OCZ Octane SSD packs new Indilinx controller, 1TB capacity

By on October 20, 2011, 11:00 AM

OCZ's first solid-state drives based on the Indilinx Everest platform have been officially revealed. The new Octane series includes two models: one with a SATA 3.0 (6Gbps) interface and synchronous NAND flash delivering read speeds up to 570 MB/s and writes of 400 MB/s with up to 45,000 read IOPS using 4K blocks, while a SATA 2.0 (3Gbps) variant with asynchronous NAND can reach 275MB/s and 265MB/s read and write speeds with up to 30,000 4K random read IOPS.

But performance is just a small part of the overall Octane picture. The drives feature Indilinx's NDurance technology, which OCZ says increases the life span of NAND flash memory by as much as 2 times, from the 3,000-5,000 PE write cycles currently seen on 20nm-class NAND drives back to the 6,000-10,000 range we saw with 30nm-class NAND.

Moreover OCZ is touting access times as low as 0.06ms, a ‘Fast Boot’ technology that will supposedly deliver 50% speedier boot times compared to existing SSDs, and no data compression limitations as in SandForce-equipped models, so users can expect better performance with certain operations with media files and the like.

They'll also feature up to 512MB of DRAM cache, AES encryption, TRIM and NCQ support. In terms of storage capacity, the Octane line will include 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, and 1TB drives. Exact prices haven’t been announced just yet but we do know OCZ is aiming for a $1.10 to 1.30/GB price point, which means a 128GB model would sell for around $166.

OCZ agreed to purchase South Korea-based NAND flash controller maker Indilinx for $32 million back in March. The Octane series is their first SSD line to use the newly acquired company's controller technology since then, but OCZ has previously said they will continue to rely on third-party partners for some of their products.




User Comments: 14

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Mizzou Mizzou said:

This is OCZ's first dividend from the Indilinx acquisition. Hopefully the performance numbers are for real along with the $166 price tag for the 128GB drive. It's about time for SSD manufacturers to start lowering their prices to make the solid state disk more of a mainstream item.

Cota Cota said:

I wonder if prices would go down if they used lower capacity chips and make 3.5" drives, also if the speed went lower i wouldn't mind, something like a 1TB 3.5" drive that gives 100MB/S speeds would be welcomes by a lot of people.

And by a lot of people i mean the people who know that raw speeds isn't all, its also about not having those HDD readers going crazy when you are multitasking big loads.

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

cota said:

I wonder if prices would go down if they used lower capacity chips and make 3.5" drives, also if the speed went lower i wouldn't mind, something like a 1TB 3.5" drive that gives 100MB/S speeds would be welcomes by a lot of people.

And by a lot of people i mean the people who know that raw speeds isn't all, its also about not having those HDD readers going crazy when you are multitasking big loads.

I've always wondered that as well? I don't mind the drive being in a 3.5" size and surely if the die size doesn't need to be as small it would cost less and therefore lower prices?

Staff
Per Hansson Per Hansson, TS Server Guru, said:

burty117 said:

I've always wondered that as well? I don't mind the drive being in a 3.5" size and surely if the die size doesn't need to be as small it would cost less and therefore lower prices?

Nope, price is related to the wafer size, which is directly proportional to the die size.

A 300mm wafer can only fit so many dies with a physical size of Xmm and that therefore controls the cost...

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Per Hansson said:

burty117 said:

I've always wondered that as well? I don't mind the drive being in a 3.5" size and surely if the die size doesn't need to be as small it would cost less and therefore lower prices?

Nope, price is related to the wafer size, which is directly proportional to the die size.

A 300mm wafer can only fit so many dies with a physical size of Xmm and that therefore controls the cost...

Dang it! It was worth a try

Lionvibez said:

Per Hansson said:

burty117 said:

I've always wondered that as well? I don't mind the drive being in a 3.5" size and surely if the die size doesn't need to be as small it would cost less and therefore lower prices?

Nope, price is related to the wafer size, which is directly proportional to the die size.

A 300mm wafer can only fit so many dies with a physical size of Xmm and that therefore controls the cost...

how dare you bring logic into this :P

Guest said:

So how much would one of these beauties go for?

SammyJames said:

Guest said:

So how much would one of these beauties go for?

Well, if a 128 GB drive costs $166, then multiply that x 8 -- and you'll get roughly $1,200 for a 1TB drive. All things considered, that isn't BAD -- it's just way-more expensive than what you'd pay for a similiar-capacity HDD. However, I could easily see myself buying a 128GB drive -- even TWO of them -- and I would feel good about the purchase. Right now, many 64 GB SSDs are going for as much as $150. So this is a step in the right direction.

Give it about six months, and almost everyone will be either buying an SSD or strongly considering it.

SammyJames said:

I was going to do some research on this, to see how prices had changed on HDDs since, say, 2005 or 2006. But the data, though probably out there, is scant. The point is that eventually, when everyone and his dog owns an SSD, we'll be able to buy them just as we do with HDDs today. And someday, HDDs will probably cease to be manufactured anymore.

Just like floppy disks -- er, I mean, uh...

Zecias said:

why buy an SSD for $166 when you can get it for $99

[link]

SSDs are getting pretty cheap, just a few months ago they started breaking the $1 for 1GB barrier.

SammyJames said:

zecias said:

why buy an SSD for $166 when you can get it for $99

[link]

SSDs are getting pretty cheap, just a few months ago they started breaking the $1 for 1GB barrier.

Ha. I know that this will seem EXTREMELY geeky, but let's face it -- sure, $99 sounds like a great deal for a 120GB SSD. However, the link that you point to shows a SATA II drive -- whereas the fastest drives are now SATA III. It makes a difference -- we're talking about ~3 Gb/s versus ~6 Gb/s. We're talking close to twice the speed, with fewer memory bottlenecks, et cetera.

Two seemingly-similar SSDs can have completely different specifications. Read the fine print, and don't just buy something because it seems "cheap and fast." Don't forget about the controller too -- SandForce is considered to be very good, but apparently even OCZ may be on the verge of making that technology obsolete.

Cota Cota said:

Per Hansson said:

burty117 said:

I've always wondered that as well? I don't mind the drive being in a 3.5" size and surely if the die size doesn't need to be as small it would cost less and therefore lower prices?

Nope, price is related to the wafer size, which is directly proportional to the die size.

A 300mm wafer can only fit so many dies with a physical size of Xmm and that therefore controls the cost...

And how about overproduction's?, i remember watching those 1GB chips going for less than 65 cents U.S. dollars (or am i?, to much candy), also the hi capacity chips tend to be more "expensive" to produce. The market is such a singularity.

Guest said:

It really is amazing how far OCZ has come in 10 years. They went from being a reseller screwing end users on memory, motherboards and cpus to buying big memory companies for multi-millions. Everyone seems to have forgotten their past though.

Guest said:

Rebates?......really? You have a better chance of being attacked by a bear and getting hit by a bus In the same day than ever seeing you rebate from most place's.

But If your happy with the pre-rebate price go for It, the 60GB sata ll for $59(pre-rebate) looks like a good deal.

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