Intel sweeps record earnings into its coffers, anticipates 2012

By on January 20, 2012, 7:30 AM

Say what you will about us being in a post-PC era, but Intel's pocketbook sure doesn't seem to be feeling it. The Santa Clara-based chipmaker releases its financial breakdown for the full year of 2011 with record revenue of $54 billion, up 24% from $43.6 billion in the year prior, while net income rose 13% on-year to $12.9 billion. The company's fourth quarter results were also respectable with $13.9 billion in revenue on profit of $3.4 billion, up 21% and 6% from the same period in 2010.

Intel's PC Client Group raked in a healthy portion of that cash with revenue of $35.4 billion for the full year and $9 billion for the fourth quarter, up 17% for both durations. The company's Data Center Group also felt a 17% boost through the year, marking revenue of $10.1 billion. The Other Intel Architecture Group, which contains the outfit's embedded and mobile-oriented divisions, had revenue of $5 billion, up 64%. Revenue from Atom microprocessors and chipsets fell 25% to $1.2 billion.

Intel is looking forward to another fruitful year with the launch of its Ivy Bridge processing platform, the continued rollout of Ultrabooks, as well as the introduction of Medfield-based smartphones and tablets. Ivy Bridge is due to launch sometime in the spring and there are reportedly 70 Ultrabook designs being developed by partners. Two handsets by Lenovo and Motorola are confirmed to be in the pipeline with the latter company planning to have its product on shelves by mid to late 2012.

Intel expects first quarter revenue to reach some $12.8 billion with a 63% gross margin and $4.4 billion allocated to research and development as well as mergers and acquisitions. "With outstanding execution the company performed superbly, growing revenue by more than $10 billion and eclipsing all annual revenue and earnings records. With a tremendous product and technology pipeline for 2012, we're excited about the global growth opportunities," said Intel CEO Paul Otellini (PDF).




User Comments: 7

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ddg4005 ddg4005 said:

Given the success of Sandy Bridge processors I'm not surprised by this. Whatever questionable business practices Intel has engaged in there's no denying their engineering prowess when it comes to CPUs and chipsets.

Scshadow said:

ddg4005 said:

Given the success of Sandy Bridge processors I'm not surprised by this. Whatever questionable business practices Intel has engaged in there's no denying their engineering prowess when it comes to CPUs and chipsets.

When I think about businesses with questionable business practices, Intel really doesn't seem to come to my mind high up on my list. Should it?

ddg4005 ddg4005 said:

Scshadow said:

ddg4005 said:

Given the success of Sandy Bridge processors I'm not surprised by this. Whatever questionable business practices Intel has engaged in there's no denying their engineering prowess when it comes to CPUs and chipsets.

When I think about businesses with questionable business practices, Intel really doesn't seem to come to my mind high up on my list. Should it?

Intel has engaged in questionable business practices (bribing companies to use their processors instead of AMD's) in the past. I don't want this to deteriorate into a flame war so I'll stop here.

Regardless of what they've done there's no arguing with Intel's ability to engineer great CPUs and chipsets. I'm not surprised that they've posted high profits this quarter.

Chazz said:

Microsoft also made a buttload of money. Its crazy how everyone has been screaming that the sky is falling in these companies, but it seems like every year they break their own records.

captainawesome captainawesome said:

I think the fact that Mac sales are increasing means good news for Intel. Scratch that, I KNOW... I wonder how much Intel bribed them though...?

captainawesome captainawesome said:

But there is no doubt, *this* is the key to their success:

"...and $4.4 billion allocated to research and development..."

Guest said:

"But there is no doubt, *this* is the key to their success:

"...and $4.4 billion allocated to research and development..." "

yep! if amd would have done the same at it's high point, they would still be relevant today.

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