Intel confirms Ivy Bridge delay, cites issues with 22nm process

By on February 27, 2012, 9:22 AM

More information on Intel's Ivy Bridge planned launch has come to light over the weekend. Although a recent rumor downplayed a possible delay, saying that quad-core notebook CPUs and all desktop parts remain on track for April, the company's executive vice-president Sean Maloney has now confirmed to The Financial Times that there is in fact a delay and that he "thinks" the 22nm chips will only go on sale in June.

That's still within the second quarter schedule that Intel had envisioned but the launch was set back roughly 8-10 weeks from the original April target. Maloney denied reports that the upcoming Ivy Bridge processors had been pushed back because PC vendors still had a huge inventory of Sandy Bridge notebooks. Instead, he cited the new 22nm manufacturing process as the main reason behind the delay.

It's unclear if the delay affects both desktop and mobile parts or just the latter. Although it would seem all Ivy Bridge products have been pushed back, VR-Zone believes desktop parts are still scheduled for April, or at least partners will have early access to them to show off their new motherboards at CeBIT next month.

The delay underlines the problems chip makers will face with increasingly smaller and more complex process nodes. Luckily for Intel, weak competition from AMD means they can afford to take their time and get it right.




User Comments: 13

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Raswan Raswan said:

"Luckily for Intel, weak competition from AMD means they can afford to take their time and get it right."

Ouch. Hurts even more because it's true.

MrTomTom said:

Raswan said:

"Luckily for Intel, weak competition from AMD means they can afford to take their time and get it right."

Ouch. Hurts even more because it's true.

Thing is AMD isn't trying hard anymore. They're more focused on the notebook CPU market since they've pushed those new fusion cpu/igp chips.

Scshadow said:

The only thing they are having trouble manufacturing is the will to act competitive.

Lionvibez said:

AMD trying hard = Phenom,Phenom II, Bulldozer.

Which wasn't enough to begin with.

So now they are left with the scraps of the other markets, you made it sound like they had a choice.

slh28 slh28, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Raswan said:

"Luckily for Intel, weak competition from AMD means they can afford to take their time and get it right."

Ouch. Hurts even more because it's true.

Conspiracy theorists would say the delay is deliberate because of weak competition...

Lionvibez said:

slh28 said:

Raswan said:

"Luckily for Intel, weak competition from AMD means they can afford to take their time and get it right."

Ouch. Hurts even more because it's true.

Conspiracy theorists would say the delay is deliberate because of weak competition...

We don't know if that is the main reason but I guarantee it is one of them.

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

Just to get back on track...

Sweclockers are reporting that Z77, Z75, H77 and B75 will start hitting retail on 8th April -any buyer would need to use a Sandy Bridge CPU at this time.

NDA lifts ( tech review sites are allowed to publish) for Ivy Bridge CPU's on 29th April

MilwaukeeMike said:

lionvibez said:

slh28 said:

Conspiracy theorists would say the delay is deliberate because of weak competition...

We don't know if that is the main reason but I guarantee it is one of them.

are you sure you don't think this because you know nothing about manufacturing a chip at 22nm, but can easily understand the concepts of weak competition?

Until someone explains to me that making a 22nm chip is really easy step to make I'll take Intel at their word.

Anyway... If Intel wanted to either a) wait until Sandy Bridge stuff was sold or b) wait until AMD had a competing chip, then why would they give us a release date?

Darth Shiv Darth Shiv said:

Yes going to 22nm would have hurdles. Most die have had yield issues but they used to just plough on ahead cause of competition.

Darth Shiv Darth Shiv said:

Should be "most die shrinks"

soldier1969 soldier1969 said:

Meh I can wait, its only going to be a 10-20% at best boost over my current 2600k @ 4.5. I will combine it with 2 GTX 680s in SLI when it does come for a current system this Summer as I do every Summer.

computergeek said:

soldier1969 said:

Meh I can wait, its only going to be a 10-20% at best boost over my current 2600k @ 4.5. I will combine it with 2 GTX 680s in SLI when it does come for a current system this Summer as I do every Summer.

ya but your 2 gtx 680 wont be able to utilize pci 3.0 cause your 2600k doesn't support pci 3.0 and ivy does

Guest said:

"ya but your 2 gtx 680 wont be able to utilize pci 3.0 cause your 2600k doesn't support pci 3.0 and ivy does"

That's not true. Even HD7970 doesn't benefit from PCIE 3.0 in games.

All you need is PCIe 2.0 x16 at this point to feed a single-GPU videocard.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5458/the-radeon-hd-7970-repris
-pcie-bandwidth-overclocking-and-msaa

Even PCIe 2.0 x8 has a small performance penalty.

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