Apple sidesteps HP, tops mobile PC shipments (if you count the iPad)

By on August 19, 2011, 7:00 AM

Apple overtook HP to become the top mobile PC vendor worldwide in the second quarter of 2011, according to stats released by DisplaySearch. The report, which includes figures for both notebooks and tablets, claims that Apple represented 21.1% of the second quarter's mobile PC shipments. Cupertino shipped some 13.6 million mobile machines (nearly 80% or 10.7 million of which were iPads), marking an increase of 107% on-year.

HP trailed in second representing 15% of the world's mobile PC shipments with 9.7 million units, while Dell and Acer clashed over third place. The former outfit won by about 500,000 units, having shipped 7.5 million mobile machines, accounting for 11.6% of the pie, and the latter moved 7 million systems with a 10.9% share. Lenovo occupied the bottom of the top five chart with about 7.5% of shipments, which equates to 4.8 million systems.

Overall, 64.4 million mobile computers were shipped in the second quarter, up 10% from the previous quarter and 28% from the year-ago period. Although the mobile segment remains fairly strong, that's mostly attributed to the ongoing popularity of tablets. Few companies witnessed strong growth in laptop shipments with Samsung and Dell being the exceptions. Samsung witnessed a 44% boost on-year, while Dell's shipments grew 27%.

Notebook shipments have been stagnant with a 2% sequential decline and a 2% on-year increase. By comparison, tablets grew 70% and 400% in the same timeframe. It's no secret that tablets have altered the mobile computing landscape and some of the world's largest PC makers are struggling to ride the waves. Acer recently underwent significant corporate restructuring to focus on such devices, while HP has simply thrown in the towel.

Based on iSuppli's predictions, the world will continue to shift away from full-fledged PCs in favor of accessing the Internet through Web-connected electronics such as TVs and game consoles as well as companion devices like tablets. By 2015, iSuppli believes shipments of Web-ready consumer electronics will skyrocket to 780.8 million from 161 million in 2010, and more than 300 million of those devices will be tablets such as the iPad.




User Comments: 11

Got something to say? Post a comment
Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Well, not a massive surprise...

yRaz yRaz said:

The iPad doesn't count as PC, It doesn't even have the functionality we expect of a laptop or PC. It's not just the iPad either, it's tablets in general. Tablets are just the rich mans toy, nothing more.

Guest said:

Agree, iPad shouldn't count as PC

Panda218 Panda218 said:

yRaz said:

The iPad doesn't count as PC, It doesn't even have the functionality we expect of a laptop or PC. It's not just the iPad either, it's tablets in general. Tablets are just the rich mans toy, nothing more.

Yeah I'd have to agree.

JudaZ said:

Then Casio and Texas instruments sells more PC's then Apple ... if you count their calculators.

an iPad is not a PC ... it's a tablet ..but worse

Guest said:

I'm really curious to see how the tablet market evolves.

I bought a transformer. So far it sits on my desk charging.

I really haven't found a use for it.

I have a laptop and a netbook.

If I need something to take with me it is usually the netbook.

I could be wrong, but I don't see the tablet being a PC killer.

I thought that HP should have lined up VARs and OEMS and offered big discounts,

which would allow them to bundle tablet, apps and devices for businesses.

The PC took off with MSDOS as a basic OS and then VARs and OEMS

created business solutions until the Internet and WWW created bigger consumer demand.

Relic Relic, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

I agree with most here and don't consider iPads PC's, as when I hear that term I think more of traditional personal computing devices with real productivity value that I don't see in current tablets. Especially since most tablets are mainly focused on consumption.

Guest said:

I could be wrong, but I don't see the tablet being a PC killer.

Indeed, at least not for a very long time until we can cram all the power and productivity of a traditional PC into a tablet like device.

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

If you can't beat em, rewrite the parameters of the game.

All the media are writing about how Apple is becoming a top PC seller, yet they still somehow stay below 10% market share.

Apple is still a resounding loser in that segment of the market, but if you move the data around, makes it sound like the winner.

The only number meaningful to the consumer, not the business analyst or fanboy, is OS market share. Out of the people who buy assembled PCs, none of them has stayed with a single manufacturer. They move between Dells, HPs, and (Compaqs, Gateway, E-machines back in the day), because they know that when they turn on their monitor, they will have the same OS on the desktop.

Only Apple consumers go out and buy Apple. PC consumers look for Windows first, PC brand second. To me, as a consumer, all those brands mentioned are the same thing. They're all Windows products. When I was laptop shopping, I wasn't out to buy an HP or a Sony, I was out to buy a Windows laptop. I settled on a Lenovo, but I had my eyes on an Acer and an ASUS as well.

Apple fanboys seem to think that this brand adherence somehow translates to HP and Dell when it does not. You don't have HP fanboys or Dell fanboys, you have Windows fanboys. If people are so inclined to care about a statistic, they're going to care about Windows aggregate sales, not how many units a given company sold, cause their computers are interchangable, again, it's the OS that counts.

Guest said:

Well actually some tablets have a lot of functionality just not the Ipad. The Ipad is merely a giant ipod touch. I can't believe it doesn't even have a single usb port. HP made ten times better tablets they just don't have advertisers to match apple's. Apple should only be known for one thing, genius advertising.

lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said:

gwailo247 said:

If you can't beat em, rewrite the parameters of the game.

All the media are writing about how Apple is becoming a top PC seller, yet they still somehow stay below 10% market share.

Apple is still a resounding loser in that segment of the market, but if you move the data around, makes it sound like the winner.

The only number meaningful to the consumer, not the business analyst or fanboy, is OS market share. Out of the people who buy assembled PCs, none of them has stayed with a single manufacturer. They move between Dells, HPs, and (Compaqs, Gateway, E-machines back in the day), because they know that when they turn on their monitor, they will have the same OS on the desktop.

Only Apple consumers go out and buy Apple. PC consumers look for Windows first, PC brand second. To me, as a consumer, all those brands mentioned are the same thing. They're all Windows products. When I was laptop shopping, I wasn't out to buy an HP or a Sony, I was out to buy a Windows laptop. I settled on a Lenovo, but I had my eyes on an Acer and an ASUS as well.

Apple fanboys seem to think that this brand adherence somehow translates to HP and Dell when it does not. You don't have HP fanboys or Dell fanboys, you have Windows fanboys. If people are so inclined to care about a statistic, they're going to care about Windows aggregate sales, not how many units a given company sold, cause their computers are interchangable, again, it's the OS that counts.

Thank you.

YoYoMa said:

We really shouldn't be counting iPads.

Load all comments...

Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.