Intel's Ivy Bridge mobile processor benchmarked

By on April 9, 2012, 1:00 PM

A reference notebook powered by Intel’s upcoming Ivy Bridge processor has been benchmarked by a Bulgarian website by the name of Laptop.bg and the findings look promising for mobile users. The system in question is reportedly running a quad-core i7-3610QM processor clocked at 2.3GHz and turned in results that were eight to 22 percent better than a comparable Sandy Bridge i7-2670QM at 2.2GHz.

The die-shrunk processor performed exceedingly well in Cinebench 10 and 11, thoroughly trouncing current Sandy Bridge chips in both single and multi-CPU tests. Another test called Fritz Chess Benchmark allegedly turned in a score of 11,555 kilo nodes per second, toppling the previous high of 10,267 from the Sandy Bridge 2670QM.

In a real-world test using Adobe Photoshop CS5, Ivy Bridge was once again the fastest chip tested but the margin of victory was much smaller – only two seconds faster than its counterpart. 3DMark 2005 numbers using the integrated Intel HD Graphics 4000 were promising but 3DMark 2011 performance was lacking. Testing in Resident Evil 5 at modest graphics settings resulted in an average frame rate of 22.9 which isn’t quite enough to be deemed ‘playable’.

Intel is expected to launch Ivy Bridge on April 29 which will include several Core i5 and i7 chips for desktops and three i7 processors for notebooks. Furthermore, dual-core mobile CPUs are expected in the first week of June in addition to several more quad-core desktop parts. Early reports show a lack of low-voltage parts which suggests we might not see Ivy Bridge Ultrabooks until later this spring.




User Comments: 6

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Guest said:

Do you guys think intel will catch up with amd in the graphic department?

Guest said:

naw dude, thats a long shot, by the time they do , "If they do", you wont even like games anymore, you are gonna be into " whats the fastest wheel chair in the market" by then.

Lionvibez said:

Guest said:

naw dude, thats a long shot, by the time they do , "If they do", you wont even like games anymore, you are gonna be into " whats the fastest wheel chair in the market" by then.

lmao

They certainly have the money for it but lack the experience Ati had.

I think you will see their cpu's maybe getting closer to equal before we see the graphics being equal if ever.

amstech amstech, TechSpot Enthusiast, said:

@ Lionvibez: Your comment about ATi makes no sense.

@ Guest: AMD is trying to catch/keep up with Nvidia, the circle goes round and round . Nvidia's drivers/features/software is far superior and the best money can buy.

As far as the article, I can't wait to see how much of a difference the 3D transistors can make when utilized properly. Sandy Bridge had respectable performance though, not surprised to see my little 2430M hang in there.

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

They certainly have the money for it but lack the experience Ati had

The only things lacking are the will, and drivers. Intel now seemingly has the desire to move into iGPU, and drivers?...well, how long does it take to get some of AMD's fired staff to sign an employee contract ?

I think you will see their cpu's maybe getting closer to equal before we see the graphics being equal if ever.

I presume you mean AMD getting closer to Intel's CPU, and not vice versa...and I think you're wrong in the overall supposition in any case.

1. How much graphics horsepower does a mobile CPU/APU actually need, bearing in mind screen resolution and the general state of gaming ?

2. At the speed of Intel's innovation, AMD could well be staring at a major deficit in performance/watt (a major consideration in the mobile space) and performance/mm^2 (foundry process), and a much closer comparison in on-die graphics once Intel integrate on-package DRAM into their CPU's.

You seem to be suffering from the same myopia that has plagued AMD for some years- namely a blind faith that AMD will offer a better product based on past events. You would have thought that Conroe, Nehalem, Sandy Bridge and Fermi/Kepler might have cured the belief that AMD were the only company capable of innovation.

Zeromus said:

dividebyzero said:

They certainly have the money for it but lack the experience Ati had

The only things lacking are the will, and drivers. Intel now seemingly has the desire to move into iGPU, and drivers?...well, how long does it take to get some of AMD's fired staff to sign an employee contract ?

I think you will see their cpu's maybe getting closer to equal before we see the graphics being equal if ever.

I presume you mean AMD getting closer to Intel's CPU, and not vice versa...and I think you're wrong in the overall supposition in any case.

1. How much graphics horsepower does a mobile CPU/APU actually need, bearing in mind screen resolution and the general state of gaming ?

2. At the speed of Intel's innovation, AMD could well be staring at a major deficit in performance/watt (a major consideration in the mobile space) and performance/mm^2 (foundry process), and a much closer comparison in on-die graphics once Intel integrate on-package DRAM into their CPU's.

You seem to be suffering from the same myopia that has plagued AMD for some years- namely a blind faith that AMD will offer a better product based on past events. You would have thought that Conroe, Nehalem, Sandy Bridge and Fermi/Kepler might have cured the belief that AMD were the only company capable of innovation.

About the intel's idea of iGPUs, they're more lenient on the idea that their streaming implementations are bottlenecked by main memory bandwidth. I think it's more correct to say their GPUs are fine and that all that was missing was faster memory.

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