy & that's it.

I still don't understand why some would take such risk download a 'bad' movie or quoting you: "some never ending TV series's I tend to watch every now and then" ...

if it's bad, it's bad! hackers & pirates have been giving governments reasons to support those big corps & ISPs in such crusade & now with legal support it will be worst for even passive 'illegal downloaders'.

I agree with the propositions you made & the bad business models already in place, I don't even have netflix / hulu & youtube movies from my region, i have only SAT TV (French) & buying DVDs/Blu-rays online ... so yes piracy is high in MU. I'm one of the rare not going that way anymore. There are alternatives, free & legal or cheap & accessible, yet people need to look for them.

Like you said, if not good to buy a book, you look for alternative from MSDN library, when you are a student, you do have a lot of free legal alternatives, when you buy some equipments you do get the proper supporting documents & software where needed. Freewares, good ones exist.

The 'pirates' i've met don't do so for the price but because it's easy, even rich landlords do so, working in a field i can see how the near future will be technologically (ISP wise), i'm sure things will change soon, the process has begun & no one can do anything, except comply or fight by using alternate legal routes. It's easier to fight when you support each other on legal grounds.

Now if you want to compare me with some 'martyrs' seek someone having no controversy in their background story, i tend to exaggerate in my words but my feeling is simple: get the most out of everything by losing less & if i have to be on par with law & respect other people, it's easier ...

have a nice week-end,

cheers!

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

veLa said:

The USA is not the freest country in the world lol. I bet you've never even visited a better country, which there are plenty of.

And your example is what? So far nobody has yet to identify this magical country of absolute freedom. Vanuatu?

Benny26 Benny26, TechSpot Paladin, said:

And your example is what? So far nobody has yet to identify this magical country of absolute freedom. Vanuatu?

As an Englishman, It pains me to say that Scotland wouldn't be a bad example:

Free university tuition fees (England doesn't get, yet subsidized by England)

Free medical prescriptions (England doesn't get, yet subsidized by England)

Free care for the elderly (England doesn't get, yet subsidized by England)

Free overall healthcare (The NHS)

Very generous welfare system.

Generous legal aid system

...It's a kick in the nuts for the rest of the UK...more so with the free university tuition fees and Scotland having some of the best universitys in the UK.

Staff
Per Hansson Per Hansson, TS Server Guru, said:

As an Englishman, It pains me to say that Scotland wouldn't be a bad example:

Free university tuition fees (England doesn't get, yet subsidized by England)

Free medical prescriptions (England doesn't get, yet subsidized by England)

Free care for the elderly (England doesn't get, yet subsidized by England)

Free overall healthcare (The NHS)

Very generous welfare system.

Generous legal aid system

...It's a kick in the nuts for the rest of the UK...more so with the free university tuition fees and Scotland having some of the best universitys in the UK.

Sweden is the same, but don't call it "free" because it is not.

It's paid for by taxes

That still beats the system in the US (IMO) since if you get in trouble or don't have the correct insurance you are pretty much going to get bankrupted (or just left behind, unless you have some really good friends)

And btw, most western European countries are the same in this regard

Benny26 Benny26, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Sweden is the same, but don't call it "free" because it is not.

It's paid for by taxes

That still beats the system in the US (IMO) since if you get in trouble or don't have the correct insurance you are pretty much going to get bankrupted (or just left behind, unless you have some really good friends)

And btw, most western European countries are the same in this regard

However, Scotland doesn't fully fund itself with regard to taxes, most of its money comes from the UK government, and the four countries of the UK get treated far different from each other (like the top 3 i quoted we don't get in England). This is why Scotland, in my opinion, is set apart from other countries. Also, "free" is a bracket that people may or may not fall in depending on weather you're on benefits or not, and seen as alot of people are on benefits in Scotland (just like the whole UK actually), they really do get away with some free things.

I think i read somewhere that Sweden was the 2nd most "wanted to live" countries behind Finland...I'm not surprised, I like Sweden.

grumpiman said:

Benny26 said:

And your example is what? So far nobody has yet to identify this magical country of absolute freedom. Vanuatu?

As an Englishman, It pains me to say that Scotland wouldn't be a bad example:

Free university tuition fees (England doesn't get, yet subsidized by England)

Free medical prescriptions (England doesn't get, yet subsidized by England)

Free care for the elderly (England doesn't get, yet subsidized by England)

Free overall healthcare (The NHS)

Very generous welfare system.

Generous legal aid system

...It's a kick in the nuts for the rest of the UK...more so with the free university tuition fees and Scotland having some of the best universitys in the UK.

...and don't forget one of the lowest life expectancies in a non-third world country.

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