Amped Wireless launches R20000G dual-band router with 10,000ft coverage

By Lee Kaelin on May 15, 2012, 10:30 AM

U.S. manufacturer of long-range wireless communications products for the home and office Amped Wireless yesterday announced the release of their new flagship router, the R20000G, a high-performance Wireless-N dual-band router. The device features a 620MHz internal processor, four gigabit Ethernet ports, one gigabit modem Ethernet port, dual 2.4GHz and dual 5.0GHz 600mW amplifiers combined with 5dB antennas for providing up to 10,000ft² of simultaneous 2.4GHz and 5.0GHz Wireless-N coverage at up to 600Mbps.

"Amped Wireless has continued to make strides in the industry with our innovative power amplifying technology and design," said Jason Owen, president and CEO at Amped Wireless. "The R20000G is the ideal product for any consumer that wants to outfit their entire office or home and backyard, with a high performance router with the most Wi-Fi coverage on the market today."

Part of the reason the new router achieves such high levels of coverage is due to the powerful WiFi amplifiers. Amped Wireless says more traditional Wireless-N routers use 50mW amplifiers, in comparison the R20000G uses 600mW amplifiers which gives substantially more powerful WiFi coverage.  The same is true of the antennas, which are over five times more powerful than more traditional wireless antennas.

Support is provided for the latest wireless security protocols as well as a USB port for storage devices which can be shared locally across networked devices or accessed remotely via FTP. The wireless signal strength is also adjustable from 15% to 100% and the router can provide up to four separate wireless guest networks with restricted access to the internet.

The router also includes support for setting up parental controls as well as scheduling for wireless access and user access control via IP or Mac address and a smart firewall. It can be wall mounted, laid flat on a desk or other similar surface as well as stood vertically using the supplied stand. 

It's available for purchase from the company's website at a cost of $179.99, with free ground shipping, a 30-day return period and includes a one year manufacturers warranty. Stock will be arriving with selected retailers shortly.




User Comments: 11

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MilwaukeeMike said:

I'm confused.... this is a router that has great range. But to use the internet you need to upload and download, even if you're just sending a request to view a webpage. So won't my PC or tablet or whatever also need to capable of this long range?

I know it's possible (my phone broadcasts to a cell tower after all), but if our battery powered devices already have this range, why do current routers that are plugged into the wall have such a small range? I assumed it was signal quality and restrictions of the 2.4 Ghz band etc. All they needed to do was turn up the power on the signal?! Why aren't all routers long range?

thewind said:

ok so 100 feet times 100 feet is 10,000 square feet right? so the radius of this is only 50 feet? how is this long range? I already get more than 50 feet with my belkin roughter.

Guest said:

since we're dealing with a radius, then the area is pi times radius squared, not the square root of the area cut in half. so technically the redius is 56.4 feet. just a technicality, haha. the extra 6 feet doesn't do a whole lot in terms of making it any longer range, and the 10,000 sqft figure is clearly presented that way to provide some shock-value

Guest said:

Shock value it is, or marketing bling for the uninformed. My bet is that this is no better than any wireless router, and may be even worse than some.

Doctor John Doctor John said:

I totally agree, I wonder what's long-range about a fairly average footprint?

Staff
Rick Rick, TechSpot Staff, said:

I'm confused.... this is a router that has great range. But to use the internet you need to upload and download, even if you're just sending a request to view a webpage.

Right. Every packet sent or received must be acknowledged by the other device -- this is a fundamental design property of Wi-Fi and the reason high-power transmitters are useless on their own.

There are only two things that make high-powered transmitters worthwhile: 1.) A more sensitive receiver or 2.) a high-powered client adapter

Perhaps the R20000G has a more sensitive receiver. 5dB antennas are a start, but will make little difference. Unfortunately, higher gain antennas run the risk of making things worse unless they are directional and that would pose a problem for most consumers.

I don't doubt the R20000G is a step up from a $30 Linksys router, but the claim it will make a huge difference in range is really is just snake oil.

Wireless power line network adapters are where its at for most people, I believe.

Guest said:

ha ha. Is ampeg for real? 50 ft radius for 180$. ha ha. Deceptive advertising at its worst.

Staff
Rick Rick, TechSpot Staff, said:

ha ha. Is ampeg for real? 50 ft radius for 180$. ha ha. Deceptive advertising at its worst.

In all fairness, the average American home is about 2500 square feet. The median is even less.

Also, radius is also not as important as diameter -- we aren't talking about a directional antenna. Many people will be able to put this in a central area and get more than just a 50ft pie wedge of coverage.

Guest said:

I disagree with you for this operates on the same concept as the internet. You need to download more then you upload so a high power router makes sense. Uploading can be degraded and slow as long as the download is at full power.

Staff
Rick Rick, TechSpot Staff, said:

I disagree with you for this operates on the same concept as the internet. You need to download more then you upload so a high power router makes sense. Uploading can be degraded and slow as long as the download is at full power.

It doesn't work that way. We aren't talking about reduced bandwidth; moreover, we're talking about no transmission connectivity at all (or at best, intermittent)

Even "downloaded" (received) data need to be acknowledged via "uploaded" (transmitted) packets. If you can't transmit to the Wi-Fi router, then receiving data from it is worthless.

Guest said:

Guest said: '

I disagree with you for this operates on the same concept as the internet. You need to download more then you upload so a high power router makes sense. Uploading can be degraded and slow as long as the download is at full power.

Rick said: '

It doesn't work that way. We aren't talking about reduced bandwidth; moreover, we're talking about no transmission connectivity at all (or at best, intermittent)

Even "downloaded" (received) data need to be acknowledged via "uploaded" (transmitted) packets. If you can't transmit to the Wi-Fi router, then receiving data from it is worthless.

Except for two circumstances.

1. You can set your SSID to whatever you want (and broadcast the name of your Business or 'something else') and you can update the SSID minute-by-minute to SPAM Ads.

2. [link]

Both of those are one-way communication via WiFi (and fairly useful).

Other than those situations you would need an equally powerful Transmitter (and quality Receiver) on the other end to enable two way transmission; unless all the Satellites had directional Antennas (as in an Office or a (very) small village (third world Internet)).

The one who owns the Router pays for the Internet connection and everyone else gets a free ride if the Router is open or the password is known (pass=SSID name). This works in my large City and I can use my WiFi Phone half a Block from my House (but it is slow). That saves huge on my Cell Phone Bill

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