Google report shows increase in censorship, anti-piracy requests

By on November 14, 2012, 5:30 PM

This summer, Google's Transparency Report indicated an increase in global government censorship. Google's latest bi-annual look though illustrates not only a continued increase, but a substantial uptick of government-issued requests in just past six months. In fact, requests to take down websites have increased by more than two-thirds since the last report six months ago.

The Google Transparency Report publicly disseminates website take-down requests, user data requests, traffic patterns and copyright notices received by Google from various government agencies, businesses and organizations. Such requests range anywhere from piracy to just plain old-fashioned censorship.

Even more so than government-issued take-downs though, copyright removals have skyrocketed since the last report. Google is now asked to remove nearly 2 million URLs per week from its search listings. That figure is a gain of nearly 400 percent when compared to numbers from six months ago. By a wide margin, filestube.com was the top source of copyright complaints. Unsurprisingly, various BitTorrent sites also pepper the list.

One huge reason for the rise in government requests was Turkey. This country has been busy, making more than 10 times the number of requests than it did during the first half of 2012. The majority of the requests made asked Google to remove controversial YouTube videos featuring pivotal former Turkish leader Atatürk. Google complied with about two-thirds of those requests, blocking Turkish users from viewing the videos. However, none of the videos were actually removed from YouTube itself -- they remained accessible outside of Turkey.

Overall, the percentage of requests Google actually complies with has dropped substantially from 76 percent to about 52 percent. Google frequently denies requests for take-downs and user information for various reasons, but notes some governments have actually falsified court orders in order to trick the company into compliance.




User Comments: 12

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1 person liked this | avoidz avoidz said:

Governments using illegal methods to stop illegal activity? You don't say.

amstech amstech, TechSpot Enthusiast, said:

I am under the belief that Uncle Sam monitors, tracks and records whatever he wants, whenever he wants, however he wants. Nothing you can put on your devices (laptop/phone/servers etc) is going to change that, not advanced packet tracers, port scanners, keyloggers, IP/Mac maskers, the most sophisticated firewall or anti-virus, encryption, etc etc. If its online, its accessible.

Maybe I am wrong.

ikesmasher said:

I am under the belief that Uncle Sam monitors, tracks and records whatever he wants, whenever he wants, however he wants. Nothing you can put on your devices (laptop/phone/servers etc) is going to change that, not advanced packet tracers, port scanners, keyloggers, IP/Mac maskers, the most sophisticated firewall or anti-virus, encryption, etc etc. If its online, its accessible.

Maybe I am wrong.

you arent wrong, but that doesnt mean what they are doing is right morally or legally.

avoidz avoidz said:

you arent wrong, but that doesnt mean what they are doing is right morally or legally.

But when they control what is moral and legal, what can be done?

"It is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it..."

PinothyJ said:

I am under the belief that Uncle Sam monitors, tracks and records whatever he wants, whenever he wants, however he wants. Nothing you can put on your devices (laptop/phone/servers etc) is going to change that, not advanced packet tracers, port scanners, keyloggers, IP/Mac maskers, the most sophisticated firewall or anti-virus, encryption, etc etc. If its online, its accessible.

Maybe I am wrong.

You do know 'Uncle Sam' was a meat monitor, don't you...

ikesmasher said:

But when they control what is moral and legal, what can be done?

"It is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it..."

ima see how this thing with texas goes when they get denied their succession petition.

Guest said:

Governments don't control what is right or wrong (what is genuinely ethical in the classical sense). They only control what is legal. It is tragic when it is the case that what is legal may actually be wrong and unjust. If it were the case that they controlled what is ethical or unethical, then the concept of ethics becomes arbitrary and looses the relevance the notion seeks. Since corruption seeks power, what is right and just frequently teeters on a knife's edge. "The more corrupt the state the more it legislates"-Tacitus.

Guest said:

Google can really do its part to clean up the filth on Youtube.

Guest said:

"I am under the belief that Uncle Sam monitors, tracks and records whatever he wants, whenever he wants, however he wants. Nothing you can put on your devices (laptop/phone/servers etc) is going to change that, not advanced packet tracers, port scanners, keyloggers, IP/Mac maskers, the most sophisticated firewall or anti-virus, encryption, etc etc. If its online, its accessible. Maybe I am wrong."

That's why NSA exist..

Tygerstrike said:

Guys im not one to talk smack, even about ppl who wear their tin foil hats. Yes the govt. has the ability to track/eavesdrop/snoop, but you have to have either done something to get their attention, or commited a serious crime. Otherwise, the govt. dont care to snoop. I mean you make it sound like the big bad govt. is always watching you. Heres some news for you, youre just not worth their time. Unless you have met the previous criteria, they are more then content to let you live your life.

Guest said:

The more the global community integrates the separation of people by border and government continues to strink. this of but one of the many effects resulting from that process.

another way to look at it is, the domain of government control of your everyday life is shrinking and this is a sort of response made to try and restablish or dampen that rate of shrinking control!

Guest said:

Not all the activity the governments are stopping are illegal.

Just think what kind of governments want to get user information by illegal means.

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